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The Joy of Chemistry: the Amazing Science of Familiar Things.

THE JOY OF CHEMISTRY: The Amazing a·maze  
v. a·mazed, a·maz·ing, a·maz·es

v.tr.
1. To affect with great wonder; astonish. See Synonyms at surprise.

2. Obsolete To bewilder; perplex.

v.intr.
 Science of Familiar Things CATHY COBB Cobb   , Tyrus Raymond Known as "Ty." 1886-1961.

American baseball player and manager who was the first player elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame (1936).
 AND MONTY L. FETTEROLF

Like cooking and sex, chemistry has inspired enough joy to fill a book. The Joy of Chemistry outlines the many ways in which this subject, usually confined to textbooks and science fairs, applies to everyday life. From the functioning of computers and smoke detectors smoke detector
n.
An alarm device that automatically detects the presence of smoke. Also called smoke alarm.
 to how fall foliage changes color, chemistry is at work everywhere. This book introduces readers to the world of chemistry through accessible prose and engaging experiments. After a brief introduction on safety and a useful shopping list, the book jumps into the first of more than 20 at-home projects: making a bottle-rocket out of common household materials. These aren't how-to science projects for kids, but rather "demonstrations" for a wide range of readers. Each demonstration is followed by a chapter containing a simple explanation of such chemical principles as intermolecular Adj. 1. intermolecular - existing or acting between molecules; "intermolecular forces"; "intermolecular condensation"  attractions and bonds, the behavior of gases, and the differences between acids and bases. The chapters also look into the history of the principles underlying the demonstration and offer examples of chemistry from everyday life. For example, one passage explains why fresh pizza goes bad, and another tells readers how their kidneys are similar to celery celery, biennial plant (Apium graveolens) of the family Umbelliferae (parsley family), of wide distribution in the wild state throughout the north temperate Old World and much cultivated also in America. . This informative book can provide not only deeper understanding of the way things work but also enjoyment. Prometheus, 2005, 393 p., b&w illus., hardcover, $26.00.
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Copyright 2005, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Title Annotation:Books: a selection of new and notable books of scientific interest
Publication:Science News
Article Type:Brief Article
Date:Mar 26, 2005
Words:233
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