Printer Friendly

They're easy, and they bloom indoors ... the "spaths."

They're easy, and they bloom indoors . . . the "spaths'

You probably think of spathiphyllum as a medium-size house plant with glossy green leaves and anthurium-like white flowers. You aren't wrong. But you're only partly right.

If you haven't shopped for spathiphyllums (spa-thi-fie-lums) lately, you'll be surprised at the variety of kinds available. Now, "spaths' come in sizes from foot-tall dwarf varieties (just right for a desk-top), to lush 6-foot giants.

Flowers vary, too, as do leaves (see photographs). For example, the shiny leaf of "St. Mary' measures 10 by 17 inches-- more than three times longer and six times wider than the 1 1/2- by 5-inch leaf of "Wallisii'.

One new variety, "Silver Streak' (also called "Mini' or "Variegated Mini'), has a greenish white stripe down the center of its 6-inch-long leaf. And, unlike most spathiphyllums, its leaves aren't glossy.

Spathiphyllums remain one of the few house plants that bloom dependably. Some commercial growers say that "Tasson' blooms more readily.

Given the right conditions, spaths should flower from winter to late spring. Grow them in bright, indirect light or they'll get leggy and won't bloom. Or, if they do bloom, the flowers may be greenish instead of white.

Spathiphyllums wilt dramatically if not watered enough; repeated wilting can turn leaf edges brown. To eliminate wide fluctuations in soild moisture, add soil polymers to the potting mix. (For more on polymers, see the April 1987 Sunset, except in our Northwest edition, where it appeared in June.) Keep the soil moist, not wet. Also, situate plants away from heat vents and air conditioners.

Photo: Towering over the rest at 3 1/2 feet tall, "Mauna Loa' gets a drink. Surrounding it are, from far left, "Supreme' (30 inches), "Wallisii' (20 inches). "Silver Streak' (18 inches), and "Tasson' (24 inches). Tallest variety, 6-foot "St. Mary', is not shown

Photo: Leaves and flowers range from small to giant. Below, from left, she holds flower bracts of "Tasson', "Wallisii', "Silver Streak', and "St. Mary' (their column-like blooms rise in center)
COPYRIGHT 1988 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1988 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Sunset
Date:Jan 1, 1988
Words:335
Previous Article:The half-pint gladiolus ... now's time to plant.
Next Article:April strawberries to October apples, a garden planned for good tastes and good looks.
Topics:


Related Articles
Did you get an amaryllis for Christmas?
Downsizing.
Thinking small ... the little daffodils.
Winter orchids.
The gentle art of forcing bulbs.
Quick guide to gift plants.
The dramatic bromeliads.
IT'S OK TO FORCE THINGS IN QUEST FOR BLOOMS.
SPRING IN BLOOM BULBS BRING FRESH COLOR, FRAGRANCE INDOORS WHILE IT'S STILL CHILLY OUTDOORS.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters