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The 2008-18 job outlook in brief.

Some occupations will fare better than others over the 2008-18 decade. Although it's impossible to predict the future, we can gain insight into job outlook by analyzing trends in population growth, technological advances, and business practices. This insight is helpful in planning a career.

The Occupational Outlook Handbook--published every 2 years by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)--features projections of long-term job growth and employment prospects for nearly 300 occupations. This special issue of the Occupational Outlook Quarterly (OOQ) includes a table summarizing that information so readers can compare occupations at a glance.

The next few pages help you get the most out of that table. Read on to learn what BLS projections mean, why employment is changing, and how BLS makes its projections.

Understanding employment projections

BLS projections give a broad overview of future employment conditions. They show expected changes in employment over the entire 2008-18 decade, but they do not depict variation from one year to another. Also, BLS projections are national in scope. Because conditions vary significantly by location, jobseekers should supplement this general analysis with more specific information from State workforce agencies and career counselors. (See, for example, www.careeronestop.org.)

BLS projections show expected job growth or decline in various occupations. Usually, occupations that are gaining jobs offer more opportunities for workers than other occupations do. Each job that is added to a growing occupation equals an opening for a worker trying to enter that occupation.

But job growth tells only part of the story. Opportunities in any occupation are also shaped by how many of today's workers will need to be replaced when they retire or leave their occupations for other reasons. Job prospects also depend on how much competition there is for jobs. An occupation is more difficult to enter if many people want to work in it or if many people qualify for it.

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Understanding job growth

In the table, projected employment change over the 2008-18 decade is shown in two ways: as a number and as a percent. The number shows the actual number of jobs projected to be added or lost in an occupation. Percent change shows the rate of expected job growth or decline.

Sometimes, occupations with large projected changes in employment are also growing or declining at a fast rate. For example, between 2008 and 2018, employment of registered nurses is expected to grow by almost 582,000 jobs--the largest projected gain of any occupation. And the occupation's projected growth rate of 22 percent is well above the 10-percent average for all occupations.

Other times, there is no correlation between projected numeric changes in employment and rapid growth or decline. Financial examiners, for example, are projected to add 11,000 jobs over the decade--a relatively small gain. But that increase represents growth of 41 percent--a rate that's four times faster than the projected average growth rate for all occupations. And office clerks are projected to gain 375,000 jobs--a considerable increase that represents a 12-percent growth rate, which is about average. In general, occupations with the greatest numeric changes are those that already have large numbers of workers. The fastest rates of change are usually in occupations that have fewer workers.

Job prospects

Increases and decreases in the number of jobs affect how easy it is to enter an occupation, but the total number of jobs is not the only factor. Employment prospects are also affected by how many workers leave and need to be replaced and by how many people want and qualify for jobs.

Replacement needs. Most of the job openings for people entering an occupation for the first time come not from job growth but from replacement needs, which are the needs to replace workers who retire or permanently leave the occupation for other reasons.

Replacement needs sometimes provide numerous job openings even in an occupation that is projected to decline. The total number of machinists, for example, is expected to fall in the coming decade. But the occupation still offers good job prospects because many of today's machinists are expected to retire soon, and some of them will need to be replaced. And occupations that have many jobs, high worker turnover, or many workers of retirement age offer numerous opportunities, no matter what their level of growth.

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Competition. If many qualified people are vying for jobs in an occupation, that occupation might be harder to enter. Occupations that are considered glamorous or prestigious, such as fashion designers and financial analysts, are often the most difficult to enter.

If an occupation has specific entry requirements, BLS economists can sometimes estimate how many people will qualify for future jobs and can compare that number with the number of projected job openings. This estimate of the expected supply of workers is based on historical data about the number of college degrees or technical certifications granted in subjects related to the occupation, information from technical journals and other relevant literature, interviews with occupational experts, and the judgment of the BLS economists who study the occupation.

Why employment is changing

Occupations gain or lose jobs because of different, often conflicting, forces. Demand for what an occupation's workers produce drives up the number of jobs in an occupation. At the same time, some innovation might make each worker more productive and, thus, reduce the number needed to create goods or provide services. Demand and innovation combine to change employment and affect job prospects.

Similarly, a change in technology, business practices, population, or some other element can drive growth in some occupations while slowing it in others. Automation, for example, may slow growth in some production occupations, but it may speed growth in occupations in which workers install or repair automation equipment.

This section highlights three of the most prevalent influences on employment gains or losses: changes in the demand for goods and services, increased worker productivity, and new business practices. Each is discussed frequently in the outlook table.

Demand for goods and services. As the population grows, so too does demand for many goods and services. This increased demand often results in a greater need for workers who produce those goods and provide those services, which, in turn, generates employment growth in many occupations. For example, a growing population's demand for more roads increases the need for construction workers, surveyors, and landscape architects.

Beyond population growth, demographic changes in the population affect demand for goods and services and, by extension, employment. For instance, as baby boomers age, demand for services related to healthcare--and for workers in occupations providing these services--is expected to increase.

At the same time, the number of children will increase, and those children will need education and supervision, creating many new jobs for teachers and child care workers.

Another factor affecting the demand for goods and services is economic growth. An increase in business activity leads to growth in many occupations, from secretaries to securities analysts. And rising incomes and greater affluence spur employment growth in occupations related to luxury goods and financial planning.

Technological change can also affect employment in many occupations. Advances in information technology, for example, are expected to increase demand for workers who write software, design and maintain computer networks, or otherwise help businesses take advantage of those advances. And continuing development in telecommunications technology and the Internet is spurring demand for writers, artists, and graphic designers who create content for Web sites and other media.

Changes in the law also affect the goods and services demanded and the jobs created. Stricter financial regulations, for example, heighten demand for accountants and auditors.

In the same way, shifting tastes change the goods and services demanded by consumers. These changes lead, in turn, to changes in employment. Continued demand for motorcycles, for example, is expected to create new jobs for small engine mechanics to repair these vehicles. And concern about personal appearance will strengthen demand for skin care specialists.

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Increased worker productivity. Computers, automated machinery, and other laborsaving technology reduce the number of workers needed to produce goods and provide services, thus lowering employment. This is why jobs for farmers are projected to decline even as the production of food increases.

Rising worker productivity slows job growth in many occupations. For example, the expected lack of job gains among assemblers--who generally work in factories making manufactured goods--is due, in part, to increased automation, improved manufacturing processes, and other productivity-boosting developments.

New business practices. Sometimes, organizations change the way in which they produce goods or provide services, and establishments might begin to hire more workers in one occupation to remain competitive. For example, rapid employment growth for management analysts is projected as organizations conduct more public opinion research and increase their marketing efforts to stay competitive.

How BLS develops projections

BLS economists analyze changing conditions, including the ones described above, to create specific estimates of job growth and decline. How do they do it? The process involves several steps.

Economists begin by estimating the total number of available workers based on population growth and labor force participation rates. Based on trends, they project demand for goods and services. The economists next project how employment will grow in the industries that provide those goods and services.

Finally, BLS economists analyze what types of work employers in those industries need. They estimate how many of an industry's jobs will be in a given occupation by researching production methods, business practices, and other factors--and analyzing how these elements are changing.

When making projections, economists rely on ongoing trends. But trends can change unexpectedly because of shifts in technology, consumer preferences, or trade patterns and because of natural disasters, wars, and other unpredictable events.

For more information about the employment projections program, visit online at www.bls.gov/emp or call (202) 691-5700.

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A note about the economy in 2008

The usual practice for BLS is to prepare new projections every other year, with the base year of the projections decade being an even-numbered year. For this set of projections, the base year, 2008, happens to be during a significant downturn in the U.S. economy. Total employment of wage and salary workers fell by 532,000 between 2007 and 2008, and it continued to fall in 2009. The construction, manufacturing, and financial activities industry sectors, along with occupations that are concentrated in these industries, were hit particularly hard.

When developing long-term projections, however, the focus is on long-term trends in population, labor force, productivity, and output growth. The population and the labor force have been aging, and their growth rates are slowing. These long-term trends are expected to continue, regardless of the fluctuations in the economy. Readers should keep in mind, however, that the projected changes in employment between 2008 and 2018 usually include regaining part or all of the jobs that have been lost during the downturn.

Guide to the table

The table that follows is divided into sections that correspond with the 10 groups in the Standard Occupational Classification System. Use the index beginning on page 50 to find a specific occupation.

Employment data

The table provides a snapshot of how employment is expected to change in 289 occupations. For each occupation, it shows estimated employment in 2008, the projected numeric change in employment (that is, how many jobs are expected to be gained or lost) over the 2008-18 decade, and the projected percent change in employment (that is, the rate of job growth or loss). Then, a key phrase describes the rate of job growth as compared with other occupations (see box) and is followed by a summary of job prospects and factors affecting employment.

The employment data in the table come from the BLS National Employment Matrix, except where noted. The symbol (*) marks the occupations that are projected to grow much faster than average or to gain at least 200,000 new jobs.

Occupational groups

Occupations that have similar job duties are grouped according to the tasks that the workers in them perform. The table lists employment and outlook summaries for occupations in the following 10 groups:

Management, business, and financial. Workers in these occupations establish plans and policies, manage money, and direct business activities.

Professional and related. Workers in this group perform a variety of skilled functions, such as diagnosing and treating illness, teaching, or designing.

Service. This group includes workers who assist the public in a number of ways, from providing child care services to providing community safety.

Sales and related. Workers in this group sell goods and services.

Office and administrative support. In these occupations, workers prepare and organize documents, provide information to the public, gather and deliver goods, and operate office software and equipment.

Farming, fishing, and forestry. Workers in this group tend and harvest renewable resources and manage forests and public parks.

Construction trades and related. Workers in these occupations build and repair homes, roads, and office buildings and other structures.

Installation, maintenance, and repair. These workers install and repair all types of goods and equipment.

Production. By operating machines and other equipment, workers in this group assemble goods or distribute energy.

Transportation and material moving. Workers in these occupations move people and materials.

The table also includes a statement about opportunities in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Key phrases in the "Brief"

For descriptions about changing employment between 2008

and 2018:

If the description reads ...

Much faster than average growth

Faster than average growth

About average growth

Slower than average growth

Little or no change

Moderate decline

Rapid decline

Employment is projected to ...

Increase 20 percent or more

Increase 14 to 19 percent

Increase 7 to 13 percent

Increase 3 to 6 percent

Decrease 2 percent to increase 2 percent

Decrease 3 to 9 percent

Decrease 10 percent or more

For descriptions about opportunities or prospects:

If an occupation is projected to have "very good" or "excellent"

opportunities or prospects, then many openings are expected relative to

the number of jobseekers. The reference does not address the quality of

job openings or of the occupation's wages.
Management, business, and financial

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Management, business, and financial occupations

Management occupations

Administrative services 259,400 32,300 12
 managers

Advertising, marketing, 623,800 80,300 13
 promotions, public
 relations, and sales
 managers

Computer and information 293,000 49,500 17
 systems managers

Construction managers 551,000 94,800 17

Education administrators 445,400 37,000 8

Engineering and natural 228,700 18,200 8
 sciences managers

Farmers, ranchers, and 1,234,000 -64,600 -5
 agricultural managers

Financial managers 539,300 41,200 8

Food service managers 338,700 18,000 5

Funeral directors 30,000 3,600 12

Human resources, training, and 904,900 197,400 22
 labor relations managers (*)
 and specialists

Industrial production managers 156,100 -11,900 -8

Lodging managers 59,800 2,800 5

Medical and health services 283,500 45,400 16
 managers

Property, real estate, and 304,100 25,600 8
 community association
 managers

Purchasing managers, buyers, 527,400 38,500 7
 and purchasing agents

Top executives 2,133,500 -7,800 0

Business and financial operations occupations

Accountants and auditors 1,290,600 279,400 22
 (*) (*)

Appraisers and assessors of 92,400 4,200 5
 real estate

Budget analysts 67,200 10,100 15

Claims adjusters, appraisers, 306,300 20,900 7
 examiners, and investigators

Cost estimators 217,800 55,200 25
 (*)

Financial analysts 250,600 49,600 20
 (*)

Insurance underwriters 102,900 -4,300 -4

Loan officers 327,800 33,000 10

Management analysts 746,900 178,300 24
 (*)

Meeting and convention 56,600 8,800 16
 planners

Personal financial advisors 208,400 62,800 30
 (*)
Tax examiners, collectors, and 72,700 9,500 13
 revenue agents

Occupation Employment prospects

Management, business, and financial occupations

Management occupations

Administrative services About average growth. Employment
 managers of these workers is projected to
 increase as companies strive to
 maintain, secure, and efficiently
 operate their facilities. Competition
 should be keen for top managers;
 better opportunities are expected at
 the entry level.

Advertising, marketing, About average growth. Job growth is
 promotions, public expected to result from companies'
 relations, and sales need to distinguish their products
 managers and services in an increasingly
 competitive marketplace. Keen
 competition is expected.

Computer and information Faster than average growth. New
 systems managers applications of technology in the
 workplace should continue to drive
 demand for IT services, fueling
 employment growth of these managers.
 Job prospects are expected to be
 excellent.

Construction managers Faster than average growth. As
 population and the number of
 businesses grow, building activity is
 expected to increase, which in turn
 will boost employment of construction
 managers. Prospects should be
 best for jobseekers who have a
 bachelor's or higher degree in a
 construction-related discipline,
 plus construction experience.

Education administrators About average growth. Increasing
 student enrollments are expected to
 drive employment growth for these
 workers. Prospects are expected to be
 good.

Engineering and natural About average growth. Employment is
 sciences managers expected to grow along with that of
 the scientists and engineers these
 workers supervise. Prospects should
 be better in the rapidly growing
 areas of environmental and biomedical
 engineering and medical and
 environmental sciences.

Farmers, ranchers, and Moderate decline. As farm
 agricultural managers productivity increases and
 consolidation continues, a decline in
 the number of farmers and ranchers is
 expected. Agricultural managers at
 larger, well-financed operations
 should have better prospects. Small,
 local farming offers the best
 entry-level opportunities.

Financial managers About average growth. Business
 expansion and globalization will
 require financial expertise, which is
 expected to drive employment growth
 for these managers. Job growth,
 however, is expected to be tempered
 by mergers and downsizing. Keen
 competition is expected.

Food service managers Slower than average growth. Job
 losses resulting from a declining
 number of eating and drinking places
 will be partially offset by the
 creation of new jobs in grocery and
 convenience stores, healthcare and
 elder care facilities, and other
 establishments. Opportunities for new
 managers should be good because of
 the need to replace workers who leave
 the occupation.

Funeral directors About average growth. Projected
 employment growth reflects overall
 expansion of the death care services
 industry, due to the aging of the
 population. Job opportunities are
 expected to be good.

Human resources, training, and Much faster than average growth.
 labor relations managers Efforts to recruit and retain
 and specialists employees, the growing importance of
 employee training, and new legal
 standards are expected to increase
 employment of these workers. College
 graduates and those with
 certification should have the best
 opportunities.

Industrial production managers Moderate decline. Increased domestic
 labor productivity and rising imports
 are expected to reduce the need for
 these managers. Jobseekers who have
 experience in production
 occupations--along with a degree in
 industrial engineering, management,
 or business administration--should
 have the best job prospects.

Lodging managers Slower than average growth. Growth
 will be limited as the lodging
 industry streamlines operations and
 as new properties are smaller,
 limited-service hotels. But larger,
 full--service hotels--including
 resort and casino hotels--will
 continue to have openings.

Medical and health services Faster than average growth. The
 managers healthcare industry is expected to
 continue growing and diversifying,
 requiring managers increasingly to
 run business operations.
 Opportunities should be good,
 especially for jobseekers who have
 work experience in healthcare and
 strong business management skills.

Property, real estate, and About average growth. Job growth is
 community association expected to be driven, in part, by a
 managers growing population and increasing use
 of third-party management companies
 for residential property oversight.
 Opportunities should be best for
 jobseekers who have a college degree
 and earn professional designation.

Purchasing managers, buyers, About average growth. Almost all of
 and purchasing agents the growth is expected to be for
 purchasing agents, except wholesale,
 retail, and farm products, as more
 companies demand a greater number of
 goods and services.

Top executives Little or no change. The number of
 top executives is expected to remain
 steady, but employment may be
 adversely affected by consolidation
 and mergers. Keen competition is
 expected.

Business and financial operations occupations

Accountants and auditors Much faster than average growth. An
 increase in the number of businesses,
 a more stringent regulatory
 environment, and increased corporate
 accountability are expected to drive
 job growth for accountants and
 auditors. Opportunities should be
 favorable; jobseekers with
 professional certification,
 especially a CPA, should have the
 best prospects.

Appraisers and assessors of Slower than average growth. Projected
 real estate employment growth will be driven by
 economic expansion and population
 increases, both of which generate
 demand for real property. Job gains,
 however, will be limited somewhat by
 productivity increases related to
 increased use of computers and other
 technologies. Opportunities should be
 best in areas with active real estate
 markets.

Budget analysts Faster than average growth. Projected
 employment growth will be driven by
 the continued demand for financial
 analysis in both the public and the
 private sectors. Jobseekers with a
 master's degree should have the best
 prospects.

Claims adjusters, appraisers, About average growth. Job growth for
 examiners, and investigators adjusters and claims examiners should
 grow along with the growth of the
 healthcare industry. Employment
 growth for insurance investigators
 should be tempered by productivity
 increases associated with the
 Internet. Keen competition is
 expected for investigator jobs.

Cost estimators Much faster than average growth.
 Projected employment gains will be
 driven primarily by increased
 construction and repair activity,
 particularly that related to
 infrastructure. Jobseekers with a
 degree or extensive experience should
 have the best opportunities. In
 manufacturing, jobseekers who have a
 degree and are familiar with cost
 estimation software should have the
 best prospects.

Financial analysts Much faster than average growth. As
 investments become more numerous and
 complex, these workers will be needed
 for their expertise. Keen competition
 for openings is expected; jobseekers
 with a graduate degree and
 certification should have the best
 opportunities.

Insurance underwriters Moderate decline. Productivity
 increases, such as automatic
 underwriting, have limited employment
 of these workers. But this factor
 should be partially offset by an
 increased emphasis on underwriting to
 boost revenues and counteract
 decreasing returns on investments.
 Good job prospects are expected.

Loan officers About average growth. Overall
 economic expansion and population
 growth are expected to increase
 employment of these workers. However,
 increased automation through the use
 of the Internet loan application will
 temper employment growth. Good job
 opportunities are expected.

Management analysts Much faster than average growth.
 Organizations are expected to rely
 increasingly on outside expertise in
 an effort to maintain competitiveness
 and improve performance. Keen
 competition is expected.
 Opportunities are expected to be best
 for those who have a graduate degree,
 specialized expertise, and ability in
 salesmanship and public relations.

Meeting and convention Faster than average growth. Increased
 planners globalization is expected to heighten
 demand for face-to-face meetings,
 contributing to employment growth of
 the workers who plan such meetings.
 Opportunities should be best for
 jobseekers who have a bachelor's
 degree and some related experience.

Personal financial advisors Much faster than average growth.
 Employment growth for these workers
 is projected as large numbers of baby
 boomers retire and need advice on
 managing their retirement accounts.
 In addition, widespread transition
 from traditional pension plans to
 individually managed retirement
 savings programs should also create
 jobs. Keen competition is expected in
 this relatively high-paying
 occupation.

Tax examiners, collectors, and About average growth. Employment
 revenue agents growth of revenue agents and tax
 collectors should remain strong. The
 Federal Government is expected to
 increase its tax enforcement efforts,
 but demand for these workers'
 services is expected to be adversely
 affected by the automation of
 examiners' tasks and outsourcing of
 collection duties to private
 agencies.

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Professional and related occupations

Computer and mathematical occupations

Actuaries 19,700 4,200 21
 (*)

Computer network, systems, and 961,200 286,600 30
 database administrators (*) (*)

Computer scientists 28,900 7,000 24
 (*)

Computer software engineers 1,336,300 283,000 21
 and computer programmers (*) (*)

Computer support specialists 565,700 78,000 14

Computer systems analysts 532,200 108,100 20
 (*)

Mathematicians 2,900 700 22
 (*)

Operations research analysts 63,000 13,900 22
 (*)

Statisticians 22,600 2,900 13

Architects, surveyors and cartographers

Architects, except landscape 141,200 22,900 16
 and naval

Landscape architects 26,700 5,300 20
 (*)

Surveyors, cartographers, 147,000 27,600 19
 photogrammetrists, and
 surveying and mapping
 technicians

Engineers

 1,571,900 178,300 11

Drafters and engineering technicians

Drafters 251,900 10,700 4

Engineering technicians 497,300 25,800 5

Life scientists

Agricultural and food 31,000 4,800 16
 scientists

Biological scientists 91,300 19,200 21
 (*)
Conservation scientists and 29,800 3,600 12
 foresters

Medical scientists 109,400 44,200 40
 (*)

Physical scientists

Atmospheric scientists 9,400 1,400 15

Chemists and materials 94,100 3,300 3
 scientists

Environmental scientists and 85,900 23,900 28
 specialists (*)

Geoscientists and hydrologists 41,700 7,400 18

Physicists and astronomers 17,100 2,700 16

Social scientists and related occupations

Economists 14,600 900 6

Market and survey researchers 273,200 77,200 28
 (*)

Psychologists 170,200 19,700 12

Urban and regional planners 38,400 7,300 19

Sociologists and political 9,000 1,900 21
 scientists (*)

Social scientists, other 11,100 2,400 22
 (*)

Science technicians

 270,800 31,800 12

Community and social services occupations

Counselors 665,500 116,800 18

Health educators 66,200 12,000 18

Probation officers and 103,400 19,900 19
 correctional treatment
 specialists

Social and human service 352,000 79,400 23
 assistants (*)

Social workers 642,000 103,400 16

Leqal occupations

Court reporters 21,500 3,900 18

Judges, magistrates, and other 51,200 1,800 4
 judicial workers

Lawyers 759,200 98,500 13

Paralegals and legal 263,800 74,100 28
 assistants (*)

Education, training, library, and museum occupations

Archivists, curators, and 29,100 5,900 20
 museum technicians (*)

Instructional coordinators 133,900 31,100 23
 (*)

Librarians 159,900 12,500 8

Library technicians and 242,500 24,200 10
 library assistants

Teacher assistants 1,312,700 134,900 10

Teachers-adult literacy and 96,000 14,500 15
 remedial education

Teachers--postsecondary 1,699,200 256,900 15
 (*)

Teachers--preschool, except 457,200 86,700 19
 special education

Teachers--kindergarten, 3,476,200 468,600 13
 elementary, middle, and (*)
 secondary

Teachers--self-enrichment 253,600 81,300 32
 education (*)

Teachers--special education 473,000 81,900 17

Teachers--vocational 115,100 10,100 9

Art and design occupations

Artists and related workers 221,900 25,800 12

Commercial and industrial 44,300 4,000 9
 designers

Fashion designers 22,700 200 1

Floral designers 76,100 -1,900 -3

Graphic designers 286,100 36,900 13

Interior designers 71,700 13,900 19

Entertainers and performers, sports and, related occupations

Actors, producers, and 155,100 16,900 11
 directors

Athletes, coaches, umpires, 258,100 59,600 23
 and related workers (*)

Dancers and choreographers 29,200 1,700 6

Musicians, singers, and 240,000 19,600 8
 related workers

Media and communications-related occupations

Announcers 67,400 -2,400 -4

Authors, writers, and editors 281,300 22,100 8

Broadcast and sound 114,600 9,000 8
 engineering technicians and
 radio operators

Interpreters and translators 50,900 11,300 22
 (*)

News analysts, reporters, and 69,300 -4,400 -6
 correspondents

Photographers 152,000 17,500 12

Public relations specialists 275,200 66,200 24
 (*)

Technical writers 48,900 8,900 18

Television, video, and motion 51,900 5,400 11
 picture camera operators
 and editors

Health diagnosing and treating practitioners

Audiologists 12,800 3,200 25
 (*)

Chiropractors 49,100 9,600 20

Dentists 141,900 22,100 16

Dietitians and nutritionists 60,300 5,600 9

Occupational therapists 104,500 26,800 26
 (*)

Optometrists 34,800 8,500 24
 (*)

Pharmacists 269,900 45,900 17

Physical therapists 185,500 56,200 30
 (*)

Physician assistants 74,800 29,200 39
 (*)

Physicians and surgeons 661,400 144,100 22
 (*)

Podiatrists 12,200 1,100 9

Radiation therapists 15,200 4,100 27
 (*)

Recreational therapists 23,300 3,400 15

Registered nurses 2,618,700 581,500 22
 (*) (*)

Respiratory therapists 105,900 22,100 21
 (*)

Speech-language pathologists 119,300 22,100 19

Veterinarians 59,700 19,700 33
 (*)

Health technologists and technicians

Athletic trainers 16,300 6,000 37
 (*)

Cardiovascular technologists 49,500 11,900 24
 and technicians (*)

Clinical laboratory 328,100 45,600 14
 technologists and
 technicians

Dental hygienists 174,100 62,900 36
 (*)

Diagnostic medical 50,300 9,200 18
 sonographers

Emergency medical technicians 210,700 19,000 9
 and paramedics

Licensed practical and 753,600 155,600 21
 licensed vocational nurses (*)

Medical records and health 172,500 35,100 20
 information technicians (*)

Nuclear medicine technologists 21,800 3,600 16

Occupational health and 55,800 6,200 11
 safety specialists

Occupational health and 10,900 1,600 14
 safety technicians

Opticians, dispensing 59,800 8,000 13

Pharmacy technicians and aides 381,200 96,300 25
 (*)

Radiologic technologists and 214,700 37,000 17
 technicians

Surgical technologists 91,500 23,200 25
 (*)

Veterinary technologists and 79,600 28,500 36
 technicians (*)

Other professional and related occupations

Epidemiologists 4,800 700 15

Respiratory therapy 16,500 -200 -1
 technicians

Occupation Employment prospects

Professional and related occupations

Computer and mathematical occupations

Actuaries Much faster than average growth.
 Employment growth is projected as
 industries not traditionally
 associated with actuaries, such as
 financial services and consulting,
 employ these workers to assess risk.
 Keen competition is expected.

Computer network, systems, and Much faster than average growth.
 database administrators Employment of these workers should
 grow as organizations increasingly
 use network technologies and collect
 and organize data. Job prospects are
 expected to be excellent.

Computer scientists Much faster than average growth.
 Employment is expected to increase
 because of high demand for
 sophisticated technological research.
 Job prospects should be excellent.

Computer software engineers Much faster than average growth.
 and computer programmers Employment is expected to increase as
 businesses and other organizations
 continue to demand newer, more
 sophisticated software products. As a
 result of rapid growth, job prospects
 for software engineers should be
 excellent. The need to replace
 workers who leave the occupation is
 expected to generate numerous
 openings for programmers.

Computer support specialists Faster than average growth. As
 technology becomes more complex and
 has wider applications, these workers
 will be needed to resolve problems.
 Prospects should be good; jobseekers
 with a bachelor's degree and relevant
 work experience should have the best
 opportunities.

Computer systems analysts Much faster than average growth.
 Employment growth is projected as
 organizations continue to adopt the
 most efficient technologies and as
 the need for information security
 grows. Job prospects should be
 excellent.

Mathematicians Much faster than average growth.
 Technological advances are expected
 to expand applications of
 mathematics, leading to employment
 growth of mathematicians. Competition
 is expected to be keen. Jobseekers
 with a strong background in math and
 a related discipline should have the
 best prospects.

Operations research analysts Much faster than average growth. As
 technology advances and companies
 further emphasize efficiency, demand
 for operations research analysis
 should continue to grow. Excellent
 opportunities are expected,
 especially for those who have an
 advanced degree.

Statisticians About average growth. As data
 processing becomes faster and more
 efficient, employers are expected to
 need statisticians to analyze data.
 Projected employment growth for
 biostatisticians is related to the
 need for workers who can conduct
 research and clinical trials.

Architects, surveyors and cartographers

Architects, except landscape Faster than average growth. Changing
 and naval demographics, such as the
 population's aging and shifting to
 warmer States, should lead to
 employment growth for architects to
 design new buildings to accommodate
 these changes. Job competition should
 be keen.

Landscape architects Much faster than average growth.
 Employment should grow as new
 construction and redevelopment create
 more opportunities for these workers.
 Opportunities should be good, but
 entry-level jobseekers should expect
 keen competition for openings in
 large firms.

Surveyors, cartographers, Faster than average growth.
 photogrammetrists, and Increasing demand for geographic
 surveying and mapping information should be the main source
 technicians of employment growth. Jobseekers with
 a bachelor's degree and strong
 technical skills should have
 favorable prospects.

Engineers

 About average growth. Competitive
 pressures and advancing technology
 are expected to result in businesses
 hiring more engineers. Overall, job
 opportunities are expected to be
 good. Professional, scientific, and
 technical services industries should
 generate most of the employment
 growth.

Drafters and engineering technicians

Drafters Slower than average growth.
 Employment growth of drafters is
 expected to fall as computer-aided
 drafting systems allow other workers
 to complete tasks previously
 performed by drafters. Opportunities
 should be best for jobseekers who
 have at least 2 years of
 postsecondary training, strong
 technical skills, and experience with
 computer-aided drafting and design
 systems.

Engineering technicians Slower than average growth.
 Laborsaving efficiencies and the
 automation of many engineering
 support activities will limit the
 need for new engineering technicians.
 In general, opportunities should be
 best for jobseekers who have an
 associate degree or other
 postsecondary training in engineering
 technology.

Life scientists

Agricultural and food Faster than average growth. Job
 scientists growth is expected to stem primarily
 from efforts to increase the quantity
 and quality of food for a growing
 population and to balance output with
 protection and preservation of soil,
 water, and ecosystems. Opportunities
 should be good for agricultural and
 food scientists in almost all fields.

Biological scientists Much faster than average growth.
 Biotechnological research and
 development should continue to drive
 job growth. Doctoral degree holders
 are expected to face competition for
 research positions in academia.

Conservation scientists and About average growht. Increased
 foresters conservation efforts and continued
 pressure to maximize efficient use of
 natural resources are expected to
 lead to more jobs for conservation
 scientists. Jobseekers with a
 bachelor's degree should have the
 best prospects.

Medical scientists Much faster than average growth. New
 discoveries in biological and medical
 science are expected to create strong
 employment growth for these workers.
 Medical scientists with both doctoral
 and medical degrees should have the
 best opportunities.

Physical scientists

Atmospheric scientists Faster than average growth. As
 research leads to continuing
 improvements in weather forecasting,
 employment of these workers is
 projected to grow, especially in
 private firms that provide weather
 consulting services to climate-
 sensitive industries such as farming
 or insurance. Atmospheric scientists
 face keen competition.

Chemists and materials Slower than average growth.
 scientists Manufacturing companies' outsourcing
 of research and development and
 testing operations is expected to
 limit employment growth for these
 scientists. Most entry-level chemists
 should expect competition for jobs,
 particularly in declining chemical
 manufacturing industries.

Environmental scientists and Much faster than average growth. A
 specialists growing population and increased
 awareness of environmental concerns
 are expected to increase employment
 of environmental scientists. These
 workers should have good job
 prospects, particularly in State and
 local governments.

Geoscientists and hydrologists Faster than average growth. The need
 for energy services, environmental
 protection services, and responsible
 land and water management is expected
 to spur employment growth for these
 workers. Jobseekers who have a
 master's degree in geoscience should
 have excellent opportunities.

Physicists and astronomers Faster than average growth. An
 increased focus on basic research,
 particularly that related to energy,
 is expected to drive employment
 growth for these workers. Prospects
 should be favorable for physicists in
 applied research, development, and
 related technical fields and for
 astronomers in government and
 academia.

Social scientists and related occupations

Economists Slower than average growth. Although
 demand for economic analysis will
 grow, projected employment declines
 for economists in government sectors
 will temper overall growth.
 Jobseekers who have a graduate degree
 in economics should have the best
 prospects.

Market and survey researchers Much faster than average growth.
 Demand for market research is
 expected as businesses strive to
 increase sales and as governments
 rely on survey research to form
 public policy. Opportunities should
 be best for jobseekers who have a
 doctoral degree and strong
 quantitative skills.

Psychologists About average growth. Employment
 growth is expected due to increased
 emphasis on mental health in a
 variety of specializations, including
 school counseling, depression, and
 substance abuse. Jobseekers with a
 doctoral degree should have the best
 opportunities.

Urban and regional planners Faster than average growth. State and
 local governments are expected to
 hire urban and regional planners to
 help manage population growth and
 commercial development. Private
 businesses, mainly architecture and
 engineering firms, will also hire
 these workers to deal with storm
 water management, environmental
 regulation, and other concerns. Job
 prospects should be best for
 jobseekers with a master's degree.

Sociologists and political Much faster than average growth.
 scientists Employment growth of sociologists in
 a variety of fields is tied to
 expected demand for their research
 and analytical skills. Political
 scientists are expected to experience
 employment growth especially in
 nonprofit, political lobbying, and
 civic organizations. Opportunities
 should be best for jobseekers who
 have an advanced degree.

Social scientists, other Much faster than average growth.
 Anthropologists are projected to have
 significant employment growth in the
 management, scientific, and technical
 consulting industry. Expected job
 growth for archaeologists is
 associated with large-scale
 construction projects that must
 comply with Federal laws to preserve
 archaeological sites. Job competition
 is expected, especially for
 historians.

Science technicians

 About average growth. The continued
 growth of scientific and medical
 research and the development and
 manufacturing of technical products
 are expected to drive employment
 growth for these workers.
 Opportunities are expected to be best
 for graduates of applied science
 technology programs who are
 knowledgeable about equipment used in
 laboratories or production
 facilities.

Community and social services occupations

Counselors Faster than average growth.
 Increasing demand for services
 provided by counselors is expected to
 result in employment growth. But
 growth will vary by specialty and
 will be faster for mental health,
 substance abuse and behavioral
 disorder, and rehabilitation
 counselors than for counselors of
 other specialties. Opportunities
 should be favorable, particularly in
 rural areas.

Health educators Faster than average growth. As
 healthcare costs rise, insurance
 companies, businesses, and
 governments are expected to hire
 health educators to teach the public
 how to avoid and detect illnesses.
 Opportunities should be favorable,
 especially for those who have gained
 experience through volunteer work or
 internships.

Probation officers and Faster than average growth. Many
 correctional treatment States are expected to emphasize
 specialists alternatives to incarceration, such
 as probation. As a result, employment
 growth should be strong for these
 workers. Opportunities should be
 excellent.

Social and human service Much faster than average growth. As
 assistants the elderly population grows, demand
 for the services provided by these
 workers is expected to increase.
 Opportunities are expected to be
 excellent, particularly for
 jobseekers with some postsecondary
 education, such as a certificate or
 associate degree in a related
 subject.

Social workers Faster than average growth. The
 rapidly increasing elderly population
 is expected to spur demand for social
 services. Job prospects should be
 favorable because of the need to
 replace the many workers who are
 leaving the occupation permanently.

Leqal occupations

Court reporters Faster than average growth. The
 continuing need for transcripts of
 legal proceedings, the growing demand
 for TV and other broadcast
 captioning, and the need to provide
 translating services for the deaf and
 the hard of hearing are expected to
 create jobs. Prospects should be
 excellent.

Judges, magistrates, and other Slower than average growth. Budget
 judicial workers pressures are expected to limit the
 hiring of new judges, particularly in
 Federal courts. Alternatives to
 litigation are usually faster and
 less expensive, spurring employment
 growth for other judicial workers,
 such as arbitrators, mediators, and
 conciliators.

Lawyers About average growth. Growth in both
 population and business activity is
 expected to result in more civil
 disputes and criminal cases and,
 thus, employment growth for lawyers.
 This growth is expected to be
 constrained, however, as paralegals
 and other workers perform some of the
 tasks previously done by lawyers.
 Keen competition is expected.

Paralegals and legal Much faster than average growth.
 assistants Increased demand for accessible,
 cost-efficient legal services is
 expected to increase employment for
 paralegals, who may perform more
 tasks previously done by lawyers.
 Keen competition is expected.
 Experienced, formally trained
 paralegals should have the best job
 prospects.

Education, training, library, and museum occupations

Archivists, curators, and Much faster than average growth.
 museum technicians Employment for archivists is expected
 to increase as public and private
 organizations need categorization of
 and access to increasing volumes of
 records and information. Employment
 growth for curators and museum
 technicians should be strong as
 museum attendance levels remain high.
 Keen competition is expected.

Instructional coordinators Much faster than average growth.
 Continued efforts to improve
 educational standards are expected to
 result in more new jobs for these
 workers. Opportunities should be best
 for jobseekers who train teachers to
 use classroom technology and who have
 experience in reading, mathematics,
 and science.

Librarians About average growth. Growth in the
 number of librarians is expected to
 be limited by government budget
 constraints and the increasing use of
 electronic resources. Although many
 openings are expected, there will be
 competition for jobs in some regions.

Library technicians and About average growth. Budgetary
 library assistants constraints are among the reasons job
 growth may slow; however, continued
 automation of library systems should
 allow these workers to perform some
 tasks previously done by librarians,
 thereby increasing employment of
 technicians. Opportunities should be
 best for technicians with specialized
 training.

Teacher assistants About average growth. An increase in
 the numbers of students in special
 education and students who are not
 native speakers of English is
 expected to create jobs for teacher
 assistants. Opportunities should be
 favorable.

Teachers-adult literacy and Faster than average growth. As the
 remedial education need for educated workers increases,
 so will the need for teachers to
 instruct them. In addition, there
 should be employment growth for
 teachers to help immigrants and
 others improve their English language
 skills. Opportunities should be
 favorable.

Teachers--postsecondary Faster than average growth.
 Enrollments in post-secondary
 institutions are expected to continue
 rising as more people attend college
 and as workers return to school to
 update their skills. Opportunities
 for part-time or temporary positions
 should be favorable, but significant
 competition exists for tenure-track
 positions.

Teachers--preschool, except Faster than average growth. Continued
 special education emphasis on early childhood education
 is increasing the employment of
 preschool teachers. The need to
 replace workers who leave the
 occupation permanently should create
 good job opportunities.

Teachers--kindergarten, About average growth. Enrollment over
 elementary, middle, and the projections decade is expected to
 secondary grow more slowly than in recent
 years. Prospects are usually better
 in urban and rural areas, for
 bilingual teachers, and for math and
 science teachers.

Teachers--self-enrichment Much faster than average growth.
 education Demand for self-enrichment education
 will increase as more people embrace
 lifelong learning or seek to acquire
 or improve skills that make them more
 attractive to prospective employers.
 Opportunities should be favorable.

Teachers--special education Faster than average growth.
 Employment of these teachers is
 expected to rise as more students
 qualify for special education
 services. Excellent job prospects are
 expected.

Teachers--vocational About average growth. Employment
 growth for these workers should arise
 from continued increases in school
 enrollments, but growth will be
 limited by the focus on traditional
 academic subjects. Prospects are
 expected to be favorable as workers
 leave the occupation permanently.

Art and design occupations

Artists and related workers About average growth. Demand for
 digital and multimedia artwork is
 expected to drive growth. Competition
 should be keen for certain kinds of
 jobs. Multimedia artists and
 animators should have better
 opportunities than other artists.

Commercial and industrial About average growth. An increase in
 designers demand for new and upgraded products
 should lead to job growth for these
 workers, but this growth is expected
 to be tempered by the use of design
 firms abroad. Keen competition is
 expected.

Fashion designers Little or no change. Some job growth
 is expected due to an increasing
 population; however, many jobs in
 apparel manufacturing will continue
 to move abroad. Competition should be
 keen.

Floral designers Moderate decline. Employment of
 floral designers is expected to
 decline as people purchase fewer
 elaborate flower decorations. Job
 opportunities should be good.

Graphic designers About average growth. Advertising
 firms that specialize in digital and
 interactive designs are expected to
 drive growth, but declines in print
 publishing will temper this growth.
 Competition is expected to be keen.

Interior designers Faster than average growth. A growing
 interest in interior design by both
 homeowners and businesses is expected
 to lead to employment increases in
 this occupation. Competition is
 expected to be keen, and jobseekers
 with formal training should have the
 best opportunities.

Entertainers and performers, sports and, related occupations

Actors, producers, and About average growth. Employment
 directors growth is expected to be driven by
 expanding film and television
 operations and an increase in
 production of online and mobile video
 content. Keen competition is
 expected.

Athletes, coaches, umpires, Much faster than average growth.
 and related workers Employment is expected to grow as
 more people participate in organized
 sports. Keen competition is expected
 for many jobs, such as professional
 athletes. Opportunities should be
 best for part-time umpires, referees,
 and other sports officials at the
 high school level.

Dancers and choreographers Slower than average growth. The
 public's interest in dance is
 expected to sustain employment in
 large and mid-size dance companies,
 but limited funding is expected to
 curb growth in small companies.
 Competition should continue to be
 keen.

Musicians, singers, and About average growth. Most new
 related workers wage-and-salary jobs are expected to
 be in religious organizations.
 Self-employed musicians should have
 slower than average employment
 growth. Keen competition is expected
 for full-time positions.

Media and communications-related occupations

Announcers Moderate decline. Technology is
 expected to continue increasing
 announcers' productivity in editing
 material and performing other
 off-air tasks. This factor, combined
 with broadcaster consolidation,
 should limit employment of
 announcers. Keen competition is
 expected.

Authors, writers, and editors About average growth. Projected job
 growth for these workers stems from
 increased use of online media and
 growing demand for Web-based
 information. But print publishing is
 expected to continue weakening. Job
 competition should be keen.

Broadcast and sound About average growth. Employment
 engineering technicians and growth is expected to vary. Demand
 radio operators for audio-visual equipment is
 growing, which should lead to
 employment increases for audio and
 video equipment technicians. But
 labor productivity increases and
 broadcast industry consolidation are
 expected to limit growth in
 broadcasting. Job prospects should be
 best in small cities and towns.

Interpreters and translators Much faster than average growth.
 Globalization and large increases in
 the number of non-native English
 speakers in the United States are
 expected to lead to employment
 increases for these workers. Job
 prospects vary by specialty and
 language.

News analysts, reporters, and Moderate decline. Consolidation in
 correspondents publishing and broadcasting is
 expected to result in job losses for
 these workers. Competition is
 expected to be keen at major
 newspapers and stations; smaller
 newspapers and stations should
 provide better opportunities.

Photographers About average growth. Employment for
 some photographers is expected to
 increase as online publication of
 magazines expands, but other
 photographers are expected to be
 adversely affected by amateur
 photography and increased use of
 copyright-free photos. Competition
 should be keen.

Public relations specialists Much faster than average growth. As
 the business environment becomes
 increasingly globalized, the need for
 good public relations and
 communications is growing rapidly.
 Opportunities should be best for
 workers with knowledge of more than
 one language.

Technical writers Faster than average growth. Fast
 growth is expected because of the
 need for technical writers to explain
 an increasing number of scientific
 and technical products. Prospects
 should be good, especially for
 workers with strong technical and
 communication skills. Competition
 will be keen for some jobs.

Television, video, and motion About average growth. Projected
 picture camera operators employment growth will be driven by
 and editors increases in the motion picture and
 video industry; however, that growth
 should be tempered by automation in
 broadcasting. Competition is expected
 to be keen.

Health diagnosing and treating practitioners

Audiologists Much faster than average growth.
 Employment of audiologists is
 expected to grow as the population
 ages and more care is needed for the
 elderly, who often have problems with
 hearing and balance. Job prospects
 should be favorable for jobseekers
 who have a doctorate in audiology.

Chiropractors Much faster than average growth.
 Projected growth stems from
 increasing consumer demand for
 alternative healthcare. Job prospects
 for new chiropractors are expected to
 be good, especially for those who
 enter a multidisciplined practice.

Dentists Faster than average growth. An
 increase in the elderly
 population--who often need
 complicated dental work--and expanded
 insurance coverage for dental
 procedures are expected to create job
 growth. Good prospects are expected
 from the need to replace the large
 number of dentists who are retiring.

Dietitians and nutritionists About average growth. Employment
 growth is expected to result from an
 increasing emphasis on disease
 prevention through improved diet. Job
 opportunities should be best for
 dietitians and nutritionists with
 specialized training, an advanced
 degree, or certifications beyond
 minimum State requirements.

Occupational therapists Much faster than average growth.
 Employment growth for occupational
 therapists should continue as the
 population ages and better medical
 technology increases the survival
 rates of people who become injured or
 ill. Job opportunities are expected
 be good.

Optometrists Much faster than average growth. An
 aging population and increasing
 insurance coverage for vision care
 are expected to lead to employment
 growth for optometrists. Excellent
 opportunities are expected.

Pharmacists Faster than average growth. The
 increasing numbers of middle-aged and
 elderly people--who use more
 prescription drugs than younger
 people--should continue to spur
 employment growth for pharmacists.
 Job prospects are expected to be
 excellent.

Physical therapists Much faster than average growth.
 Employment of physical therapists is
 expected to increase as the
 population ages and as better medical
 technology increases survival rates
 of people who become injured or ill.
 Job opportunities should be good in
 settings that treat primarily the
 elderly.

Physician assistants Much faster than average growth.
 Employment growth for these workers
 should be driven by an aging
 population and by healthcare
 providers' increasing use of
 physician assistants to contain
 costs. Opportunities should be good,
 particularly in underserved areas.

Physicians and surgeons Much faster than average growth.
 Employment growth is expected to be
 tied to increases in the aging
 population and in new medical
 technologies that allow more maladies
 to be diagnosed and treated. Job
 prospects should be very good,
 particularly in underserved areas.

Podiatrists About average growth. Projected
 employment growth reflects a more
 active, older population that is
 sustaining a rising number of foot
 injuries. Opportunities for
 entry-level jobseekers should be good
 for qualified applicants.

Radiation therapists Much faster than average growth. The
 increasing number of elderly people,
 who are more likely than younger
 people to need radiation treatment,
 is expected to lead to employment
 growth for these workers. Prospects
 are expected to be good; jobseekers
 with a bachelor's degree should have
 the best opportunities.

Recreational therapists Faster than average growth.
 Employment growth for recreational
 therapists is expected to continue as
 the population ages and better
 medical technology increases the
 survival rates of people who become
 injured or ill.

Registered nurses Much faster than average growth.
 Employment growth for registered
 nurses will be driven by the medical
 needs of an aging population. In
 addition, registered nurses are
 expected to provide more primary care
 as a low-cost alternative to
 physician-provided care. Job
 opportunities should be excellent.

Respiratory therapists Much faster than average growth.
 Growth of the elderly population is
 expected to increase employment for
 these workers, especially as they
 take on additional duties related to
 case management, disease prevention,
 and emergency care. Opportunities are
 expected to be very good.

Speech-language pathologists Faster than average growth. The aging
 population, better medical technology
 that increases the survival rates of
 people who become injured or ill, and
 growing enrollments in elementary and
 secondary schools are expected to
 increase employment of these workers.
 Job prospects are expected to be
 favorable.

Veterinarians Much faster than average growth.
 Growth in the pet population and pet
 owners' increased will-ingness to pay
 for intensive veterinary care and
 treatment are projected to create
 significantly more jobs for
 veterinarians. Excellent job
 opportunities are expected.

Health technologists and technicians

Athletic trainers Much faster than average growth.
 Employment growth is expected to be
 concentrated in the healthcare
 industry, as athletic training is
 increasingly used to prevent illness
 and injury. Job prospects for
 athletic trainers should also be good
 in high schools. Keen competition is
 expected for positions with
 professional and college sports
 teams.

Cardiovascular technologists Much faster than average growth. An
 and technicians aging population and the continued
 prevalence of heart disease will
 drive employment growth for
 cardiovascular technologists and
 technicians. Prospects should be the
 best for jobseekers who have multiple
 credentials.

Clinical laboratory Faster than average growth.
 technologists and Employment of these workers is
 technicians expected to rise as the volume of
 laboratory tests continues to
 increase with population growth and
 the development of new tests.
 Excellent opportunities are expected.

Dental hygienists Much faster than average growth. An
 increase in the number of older
 people and a growing emphasis on
 preventative dental care are expected
 to create jobs. To meet increased
 demand, dental hygienists will
 perform some services previously done
 by dentists. Job prospects should be
 favorable but will vary by geographic
 location.

Diagnostic medical Faster than average growth. The aging
 sonographers population's need for safe and
 cost-effective diagnostic imaging
 treatment is expected to spur
 employment growth. Prospects should
 be good for jobseekers who have
 multiple professional credentials.

Emergency medical technicians About average growth. An aging
 and paramedics population is expected to drive
 employment growth in these
 occupations. Opportunities should be
 favorable, especially for jobseekers
 with advanced certification.

Licensed practical and Much faster than average growth. An
 licensed vocational nurses aging population is expected to boost
 demand for nursing services. Job
 prospects are expected to be very
 good, especially in employment
 settings that serve older
 populations.

Medical records and health Much faster than average growth.
 information technicians Employment of these workers is
 expected to grow as the number of
 elderly--a demographic group with a
 higher incidence of injury and
 illness--increases. Job prospects
 should be best for technicians who
 have strong skills in technology and
 computer software.

Nuclear medicine technologists Faster than average growth. Job
 growth is expected to result from
 advancements in nuclear medicine and
 an increase in the number of older
 people requiring diagnostic
 procedures. Competition is expected
 to be keen.

Occupational health and About average growth. These workers
 safety specialists will be needed to ensure workplace
 safety in response to changing
 hazards, regulations, public
 expectations, and technology.

Occupational health and Faster than average growth. Fast
 safety technicians growth is expected as some employers
 contain costs by hiring more
 technicians and fewer specialists to
 ensure workplace safety in response
 to changing hazards, regulations,
 public expectations, and technology.

Opticians, dispensing About average growth. Demand for
 vision correction will increase as
 the population ages. But projected
 employment growth for these workers
 should be moderated by the increasing
 prevalence of laser vision-correcting
 surgery. Very good job prospects are
 expected.

Pharmacy technicians and aides Much faster than average growth.
 Growth in the population of
 middle-aged and elderly people--who
 use more prescription drugs than
 younger people--should spur
 employment increases for these
 workers. Job prospects are expected
 to be good.

Radiologic technologists and Faster than average growth. As the
 technicians population grows and ages, demand for
 diagnostic imaging is expected to
 increase. Jobseekers who have
 knowledge of multiple technologies
 should have the best prospects.

Surgical technologists Much faster than average growth.
 Employment growth for these workers
 is expected as a growing and aging
 population has more surgeries and as
 advances allow technologists to
 assist surgeons more often. Job
 opportunities should be best for
 technologists who are certified.

Veterinary technologists and Much faster than average growth.
 technicians Increases in the pet population and
 in advanced veterinary care are
 expected to create employment growth
 for these workers. Excellent job
 opportunities are expected.

Other professional and related occupations

Epidemiologists Faster than average growth.
 Heightened awareness of bioterrorism
 and rare but infectious diseases are
 expected to spur employment growth
 for these workers. Excellent
 opportunities are expected.

Respiratory therapy Little or no change. Employment
 technicians growth for these technicians is
 expected to be limited because most
 respiratory-care work is done by
 respiratory therapists. Keen
 competition is expected.

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Service occupations

Healthcare support occupations

Dental assistants 295,300 105,600 36
 (*)

Home health aides and personal 1,738,800 836,700 48
 and home care aides (*) (*)

Massage therapists 122,400 23,200 19

Medical assistants 483,600 163,900 34
 (*)

Medical transcriptionists 105,200 11,700 11

Nursing and psychiatric aides 1,532,300 279,600 18
 (*)

Occupational therapist 34,400 10,300 30
 assistants and aides (*)

Physical therapist assistants 109,900 37,900 35
 and aides (*)

Protective service occupations

Correctional officers 518,200 48,300 9

Fire fighters 365,600 62,100 17

Police and detectives 883,600 84,700 10

Private detectives and 45,500 10,000 22
 investigators (*)

Security guards and gaming 1,086,000 153,600 14
 surveillance officers

Food preparation and serving related occupations

Chefs, head cooks, and food 941,600 55,400 6
 preparation and serving
 supervisors

Cooks and food preparation 2,958,100 191,500 6
 workers

Food and beverage serving and 7,652,400 760,700 10
 related workers (*)

Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations

Building cleaning workers 4,139,000 204,300 5
 (*)

Grounds maintenance workers 1,520,600 269,200 18
 (*)

Pest control workers 67,500 10,300 15

Personal care and service occupations

Animal care and service 220,400 45,500 21
 workers (*)

Barbers, cosmetologists, and 821,900 165,500 20
 other personal appearance (*)
 workers

Child care workers 1,301,900 142,100 11

Fitness workers 261,100 76,800 29
 (*)

Flight attendants 98,700 8,000 8

Gaming services occupations 178,700 25,700 14

Recreation workers 327,500 48,200 15

Other service occupations

Fire inspectors and 16,600 1,500 9
 investigators

Makeup artists, theatrical and 2,800 500 17
 performance

Occupation Employment prospects

Service occupations

Healthcare support occupations

Dental assistants Much faster than average growth. An
 aging population and increased
 emphasis on preventative dental care
 will create more demand for dental
 services, and dentists are expected
 to hire more assistants to perform
 routine tasks. Job prospects should
 be excellent.

Home health aides and personal Much faster than average growth.
 and home care aides Growth is expected to stem from a
 rise in the number of elderly people,
 an age group that relies increasingly
 on home care for assistance with
 daily activities. This growth,
 together with the need to replace
 workers who leave the occupation
 permanently, should result in
 excellent job prospects.

Massage therapists Faster than average growth. Growing
 demand for massage services to help
 improve health and wellness is
 expected to create jobs for massage
 therapists. Opportunities for
 entry-level workers should be good.
 Jobseekers with experience and
 licensure or certification should
 have the best prospects.

Medical assistants Much faster than average growth.
 Technological advances in medicine
 and the aging of the population will
 create demand for healthcare, and
 doctors are expected to hire more
 assistants in response. Prospects
 should be excellent, especially for
 job-seekers with certification.

Medical transcriptionists About average growth. An aging
 population is expected to need more
 medical care, leading to more medical
 records and creating employment
 growth in this occupation.
 Opportunities should be good,
 especially for jobseekers who are
 certified.

Nursing and psychiatric aides Faster than average growth.
 Employment of nursing aides,
 orderlies, and attendants is expected
 to grow in response to the long-term
 care needs of an increasing elderly
 population. Employment of psychiatric
 aides is projected to grow more
 slowly than average due, in part, to
 an ongoing trend toward outpatient
 psychiatric treatment. Overall, job
 opportunities for nursing and
 psychiatric aides are expected to be
 excellent.

Occupational therapist Much faster than average growth.
 assistants and aides Employment growth for occupational
 therapist assistants and aides should
 continue as the population ages and
 better medical technology increases
 the survival rates of people who
 become injured or ill. Job prospects
 should be very good for assistants
 who have credentials.

Physical therapist assistants Much faster than average growth.
 and aides Projected growth stems from an
 expected increase in the elderly
 population and better medical
 technology that increases the
 survival rates of people who become
 injured or ill. Job opportunities
 should be good in settings that treat
 the elderly.

Protective service occupations

Correctional officers About average growth. Employment
 growth is expected to stem from
 population increases and a
 corresponding rise in the prison
 population. Favorable job
 opportunities are expected.

Fire fighters Faster than average growth. Most job
 growth will stem from the conversion
 of volunteer fire fighting positions
 into paid positions. Jobseekers are
 expected to face keen competition.
 Those who have completed some fire
 fighter education at a community
 college and have EMT or paramedic
 certification should have the best
 prospects.

Police and detectives About average growth. Population
 growth is the main source of demand
 for police services. Overall,
 opportunities in local police
 departments should be favorable for
 qualified applicants.

Private detectives and Much faster than average growth.
 investigators Growth in employment of private
 detectives and investigators
 should result from heightened
 confidentiality and security concerns
 and from increased litigation. Keen
 competition is expected for most
 jobs.

Security guards and gaming Faster than average growth. Concern
 surveillance officers about crime, vandalism, and terrorism
 are expected to result in increased
 demand for security services. This
 increased demand, along with the need
 to replace workers leaving the
 occupation permanently, should result
 in favorable iob opportunities.

Food preparation and serving related occupations

Chefs, head cooks, and food Slower than average growth. Consumer
 preparation and serving demand for convenience and a growing
 supervisors variety of dining venues are expected
 to create some jobs, but most
 openings are expected to arise from
 the need to replace workers who leave
 the occupation. Competition should be
 keen for jobs at upscale restaurants.

Cooks and food preparation Slower than average growth. New jobs
 workers are expected to arise as people
 continue to eat out and purchase
 ready-made food, but growth will be
 tempered as restaurants and
 quick-service eating places find more
 efficient ways to prepare meals.
 Opportunities should be good.

Food and beverage serving and About average growth. Job growth is
 related workers projected due to an expanding
 population and the continued
 popularity of dining out.
 Opportunities should be excellent.

Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations

Building cleaning workers Slower than average growth.
 Employment of building cleaning
 workers should grow, although slowly,
 as the number of buildings in
 operation increases. The need to
 replace workers who leave the
 occupation should create good job
 prospects.

Grounds maintenance workers Faster than average growth. Demand
 for lawn care and landscaping
 services is expected to grow,
 resulting in employment growth for
 these workers. Job prospects are
 expected to be good. Opportunities
 for year-round work should be best in
 regions with temperate climates.

Pest control workers Faster than average growth. Demand
 for pest control services should grow
 as consumers desire improved living
 conditions and as the population
 increases in warmer States, where
 pests are more prevalent. Prospects
 should be good.

Personal care and service occupations

Animal care and service Much faster than average growth. Pet
 workers owners purchasing more
 services--including grooming,
 boarding, and training--is expected
 to lead to employment growth for
 animal care and service workers.
 Emphasis on reducing animal abuse
 should also increase their employment
 in animal shelters. Excellent
 opportunities are expected.

Barbers, cosmetologists, and Much faster than average growth. A
 other personal appearance larger population and increasing
 workers demand for personal appearante
 services, especially skin care, are
 expected to create jobs for these
 workers. Prospects should be good,
 especially for jobseekers who have
 formal training.

Child care workers About average growth. Increased
 emphasis on early childhood education
 should lead to employment growth for
 these workers. But growth is expected
 to be moderated by relatively slow
 growth in the population of children
 under age 5. The need to replace
 workers who leave the occupation
 permanently should create good job
 opportunities.

Fitness workers Much faster than average growth.
 Employment growth for these workers
 is expected due to increased concern
 about health and physical fitness.
 People who have degrees in
 fitness-related subjects should have
 better opportunities, and trainers
 who incorporate new technology and
 wellness issues as part of their
 services may be more sought after.

Flight attendants About average growth. As the
 population grows and the economy
 expands, expected increases in the
 volume of air passenger traffic will
 lead to employment growth for flight
 attendants. Competition is expected
 to be keen. Jobseekers who have a
 bachelor's degree and relevant
 experience should have the best
 prospects.

Gaming services occupations Faster than average growth. Expansion
 of existing facilities and easing of
 State government restrictions on
 gaming facilities are expected to
 drive employment growth in gaming
 occupations. Keen competition is
 expected. Prospects should be best
 for jobseekers who have experience,
 postsecondary training, and customer
 service skills.

Recreation workers Faster than average growth. Growth
 will stem from people spending more
 time and money on recreation, but
 budget constraints may limit the
 number of new jobs. Applicants for
 part-time, seasonal, and temporary
 recreation jobs should have good
 opportunities, but competition will
 remain keen for full-time career
 positions.

Other service occupations

Fire inspectors and About average growth. Employment of
 investigators fire inspectors and investigators is
 projected to grow along with growth
 of the population. Job competition is
 expected to be keen. Those who have
 some post-secondary education or
 relevant experience should have an
 advantage.

Makeup artists, theatrical and Faster than average growth. Steady
 performance growth in the entertainment industry
 should result in increased employment
 for these workers. Competition should
 be keen. Job openings will be
 concentrated in areas that have many
 media production companies, such as
 Los Angeles and New York.

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Sales and related occupations

Advertising sales agents 166,800 12,100 7

Cashiers 3,550,000 125,500 4

Demonstrators and product 102,800 7,300 7
 promoters

Insurance sales agents 434,800 51,600 12

Models 2,200 400 16

Real estate brokers and sales 517,800 74,300 14
 agents

Retail salespersons 4,489,200 374,700 8
 (*)

Sales engineers 78,000 6,900 9

Sales representatives, 1,973,200 143,200 7
 wholesale and manufacturing

Sales worker supervisors 2,192,300 112,800 5

Securities, commodities, and 317,200 29,600 9
 financial services sales
 agents

Travel agents 105,300 -1,200 -1

Other sales and related occupations

Counter and rental clerks 448,200 13,700 3

Occupation Employment prospects

Sales and related occupations

Advertising sales agents About average growth. Continued
 growth of media outlets is expected
 to generate demand for advertising
 sales. Opportunities for entry-level
 workers should be good, especially
 for jobseekers who have sales
 experience and a college degree.

Cashiers Slower than average growth. The
 increased use of self-service
 checkout systems and the rising
 popularity of online shopping are
 expected to limit employment growth
 for cashiers. But opportunities
 should continue to be good because of
 the need to replace workers who leave
 the occupation.

Demonstrators and product About average growth. Employment
 promoters growth should be driven by increases
 in the number and size of trade shows
 and by greater use of these workers
 in retail establishments for in-store
 promotions. Job openings should
 be plentiful.

Insurance sales agents About average growth. Projected
 employment increases stem from the
 growth and aging of the population.
 But these increases will be tempered
 by insurance carriers attempting to
 contain costs by relying on
 independent agents rather than
 employees. Job opportunities should
 be best for college graduates with
 good interpersonal skills.

Models Faster than average growth. Expected
 growth in employment will be driven
 by continued use of models to
 advertise products. Keen competition
 for jobs is expected because of the
 perceived glamour of the occupation.

Real estate brokers and sales Faster than average growth. A growing
 agents population is expected to require the
 services of real estate agents and
 brokers, creating more jobs for these
 workers. People who are well-trained,
 ambitious, and socially and
 professionally active in their
 communities should have the best
 prospects.

Retail salespersons About average growth. As the
 population grows and retail sales
 increase, employment of these workers
 is expected to grow. Opportunities
 are expected to be good.

Sales engineers About average growth. Projected job
 growth will stem from the increasing
 variety and technical nature of goods
 and services to be sold. Competition
 is expected. Prospects should be best
 for jobseekers with excellent
 interpersonal skills and
 communication, math, and science
 aptitude.

Sales representatives, About average growth. Continued
 wholesale and manufacturing expansion in the variety and number
 of goods sold is expected to lead to
 additional jobs for these workers.
 Prospects should be best for
 jobseekers with a college degree,
 technical expertise, and
 interpersonal skills.

Sales worker supervisors Slower than average growth. Limited
 job growth is expected as retailers
 increase the responsibilities of
 existing sales worker supervisors and
 as the retail industry grows slowly
 overall. Competition is expected.
 Jobseekers with college degrees and
 retail experience should have the
 best prospects.

Securities, commodities, and About average growth. Consolidation
 financial services sales of the financial industry is expected
 agents to inhibit employment growth.
 Individuals' ability to manage their
 own investments online is likely to
 reduce the need for brokers. Job
 competition should be keen.

Travel agents Little or no change. Demand for the
 services of travel agents is expected
 to decline with the increasing
 ability of travelers to arrange their
 own trips online. But demand for some
 specialized services is expected to
 grow. Jobseekers with formal training
 should have the best opportunities.

Other sales and related occupations

Counter and rental clerks Slower than average growth. Trends
 such as online shopping may impede
 employment growth for these workers.
 But because these occupations usually
 require personal contact, they are
 difficult to automate. Opportunities
 are expected to be favorable.

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Office and administrative support occupations

Financial clerks

Bill and account collectors 411,000 79,500 19

Bookkeeping, accounting, and 2,063,800 212,400 10
 auditing clerks (*)

Gaming cage workers 39,200 -4,100 -10

Information and record clerks

Customer service 2,252,400 399,500 18
 representatives (*)

Receptionists and information 1,139,200 172,900 15
 clerks

Material recording, scheduling, dispatching, and distributing
occupations

Cargo and freight agents 85,900 20,600 24
 (*)

Couriers and messengers 122,400 -400 0

Postal Service mail carriers 343,300 -3,900 -1

Shipping, receiving, and 750,500 -49,300 -7
 traffic clerks

Miscellaneous office and administrative support occupations

Desktop publishers 26,400 -5,900 -23

Office clerks, general 3,024,400 358,700 12
 (*)

Secretaries and administrative 4,348,100 471,600 11
 assistants (*)

Other office and administrative support occupations

Billing and posting clerks and 528,800 80,800 15
 machine operators

Brokerage clerks 67,600 -1,800 -3

Communications equipment 181,600 -18,200 -10
 operators

Computer operators 110,000 -20,500 -19

Credit authorizers, checkers, 63,800 1,800 3
 and clerks

Data entry and information 426,200 -25,500 -6
 processing workers

Dispatchers, except police, 195,700 -5,000 -3
 fire, and ambulance

Eligibility interviewers, 119,500 11,000 9
 government programs

File clerks 212,200 -49,600 -23

Hotel, motel, and resort desk 230,200 31,500 14
 clerks

Human resources assistants, 169,700 -9,700 -6
 except payroll and
 timekeeping

Interviewers, except 233,400 36,400 16
 eligibility and loan

Loan interviewers and clerks 210,400 9,100 4

Meter readers, utilities 45,300 -9,100 -20

Office and administrative 1,457,200 160,300 11
 support worker supervisors
 and managers

Order clerks 245,700 -64,200 -26

Payroll and timekeeping clerks 208,700 -10,900 -5

Police, fire, and ambulance 99,900 17,800 18
 dispatchers

Postal Service clerks 75,800 -13,700 -18

Postal Service mail sorters, 179,900 -54,500 -30
 processors, and processing
 machine operators

Procurement clerks 81,500 4,800 6

Production, planning, and 283,500 4,300 2
 expediting clerks

Reservation and 168,300 13,600 8
 transportation ticket
 agents and travel clerks

Stock clerks and order fillers 1,858,800 134,400 7

Tellers 600,500 37,500 6

Weighers, measurers, checkers, 71,900 -9,400 -13
 and samplers, recordkeeping

Occupation Employment prospects

Office and administrative support occupations

Financial clerks

Bill and account collectors Faster than average growth. New jobs
 are projected to be created in
 industries in which delinquent
 accounts are common, such as
 healthcare and financial services.
 Opportunities also should be
 favorable. Jobseekers who have
 related experience should have the
 best prospects.

Bookkeeping, accounting, and About average growth. Overall
 auditing clerks economic expansion will result in
 more financial transactions and other
 activities requiring recordkeeping,
 leading to expected employment growth
 for these workers. Job openings will
 be plentiful, including many
 opportunities for temporary and
 part-time work.

Gaming cage workers Rapid decline. Employment declines
 are expected as casinos increasingly
 automate transactions, reducing the
 need for these workers. Keen
 competition is expected. Jobseekers
 with good math and customer service
 skills, casino experience, and some
 background in accounting or
 bookkeeping should have the best
 opportunities.

Information and record clerks

Customer service Faster than average growth.
 representatives Businesses are expected to place
 increasing emphasis on customer
 relations, resulting in increased
 employment for these workers.
 Prospects are expected to be good,
 particularly for jobseekers who are
 fluent in more than one language.

Receptionists and information Faster than average growth. Although
 clerks technology makes these workers more
 productive, many new jobs are
 expected as clerical work is
 consolidated and involves more tasks.
 Employment growth is expected in
 offices of physicians and other
 health practitioners and in the legal
 services, personal care services,
 construction, and management and
 technical consulting industries.
 Plentiful opportunities are expected.

Material recording, scheduling, dispatching, and distributing
occupations

Cargo and freight agents Much faster than average growth. More
 agents should be needed to handle the
 growing number of shipments resulting
 from expected increases in cargo
 traffic. Job prospects should be
 good.

Couriers and messengers Little or no change. The need for
 document delivery services is
 expected to continue lessening due to
 widespread use of computers and the
 Internet. But some demand should
 arise, especially for items that
 cannot be sent electronically. Most
 openings are expected to be in large
 urban areas.

Postal Service mail carriers Little or no change. Declining mail
 volume, along with automation, is
 expected to offset employment growth
 driven by the need to provide
 mail-delivery services to a growing
 population. Keen competition is
 expected. Opportunities are expected
 to be best in areas experiencing
 population growth.

Shipping, receiving, and Moderate decline. The use of more
 traffic clerks advanced logistics and inventory
 software is expected to enhance
 productivity and lower employment for
 these workers. Most job openings are
 expected to arise from the need to
 replace existing workers who leave
 the occupation permanently.

Miscellaneous office and administrative support occupations

Desktop publishers Rapid decline. Availability of
 user-friendly software is expected
 to make desktop publishing by
 nonprofessionals more common,
 reducing employment in this
 occupation. Job prospects should be
 best for those with experience.

Office clerks, general About average growth. Employment
 growth is expected to be spurred by
 new technology that allows these
 clerks to perform tasks previously
 done by specialists. Numerous
 opportunities are expected.

Secretaries and administrative About average growth. Projected
 assistants employment growth varies by
 occupational specialty. Faster than
 average growth is expected for
 medical secretaries and legal
 secretaries; average growth for
 executive secretaries and
 administrative assistants; and slower
 than average growth for secretaries
 other than legal, medical, or
 executive, who account for most of
 the workers in these specialties.
 Many opportunities are expected.

Other office and administrative support occupations

Billing and posting clerks and Faster than average growth.
 machine operators Employment growth is projected to
 stem from an increasing number of
 transactions, especially in the
 rapidly growing healthcare industry.
 Prospects should be good.

Brokerage clerks Moderate decline. Industry
 consolidation and automation are
 expected to reduce employment growth
 for these workers. Keen competition
 is expected.

Communications equipment Rapid decline. Automation, the
 operators movement of jobs abroad, and the
 proliferation of cell phones are
 expected to reduce employment for
 these workers. But job prospects
 should be favorable because of the
 need to replace existing workers who
 leave the occupation permanently.

Computer operators Rapid decline. Advances in technology
 will make many of the duties
 performed by these workers obsolete.
 Opportunities should be best for
 those who have formal computer
 education, familiarity with a variety
 of operating systems, and current
 knowledge of technology.

Credit authorizers, checkers, Slower than average growth.
 and clerks Employment growth is expected to be
 limited because technology continues
 to improve efficiency in processing
 credit applications. Some growth
 should result, however, from
 increased risk aversion and closer
 attention to credit policies by
 lenders. Prospects should be good.

Data entry and information Moderate decline. Improved
 processing workers technologies and an increased
 expectation that most people perform
 their own data entry and information
 processing tasks are projected to
 reduce employment of these workers.
 Job prospects should be best for
 those who have strong technical
 skills.

Dispatchers, except police, Moderate decline. Increasing worker
 fire, and ambulance productivity is expected to cause a
 decline in employment, but this
 decline may be offset, somewhat, by
 population growth. Opportunities
 should be favorable.

Eligibility interviewers, About average growth. As the
 government programs population ages, retires, and becomes
 eligible for benefits and programs,
 employment in this occupation is
 expected to increase. But employment
 growth may be tempered by a trend
 toward automated services, such as
 online application. Job opportunities
 are expected to be favorable.

File clerks Rapid decline. Employment is expected
 to decline due to productivity gains
 from office automation and the
 consolidation of clerical jobs. But
 favorable opportunities are expected,
 due to the need to replace existing
 workers who leave the occupation.
 Prospects should be best for
 jobseekers who have good typing or
 secretarial skills and are familiar
 with office machinery.

Hotel, motel, and resort desk Faster than average growth. As the
 clerks economy improves, travel is expected
 to increase and developers are
 expected to open more hotels. Job
 prospects for these clerks should be
 favorable.

Human resources assistants, Moderate decline. Productivity gains
 except payroll and from office automation are expected
 timekeeping to lead to declines in the employment
 of human resources assistants.
 Jobseekers may face competition.
 Opportunities should be best for
 those who have excellent
 communication and computer skills.

Interviewers, except Faster than average growth. Growth
 eligibility and loan in market research and healthcare
 industries is expected to generate
 jobs for interviewers. Prospects
 should be good.

Loan interviewers and clerks Slower than average growth. The
 prevalence of online loan
 applications is expected to limit
 employment for loan interviewers, but
 some growth should result from a rise
 in the volume of loans due to
 population increases. Opportunities
 should be best for jobseekers who
 have good customer service and math
 skills.

Meter readers, utilities Rapid decline. Automated meter
 reading systems that are operated
 remotely are expected to reduce
 employment of meter readers. But
 opportunities are expected to be good
 because of the need to replace
 workers who leave the occupation.

Office and administrative About average growth. Employment
 support worker supervisors growth is expected to be tempered by
 and managers technological advances that increase
 the productivity of--and thus
 decrease the need for--these workers
 and the workers they supervise. Keen
 competition is expected.

Order clerks Rapid decline. Improvements in
 technology continue to increase
 worker productivity and decrease the
 need for order clerks. But
 opportunities are expected to be
 favorable, especially for seasonal
 work, because of the need to replace
 existing workers who leave the
 occupation.

Payroll and timekeeping clerks Moderate decline. Projected
 employment declines will result from
 increased automation of the payroll
 and timekeeping process. But
 opportunities are expected due to the
 need to replace workers leaving the
 occupation. Jobseekers with
 certification should have the best
 prospects.

Police, fire, and ambulance Faster than average growth. The
 dispatchers growing and aging population will
 increase demand for emergency
 services, leading to employment
 increases for these dispatchers. Job
 opportunities should be favorable.

Postal Service clerks Rapid decline. Postal Service clerks
 will be adversely affected by
 continued declines in the volume of
 first-class mail. Keen competition is
 expected because this occupation has
 relatively few entry requirements and
 attractive wages and benefits.

Postal Service mail sorters, Rapid decline. Increased automation
 processors, and processing is expected to decrease employment of
 machine operators these workers. Keen competition is
 expected to continue because this
 occupation has relatively few entry
 requirements and attractive wages and
 benefits.

Procurement clerks Slower than average growth.
 Employment of procurement clerks
 should diminish as computers are
 increasingly used by suppliers to
 place direct orders and by consumers
 to place Internet orders. Job
 prospects are expected to be
 favorable.

Production, planning, and Little or no change. Job openings are
 expediting clerks expected to arise from the need to
 replace workers who leave the
 occupation. Opportunities should be
 limited in manufacturing but better
 in industries with faster growth,
 such as wholesale trade and
 warehousing.

Reservation and About average growth. Increased use
 transportation ticket of online reservations systems and
 agents and travel clerks self-service ticketing machines are
 expected to reduce the number of
 workers needed for most routine
 services, but these agents and clerks
 will still provide in-person
 requests. Competition is expected.

Stock clerks and order fillers About average growth. Steady growth
 is expected, especially in retail
 trade where workers handling
 individual items and small quantities
 make job tasks difficult to automate.
 Job prospects should be good because
 of the need to replace workers who
 leave the occupation.

Tellers Slower than average growth. Banks
 opening branches in a variety of
 locations, such as grocery stores,
 should result in some employment
 growth. Favorable job prospects are
 expected.

Weighers, measurers, checkers, Rapid decline. Increased automation
 and samplers, recordkeeping of the tasks performed by these
 workers is expected to lead to
 employment declines. Favorable
 opportunities are expected, however,
 because of the need to replace
 existing workers who leave the
 occupations.

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations

Fishers and fishing vessel 35,600 -2,700 -8
 operators

Forest and conservation 12,900 1,100 9
 workers

Logging workers 66,100 3,900 6

Agricultural workers, other 821,700 -17,400 -2

Other farming, fishing, and forestry occupations

Agricultural inspectors 16,600 2,100 13

Graders and sorters, 33,400 100 0
 agricultural products

Occupation Employment prospects

Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations

Fishers and fishing vessel Moderate decline. Seafood imports and
 operators the prevalence of farm-raised fish
 have reduced employment of these
 workers. Most job openings are
 expected to come from the need to
 replace workers who leave the
 occupation. Large fishing operations
 should provide the best prospects.

Forest and conservation About average growth. Employment of
 workers forest and conservation workers is
 projected to increase along with
 interest in protecting natural
 resources and wildlife habitats. The
 best employment opportunities should
 continue to be in the Southeast and
 the Pacific Northwest.

Logging workers Slower than average growth. Demand
 for new wood products should spur
 some employment growth. But job
 growth is likely to be modest because
 of mechanization and competition from
 other countries with well developed
 logging industries.

Agricultural workers, other Little or no change. Continued
 consolidation of farms and
 productivity gains from increased use
 of agricultural machinery are
 expected to curb the need for
 additional workers. But job openings
 should be plentiful.

Other farming, fishing, and forestry occupations

Agricultural inspectors About average growth. Federal and
 State governments, the largest
 employers of these workers, are not
 expected to hire a significant number
 of new inspectors. Job prospects
 should be good to replace the many
 agricultural inspectors expected to
 leave the occupation permanently.

Graders and sorters, Little or no change. Increases in
 agricultural products automation and in agricultural
 imports should limit employment
 growth in this occupation Most
 openings are expected to result from
 workers leaving the occupation.

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Construction trades and related workers

Boilermakers 20,200 3,800 19

Brickmasons, blockmasons, and 160,200 18,500 12
 stonemasons

Carpenters 1,284,900 165,400 13

Carpet, floor, and the 160,500 11,400 7
 installers and finishers

Cement masons, concrete 207,800 26,700 13
 finishers, segmental payers,
 and terrazzo workers

Construction and building 106,400 17,900 17
 inspectors

Construction equipment 469,300 56,200 12
 operators

Construction laborers 1,248,700 255,900 20
 (*) (*)

Drywall and ceiling the 237,700 28,500 12
 installers, tapers,
 plasterers, and stucco
 masons

Electricians 694,900 83,000 12

Elevator installers and 24,900 2,300 9
 repairers

Glaziers 54,100 4,200 8

Hazardous materials removal 42,500 6,300 15
 workers
Insulation workers 57,300 9,900 17

Painters and paperhangers 450,100 29,800 7

Plumbers, pipelayers, 555,900 86,300 16
 pipefitters, and
 steamfitters

Roofers 148,900 5,700 4

Sheet metal workers 170,700 11,100 6

Structural and reinforcing 97,800 12,200 12
 iron and metal workers

Occupation Employment prospects

Construction trades and related workers

Boilermakers Faster than average growth. Projected
 employment growth will be driven by
 the need to maintain and upgrade
 existing boilers and install
 equipment that is less harmful to the
 environment. Job prospects should be
 favorable.

Brickmasons, blockmasons, and About average growth. Employment
 stonemasons growth is expected to be driven by a
 growing population's need for many
 types of new structures. These
 workers will also be needed to
 renovate older buildings and increase
 their energy efficiency.

Carpenters About average growth. New
 construction projects are expected to
 increase employment for carpenters.
 Opportunities should be best for
 jobseekers who prepare through an
 apprenticeship or other formal
 training.

Carpet, floor, and the About average growth. Expected
 installers and finishers employment gains for these workers
 will arise from growing population
 and resulting increases in building
 and renovating structures. Job
 openings are also expected from the
 need to replace workers who leave the
 occupations permanently.

Cement masons, concrete About average growth. Expected
 finishers, segmental payers, employment growth should result from
 and terrazzo workers new construction projects and from
 the need to repair and renovate
 existing highways, bridges, and other
 structures. Entry-level opportunities
 should be good.

Construction and building Faster than average growth.
 inspectors Employment growth is expected to be
 driven by desires for safety and
 improved quality of construction.
 Prospects should be best for workers
 who have some college education,
 certification, and construction
 experience.

Construction equipment About average growth. Increased
 operators government spending on infrastructure
 is expected to generate employment
 growth for these workers. Operators
 who have varied expertise are
 expected to have the best prospects.

Construction laborers Much faster than average growth.
 Employment of these workers is
 projected to increase because of
 additional government spending on
 infrastructure repair and
 reconstruction. Opportunities will
 vary based on jobseekers' experience,
 training, and willingness to
 relocate.

Drywall and ceiling the About average growth. Projected
 installers, tapers, employment growth is likely to stem
 plasterers, and stucco from increases in new construction
 masons and remodeling. Overall job prospects
 are expected to be good, especially
 for experienced workers.

Electricians About average growth. Population
 growth is expected to spur increases
 in construction, which in turn will
 increase employment of electricians.
 The need to update the electrical
 systems of existing buildings should
 also drive employment growth.
 Opportunities should be good.

Elevator installers and About average growth. The need to
 repairers install new equipment and to
 maintain, update, and repair old
 equipment should lead to employment
 growth for these workers. Entry-level
 workers should have excellent
 opportunities.

Glaziers About average growth. Projected
 employment growth will stem from
 increasing demand for new
 construction of commercial structures
 as well as the need to modernize and
 repair existing structures. Job
 prospects should be best for glaziers
 who have a broad range of skills.

Hazardous materials removal Faster than average growth.
 workers Employment growth is expected due to
 increased calls for eco-friendly
 electric generation facilities and
 production of nuclear power. Job
 opportunities are expected to be
 good.

Insulation workers Faster than average growth. Expected
 employment increases for insulation
 workers are spurred by the need to
 make existing buildings more energy
 efficient. Anticipated construction
 of new power plants should also lead
 to employment gains. Opportunities
 are expected to be excellent,
 particularly for jobseekers with
 knowledge of weatherization.

Painters and paperhangers About average growth. Construction,
 remodeling, and maintenance of
 existing buildings and infrastructure
 will drive employment growth for
 these workers. Job prospects should
 be good because of the need to
 replace workers who leave these
 occupations permanently.

Plumbers, pipelayers, Faster than average growth.
 pipefitters, and Employment of these workers is
 steamfitters projected to increase due to new
 construction and renovation projects,
 as well as maintenance of existing
 pipe systems. Increasing emphasis on
 water conservation should require
 retrofitting to conserve water,
 leading to employment growth for
 plumbers. Workers with welding
 experience should have especially
 good opportunities.

Roofers Slower than average growth. The need
 to install and repair new and
 existing roofs should generate some
 job growth. But this growth is
 expected to be limited as a greater
 proportion of roofing tasks are
 completed by other construction
 workers.

Sheet metal workers Slower than average growth.
 Employment of sheet metal workers in
 the construction industry is expected
 to increase along with building
 activity. But employment is likely to
 decline somewhat in manufacturing,
 due to increased automation and the
 movement of some work abroad.
 Opportunities should be particularly
 good for jobseekers who have
 apprenticeship training or who are
 certified welders.

Structural and reinforcing About average growth. Opportunities
 iron and metal workers are expected to arise from the need
 to build new structures and from the
 need to maintain, repair, and replace
 existing ones. Job prospects should
 be best in the South and the West due
 to their growing populations.

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations

Electrical and electronic equipment mechanics, installers, and repairers

Computer, automated teller, 152,900 -6,700 -4
 and office machine repairers

Electrical and electronics 160,900 7,500 5
 installers and repairers

Electronic home entertainment 51,200 5,500 11
 equipment installers and
 repairers

Radio and telecommunications 208,800 -700 0
 equipment installers and
 repairers

Vehicle and mobile equipment mechanics, installers, and repairers

Aircraft and avionics 140,300 9,800 7
 equipment mechanics and
 service technicians

Automotive body and related 185,900 1,100 I
 repairers

Automotive service technicians 763,700 35,900 5
 and mechanics

Diesel service technicians and 263,100 14,900 6
 mechanics

Heavy vehicle and mobile 190,700 15,500 8
 equipment service
 technicians and mechanics

Small engine mechanics 70,400 4,800 7

Miscellaneous installation, maintenance, and repair occupations

Heating, air-conditioning, 308,200 86,600 28
 and refrigeration mechanics (*)
 and installers

Home appliance repairers 49,600 1,100 2

Industrial machinery 408,300 25,000 6
 mechanics and millwrights

Line installers and repairers 284,900 6,600 2

Maintenance and repair 1,361,300 147,900 11
 workers, general

Medical equipment repairers 41,400 11,300 27
 (*)

Other installation, maintenance, and repair occupations

Camera and photographic 4,600 -700 -15
 equipment repairers

Coin, vending, and amusement 43,800 3,100 7
 machine servicers and
 repairers

Musical instrument repairers 6,100 0 0
 and tuners

Watch repairers 3,200 -400 -14

Occupation Employment prospects

Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations

Electrical and electronic equipment mechanics, installers, and repairers

Computer, automated teller, Moderate decline. Projected
 and office machine repairers employment growth will be constrained
 by the use of laborsaving technology.
 Job prospects are expected to be
 limited. Jobseekers with
 certification, formal training,
 knowledge of electronics, and repair
 experience should have the best
 prospects.

Electrical and electronics Slower than average growth.
 installers and repairers Employment growth for these workers
 is expected to be limited as
 improvements in the quality of
 electrical and electronic equipment
 result in less need for repairs. The
 best prospects are expected for
 jobseekers who have certification,
 an associate degree, and relevant
 experience.

Electronic home entertainment About average growth. Employment of
 equipment installers and these workers should rise along with
 repairers sales of home entertainment
 equipment. But as the cost of this
 equipment falls, a preference for
 replacement over repair may limit
 employment growth. Opportunities
 should be best for jobseekers who
 have certification, knowledge of
 electronics, relevant experience, and
 customer service skills.

Radio and telecommunications Little or no change.
 equipment installers and Telecommunications companies
 repairers providing many new services, such as
 faster Internet connections and video
 on demand, are expected to result in
 employment growth for these workers.
 But better equipment will require
 less maintenance work, slowing
 employment growth. Prospects should
 be best for jobseekers with computer
 skills and training in electronics.

Vehicle and mobile equipment mechanics, installers, and repairers

Aircraft and avionics About average growth. Air traffic is
 equipment mechanics and expected to increase due to an
 service technicians expanding economy and a growing
 population, leading to employment
 growth for aircraft mechanics and
 service technicians. Prospects should
 be best for jobseekers who have
 experience and professional
 certification.

Automotive body and related Little or no change. As vehicle
 repairers components become more
 technologically advanced and
 expensive, the trend for vehicles to
 be declared a total loss following a
 collision is expected to result in
 fewer repairs and, thus, minimal
 employment growth for these workers.
 But many job openings are expected to
 occur as existing workers leave the
 occupation permanently. Jobseekers
 with formal training should have the
 best prospects.

Automotive service technicians Slower than average growth.
 and mechanics Consolidation in the automobile
 dealer industry, a significant
 employer of technicians, is expected
 to limit growth in this occupation.
 But some opportunities are expected
 because of the need to service the
 growing number of vehicles in the
 United States. Jobseekers who
 complete formal training should have
 good prospects.

Diesel service technicians and Slower than average growth. The
 mechanics increasing durability of new diesel
 engines is expected to hamper growth
 for the workers who repair them. This
 factor will be partially offset by
 the need for these workers due to
 increased freight shipments and the
 need to retrofit vehicles to meet
 environmental regulations.
 Opportunities should be very good for
 jobseekers with technical skills and
 formal training.

Heavy vehicle and mobile About average growth. Continued
 equipment service expansion of the industries that use
 technicians and mechanics heavy mobile equipment, such as
 agriculture and energy exploration
 and mining, should lead to additional
 jobs for these workers. Opportunities
 should be good for jobseekers who
 have experience or formal training.

Small engine mechanics About average growth. Employment
 growth is projected to be greatest
 for workers who repair motorcycles as
 the number of registered motorcycles
 continues to increase. Excellent job
 prospects are expected for jobseekers
 with formal training.

Miscellaneous installation, maintenance, and repair occupations

Heating, air-conditioning, Much faster than average growth.
 and refrigeration mechanics Demand for better energy management
 and installers is expected to create jobs for
 workers who replace older systems in
 existing homes and buildings with
 newer, more efficient units.
 Prospects should be excellent,
 particularly for jobseekers who have
 completed accredited training
 programs or formal apprenticeships.

Home appliance repairers Little or no change. Smaller,
 inexpensive appliances are
 increasingly replaced rather than
 repaired, resulting in minimal
 projected job growth for repairers to
 service major appliances. Excellent
 job prospects are expected, however.
 Opportunities should be best in
 metropolitan areas and for jobseekers
 who have formal training.

Industrial machinery Slower than average growth. The
 mechanics and millwrights increasing reliance on machinery in
 manufacturing is expected to lead to
 employment growth for these
 maintenance and installation workers.
 Favorable job prospects are expected.

Line installers and repairers Little or no change. Despite declines
 in some of the industries that employ
 these workers, some growth is
 expected as cities and the overall
 population expand and create a need
 for power and communications lines.
 Very good opportunities are expected
 as more workers in the electrical
 power industry near retirement age
 than workers in other industries.

Maintenance and repair About average growth. Employment is
 workers, general related to the extent of building
 stock and the amount of equipment
 needing maintenance and repair.
 Opportunities should be excellent,
 especially for jobseekers with
 experience or certification.

Medical equipment repairers Much faster than average growth. An
 increased demand for healthcare
 services and the growing complexity
 of medical equipment are projected to
 result in greater need for these
 repairers. Excellent job prospects
 are expected. Jobseekers who have an
 associate degree should have the best
 prospects.

Other installation, maintenance, and repair occupations

Camera and photographic Rapid decline. Because of
 equipment repairers technological improvements, most
 consumers opt to replace a broken
 camera with a newer model rather than
 have the broken one repaired.
 Competition for jobs is expected as
 employment declines limit
 opportunities.

Coin, vending, and amusement About average growth. Although the
 machine servicers and number of vending and slot machines
 repairers is expected to rise, these machines
 are becoming easier to maintain and
 repair. There will be fewer video
 arcade machines as people play more
 of these games at home. Job
 opportunities should be excellent for
 repairers with training in
 electronics who are willing to travel
 and to work irregular hours.

Musical instrument repairers Little or no change. Band and
 and tuners orchestra programs in high
 schools--the primary source of
 business for repairers--are not as
 prevalent as they once were. But job
 opportunities should arise from the
 need to replace workers who are
 leaving the occupation permanently.

Watch repairers Rapid decline. The high cost of
 repairs will compel many consumers to
 replace their watches rather than
 have them fixed. But good prospects
 are expected from the need to replace
 workers leaving the occupation.

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Production occupations

Assemblers and fabricators

 1,950,900 -37,800 -2

Food processing occupations

 706,700 27,400 4

Metal workers and plastic workers

Computer control programmers 157,800 6,700 4
 and operators

Machine setters, operators, 1,028,400 -129,400 -13
 and tenders--metal and
 plastic

Machinists 421,500 -19,300 -5

Tool and die makers 84,300 -6,700 -8

Welding, soldering, and 466,400 -10,500 -2
 brazing workers

Printing occupations

Bookbinders and bindery 66,500 -12,900 -19
 workers

Prepress technicians and 106,900 -14,300 -13
 workers

Printing machine operators 195,600 -10,700 -5

Textile, apparel, and furnishings occupations

 787,500 -119,900 -15

Woodworkers

 323,300 20,600 6

Plant and system operators

Power plant operators, 50,400 200 0
 distributors, and
 dispatchers

Stationary engineers and 41,600 2,200 5
 boiler operators

Water and liquid waste 113,400 22,500 20
 treatment plant and system (*)
 operators

Miscellaneous production occupations

Inspectors, testers, sorters, 464,700 -16,900 -4
 samplers, and weighers

Jewelers and precious stone 52,100 2,800 5
 and metal workers

Medical, dental, and 95,200 13,100 14
 ophthalmic laboratory
 technicians

Painting and coating workers, 192,700 7,300 4
 except construction and
 maintenance

Semiconductor processors 31,600 -10,000 -32

Other production occupations

Photographic process workers 73,000 -11,800 -16
 and processing machine
 operators

Occupation Employment prospects

Production occupations

Assemblers and fabricators

 Little or no change. Increased
 production and efficiency in
 manufacturing, where most of these
 workers are employed, should
 stabilize employment. Good job
 prospects are expected.

Food processing occupations

 Slower than average growth. Increased
 demand for processed food is expected
 to increase the need for these
 workers, but efficient processing and
 distribution practices will offset
 growing output. Opportunities should
 be good because of the need to
 replace workers who leave these
 occupations.

Metal workers and plastic workers

Computer control programmers Slower than average growth.
 and operators Employment growth is expected to be
 driven by the increased use of
 computer controlled machinery. lob
 competition will exist; jobseekers
 who can operate many types of
 machines should have the best
 opportunities.

Machine setters, operators, Rapid decline. The use of more
 and tenders--metal and efficient production equipment should
 plastic cause declines. Most openings are
 expected to arise from the need to
 replace existing workers who leave
 the occupation permanently.

Machinists Moderate decline. Employment growth
 should be affected by increased
 productivity requiring fewer
 machinists. But technology is not
 expected to affect their employment
 as significantly as that of other
 production workers. Opportunities
 should be good because of the many
 openings expected to arise from the
 need to replace workers who leave the
 occupation permanently.

Tool and die makers Moderate decline. More advanced
 machinery will improve the
 productivity of these workers.
 However, the need to replace the many
 workers who are expected to leave the
 occupation should create excellent
 opportunities.

Welding, soldering, and Little or no change. An expected
 brazing workers decline in the demand for welders due
 to automation should be offset
 somewhat by the need to visually
 inspect welds and operate welding
 machinery. Few people are training to
 enter this field, so good job
 prospects are expected.

Printing occupations

Bookbinders and bindery Rapid decline. Employment is expected
 workers to slow as print productivity
 increases and as distribution of
 advertising supplements shifts from
 print to electronic media.
 Experienced workers should continue
 to have the best opportunities for
 skilled jobs.

Prepress technicians and Rapid decline. Improvements in
 workers printing technology and the growing
 use of publishing software are
 expected to increase productivity and
 reduce the need for these workers.
 Opportunities should be favorable for
 workers with strong computer and
 customer service skills.

Printing machine operators Moderate decline. Increasing printer
 speed and automation are expected to
 lower employment for press operators.
 The need to replace those who leave
 the occupation should create
 favorable opportunities for workers
 trained in using computerized
 equipment.

Textile, apparel, and furnishings occupations

 Rapid decline. Continued job loss is
 expected due to increasing imports,
 the growing use of assembly abroad,
 and automation. But some openings
 should arise from the need to replace
 workers who leave the occupation.

Woodworkers

 Slower than average growth.
 Automation has reduced the number of
 people required to produce a finished
 product, but improved efficiency has
 also made domestic wood products more
 competitive with imports. Job
 prospects should be excellent for
 highly qualified workers.

Plant and system operators

Power plant operators, Little or no change. Although annual
 distributors, and energy use continues to grow in the
 dispatchers United States, greater power plant
 efficiency is expected to temper
 employment gains resulting from that
 growth. Job opportunities should be
 excellent, however, because of the
 need to replace a large number of
 retiring workers.

Stationary engineers and Slower than average growth.
 boiler operators Commercial and industrial development
 is expected to increase the amount
 of equipment to be operated and
 maintained. Jobseekers face
 competition; those who have completed
 an apprenticeship or other formal
 training should have the best
 prospects.

Water and liquid waste Much faster than average growth.
 treatment plant and system Growth in the population, especially
 operators in suburban areas, is expected to
 boost demand for water and
 wastewater-treatment services. Job
 opportunities should be excellent.

Miscellaneous production occupations

Inspectors, testers, sorters, Moderate decline. Automated
 samplers, and weighers inspection equipment and a
 redistribution of some quality
 control duties from inspectors to
 production workers are expected to
 contribute to employment declines in
 these occupations. Job opportunities
 should be better for workers who have
 experience.

Jewelers and precious stone Slower than average growth. Continued
 and metal workers increases in jewelry imports, as well
 as consolidation and growth in online
 jewelers, are expected to constrain
 employment growth of this occupation.
 Employment opportunities should be
 favorable for skilled jewelers.

Medical, dental, and Faster than average growth. The
 ophthalmic laboratory ongoing preva-lence of chronic
 technicians diseases--which often necessitate the
 use of medical devices--is expected
 to increase employment of medical
 appliance technicians. And an aging
 population and increased demand for
 cosmetic dental procedures should
 create more jobs for dental and
 ophthalmic laboratory technicians.
 Favorable job prospects are expected.

Painting and coating workers, Slower than average growth. Projected
 except construction and employment growth will be driven by
 maintenance the increased number of goods that
 need painting and coating. Good job
 prospects are expected, due to the
 need to replace workers who leave the
 occupation.

Semiconductor processors Rapid decline. Despite strong demand
 for micro-processors, automation is
 expected to result in continued
 employment declines in this
 occupation. Competition for jobs is
 expected.

Other production occupations

Photographic process workers Rapid decline. Projected employment
 and processing machine declines for these workers are tied
 operators to the proliferation of self-service
 machines, home printers, and online
 ordering that meet most of the demand
 for digital prints. Also, photo
 editing software makes it easier for
 consumers to edit their own
 photographs.

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Transportation and material moving occupations

Air transportation occupations

Air traffic controllers 26,200 3,400 13

Aircraft pilots and flight 116,000 13,700 12
 engineers

Motor vehicle operators

Bus drivers 647,500 43,900 7

Taxi drivers and chauffeurs 232,300 36,100 16

Truck drivers and driver/sales 3,189,300 291,900 9
 workers (*)

Rail transportation occuations

 130,500 12,000 9

Water transportation occupations

 81,100 12,000 15

Material moving occupations

 4,583,700 -46,500 -1

Occupation Employment prospects

Transportation and material moving occupations

Air transportation occupations

Air traffic controllers About average growth. More
 controllers are expected to be needed
 to handle increasing air traffic.
 Competition for admission to the FAA
 Academy--the usual first step in
 employment as an air traffic
 controller--is expected to remain
 keen.

Aircraft pilots and flight About average growth. Population
 engineers growth and economic expansion are
 expected to boost demand for air
 travel. Regional airlines and
 low-cost carriers should have the
 best opportunities; pilots vying for
 jobs with major airlines face strong
 competition.

Motor vehicle operators

Bus drivers About average growth. Population
 growth is expected to create jobs for
 school bus drivers, and the increased
 popularity of public transportation
 as an alternative to driving should
 create employment growth for transit
 and intercity bus drivers. Good job
 prospects are expected.

Taxi drivers and chauffeurs Faster than average growth. Growth
 in tourism and business travel is
 expected to lead to employment
 increases for these workers. Job
 opportunities are expected to be
 plentiful.

Truck drivers and driver/sales About average growth. Employment
 workers growth for these workers is expected
 to correspond to overall economic
 growth. Job opportunities should be
 favorable, especially for long-haul
 drivers.

Rail transportation occuations

 About average growth. Freight
 transportation and the occupations
 associated with it are expected to
 expand as global trade increases and
 as more goods are shipped by rail.
 Opportunities should be good for
 qualified jobseekers because many
 workers, particularly at freight
 railroads, are expected to retire.

Water transportation occupations

 Faster than average growth. lob

 growth is expected to stem from
 increasing tourism and from growth in
 offshore oil and gas production.
 Employment is also projected to
 increase in and around major port
 cities due to growing international
 trade. Opportunities should be
 excellent as the need to replace
 workers, particularly officers,
 generates many job openings.

Material moving occupations

 Little or no change. Improvements in
 technology are expected to increase
 productivity, holding employment
 stable. Good job prospects are
 expected from the need to replace the
 many workers leaving these
 occupations.

 Employment change,
 projected
 2008-18 (1)
 Employment,
Occupation 2008 Numeric Percent

Opportunities in the U.S. Armed Forces

 1,375,100 (2) (3) (3)

Occupation Employment prospects

Opportunities in the U.S. Armed Forces

 Opportunities should be excellent in
 all branches of the military for
 applicants who meet designated
 standards.

(1) Numeric and percent changes are rounded, but they are calculated
from unrounded figures for current and projected employment.

(2) Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Manpower Data Center.
Data are for May 31, 2008, and exclude U.S. Coast Guard. For U.S.
military personnel statistics, see http://siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil/
personnel/MILITARY/miltop.htm.

(3) A projection is not available from the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
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Publication:Occupational Outlook Quarterly
Article Type:Statistical data
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Mar 22, 2010
Words:17881
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