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Terrariums.

Terrariums are little gardens. The plants grow in covered containers. It's fun to make your own! The container can be glass or plastic and needs a lid. Put rocks or gravel on the bottom, then add soil. Now it's time to plant!

Plant different kinds of small plants. Leave enough space around each one for it to grow. Mist with water until the soil is damp, but not too wet. Then put on the lid.

Inside your terrarium, the plants have everything they need to live, such as air, water, and light. The glass traps the water that the plants need. When the drops of water get big and heavy enough, they drip down onto the plants. Now, it's raining in your terrarium! This is just like what happens on Earth. Drops of water form clouds, and then it rains. This is called the rain cycle.

On Earth, we have about the same amount of water as we had millions of years ago! Water is constantly being recycled. Terrariums work the same way. This is why you don't need to add water very often.

Level C:

DID YOU KNOW??

One tropical vine grows so fast that it starts to attach to a support 20 seconds after touching it.

(Cyclanthera pedata)

DID YOU KNOW??

Plants help make animal life on Earth possible, because they take carbon dioxide out of air and make oxygen.

DID YOU KNOW??

The word terrarium comes from the Latin Word terra, meaning earth.

Vocabulary

Oops! WHY-FLY spilled some letters. Help him finish this word puzzle.

DID YOU KNOW??

The first terrariums, called Wardian cases, protected ferns from the fumes of gas lamps.

DID YOU KNOW??

One terrarium lasted 18 years without having water added.

DID YOU KNOW??

Ferns have been on Earth about 300 million years.
 Key

 r s b e a
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5]


T[4][1][1][5][1]ium[2] h[4]lp[4]d t[1][5]d[4][1][2] [5]nd [4]xplo[1][4][1][2] [3][1]ing pl[5]nt[2] [3][5]ck [2][5]f[4]ly on [2]hip[2].

Weekly Lab

Let's make a terrarium!

You need: a large plastic or glass jar with a lid, rocks, soil, a spray bottle, a variety of small plants

Step 1: Put rocks on the bottom.

Step 2: Add soil.

Step 3: Put in your plants.

Step 4: Use a spray bottle to add some water.

Step 5: Put on the lid.

Keep this in a bright place, but not in direct sunlight.

DID YOU KNOW??

People lose water when they perspire and plants lose water when they transpire.

Weekly Problem

Here is what WHY-FLY needs for his terrarium.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

How much will he spend?

DID YOU KNOW??

Ferns became scarce in England during the 1800's because people used so many for their terrariums.

DID YOU KNOW??

A small raindrop can take more than one hour to reach Earth.

DID YOU KNOW??

In England during the 1800's, some wealthy people had fancy terrariums shaped like the Taj Mahal palace.

Writing for Science

It is best to use small plants in your terrarium. Your neighbors accidentally planted lots of kudzu and forgot to tighten the lid.

What happened?

Use your imagination!

Challenge

Some plants have funny or odd names. The names are a clue to what the plants look like. Invent a plant with a funny name and draw a picture of it.

DID YOU KNOW??

A tropical plant called "Coughing Bean vine" coughs and trembles when around dust.

Bonus: Tape a plastic bag over a potted plant. What do you see the next day?

DID YOU KNOW??

A rain forest or woodland terrarium does best in a north or east window.

Puzzle

Use the clues to solve the crossword puzzle.

ACROSS

4) Garden in a closed container

5) Downpours

7) Bottom layer of a terrarium

DOWN

1) Liquid in terrariums

2) Terrariums are made in plastic or--jars.

3) Rain comes from these.

6) What we breathe

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Terrariums

Background

History of Terrariums

Terrariums were popular in the United States during the 1960's and 70's. Now that bellbottoms and macrame are stylish once again, is it any wonder that terrariums are back in vogue too? Today, thanks to the efforts of plant breeders, terrarium owners can find a much greater variety of miniature plants than ever before.

Like many other useful things, terrariums were invented by accident. In 1829, Dr. Nathaniel Ward was studying the life cycle of the sphinx moth when he noticed tiny ferns growing in a sealed bottle, which hadn't been watered in 4 years! Dr. Ward lived in London, where the heavily polluted air had foiled his efforts to grow ferns in his garden. The fumes given off by gas lamps were especially poisonous to plants. The terrarium, or Wardian case, as the prototype was called, protected the plants from pollution and provided the humid air that ferns need. Soon, growing ferns indoors was all the rage in London, later spreading throughout England and to the United States. In fact, Londoners dug so many ferns for their terrariums, that it was hard to find the plants growing outdoors in the city! Victorian-era terrariums were often large, leaded glass containers mounted on ornate wrought-iron stands. Some were even modeled after the Taj Mahal or Brighton Pavilion.

Terrariums proved to be practical and not just pleasant decorations. Many attempts by explorers and traders to bring plants back home by ship from foreign lands had failed. However, the Wardian cases solved that problem, protecting the young plants from salt spray and drying winds. The cases also kept the plants moist. Thanks to Dr. Ward's terrarium, over 20,000 tea plants were successfully transported by ship from China to India, and India's tea industry was begun.

Life in a Terrarium

A terrarium provides everything plants need to live. Minerals come from the soil, and perhaps from an occasional dose of weak fertilizer (too much fertilizer causes the plants to grow too fast). Sunlight comes in through the clear glass or plastic. Unlike houseplants growing in pots, terrariums should never be placed in direct sunlight, because the temperatures in the sealed container will get too high, "cooking" the plants and encouraging the growth of algae on the walls.

The sealed case of a terrarium traps water, making this type of gardening good for those of us who forget to water our plants. In fact, one Wardian case lasted 18 years without having any water added! Air is also trapped inside. At night, plants use oxygen from the air to produce carbon dioxide. During the day, the plants use the carbon dioxide, plus sunlight and chlorophyll, to make food and oxygen (photosynthesis). Sometimes people have more than plants growing in their terrariums. When animals such as lizards, snakes, and spiders are added, these closed environments are called vivariums.

The Weather Cycle

The weather cycle in a terrarium is much like Earth's rain cycle, just on a smaller scale. The cycles consists of transpiration, evaporation, condensation, and precipitation.

Transpiration is the moving of water up from the roots of a plant and out through the leaves. As the water moves up through the plant, it carries minerals with it. Once water reaches the leaves, it escapes through tiny holes called stomata. Only 10% of the water taken up by the roots is used for photosynthesis and growth. The other 90% is lost through transpiration.

Various factors can affect the rate of transpiration. High temperatures increase transpiration, while high humidity decreases it. In the outdoors, wind is a factor, because as wind sweeps water away from the surface of leaves, other water molecules take their place. In most plants, roots continue to take up water at night but transpiration stops. This lets the plants replenish water they lost during the day. When plants are under water stress, such as during a drought, the stomata begin to close as a defense against wilting.

Transpiration helps to cool plants down, much as perspiring helps to cool people. When water escapes from the plants' leaves, it is heated by the sun and turned into vapor, a process known as evaporation. In the terrarium, water evaporates from leaves and also from the soil. On Earth, water evaporates from plants, trees, and bodies of water such as lakes, rivers, and oceans.

It is evaporation that lowers the temperature of plants, and people. A leaf in full sun at mid-day may have a temperature of 1 to 5 degrees Celsius warmer than the surrounding air. As the plant begins to transpire and evaporation begins, the temperature of the leaf drops.

Condensation occurs when water vapor cools and forms drops. In the terrarium, this condensation will be visible on the sides or top of the container. The drops crowd together and grow heavier. When they become heavier than the air, it "rains" in the terrarium.

The weather in a given environment depends partly on how many trees exist there. In a rain forest, the tree canopy traps water vapor, creating very humid conditions. In a desert, the lack of trees contributes to the dryness of the air and lack of rainfall.

Biosphere II

In the late 1980's, a 3-acre, terrarium-like dome of steel and glass was built in the Arizona desert. The object was to find out if 8 people could live in a sealed environment for 2 years. If successful, the huge project, financed by multimillionaire Edward Bass, was to be a prototype for future colonies in space or on a polluted Earth.

Biosphere II was to be self-sustaining, with the air and water being recycled. The 8 people were to grow their own crops and recycle their wastes. The first year of the mission, which started in 1991, was a success, but the second year was plagued by massive crop failures. In addition, some of the 8 colonists became sick from low oxygen and high carbon dioxide levels, requiring oxygen to be pumped in from the outside and air filters to be installed.

A shorter mission was begun in 1994, but the dome wasn't completely sealed and scientists were given a greater role. Today, Biosphere II operates as a research lab and education center run by Columbia University for the 100 college students who come there to study each year. Even though the original goal of Biosphere II wasn't achieved, much has been learned by this ambitious experiment.

Planning and constructing simple terrariums, or more complex versions, is a wonderful experience for all of your students and a science project they can keep at home for a long time to come.

Level Pre-A

Main Concepts: Plants can grow together in terrariums. They are miniature gardens in sealed containers.

Picture Activity

Ask your students if they have plants growing in pots in their homes. Then ask if the terrarium pictured on the front page is different from a plant in a pot. The answer is yes, because the terrarium has more than one plant and the container is sealed. Ask what they see in the picture that shows what plants need to grow. Plants need soil and water. Why do they think WHY-FLY is wearing a raincoat. Explain that the lid traps water inside the terrarium for the plants to use.

Vocabulary

Answer: Terrarium. Ask them to point to the letters that are already filled in. Ask what letter it is and how many times it is used in this word. Tell them they can find this word throughout their Science Weekly. Have them use the letters given on the plant's leaves to help them finish spelling out this word.

Weekly Lab

You need: large plastic or glass containers with lids, rocks (or gravel), potting soil, a variety of small plants, spray bottles. You can make individual terrariums and/or one large class terrarium in an aquarium. Have your students put a 1- to 2-inch layer of gravel or small rocks on the bottom of their containers. Then have them put a 3-inch layer of soil on top of that. Now they are ready to start planting. Remind them to leave space between their plants so that they will have room to grow. Have them use their hands to make small holes in the soil, then have them gently put their plants into the holes. They should pat the soil around the plants to hold them in place. Then have them mist their plants until the soil is damp, but not soggy. Finally, have them tightly put the lids on their containers.

Weekly Problem

Have your students color in the crayons first to use as their color key. Then have them color in the parts of the terrarium using the numbers as guides. The rocks are gray, the soil is brown, the plants are green, the flower is yellow, and the lid is red.

Storytelling

Tell your students to look at all 3 pictures. Ask them why the potted plant in the first picture is wilted. What happens after WHY-FLY waters this plant? Ask them if they have ever watered house plants at home. How could they tell that the plants needed water? Ask them why WHY-FLY didn't add water to the terrarium. (The lid on the terrarium keeps the water from escaping.) How did the plant in the terrarium look in all 3 pictures?

Challenge

Answers: a and d are alike, b and c are alike. Tell them to look very carefully at all the terrariums.

Home Base

This activity can be done at home or in class. Have your students water their plant so that the soil is damp, but not soggy. Then have them carefully place the bag over their plant. They should tape the bag to the pot so that it is completely sealed. Have them put the plant in bright sunlight and then check the bag the next day. Ask them what they see. Water vapor will have condensed in the bag. Explain that a plant's roots take water from soil. Plants lose water through their leaves, but we can not see this happening. However, we can see the water that came from the plant's leaves, when it collects on the bag.

Level A

Main Concepts: Plants can grow together in a terrarium. The container needs to have a lid. Terrariums are miniature gardens in sealed containers that trap water and air for plants.

Picture Activity

Ask your students if they have plants growing in pots in their homes. Then ask if the terrarium pictured on the front page is different from a plant in a pot. The answer is yes, because the terrarium has more than 1 plant and the container is sealed. Ask what they see in the picture that shows what plants need to grow. Plants need soil and water. Why do they think WHY-FLY is wearing a raincoat. Explain that the lid traps water and air inside the terrarium for the plants to use.

Vocabulary

Answer: Terrarium. Tell your students they can find the vocabulary word on the front page and throughout their Science Weekly. Have them count the r's in terrarium.

Weekly Lab

You need: large plastic or glass containers with lids, rocks (or gravel), petting soil, a variety of small plants, spray bottles. You can make Individual terrariums and/or one large class terrarium in an aquarium. Have your students put a 1- to 2-inch layer of gravel or small rocks on the bottom of their containers. Then have them put a 3-inch layer of soil on top of that. Now they are ready to start planting. Remind them to leave space between their plants so that they will have room to grow. Have them use their hands to make small holes in the soil, then have them gently put their plants into the holes. They should pat the soil around the plants to hold them in place. Then have them mist their plants until the soil is damp, but not soggy. Finally, have them tightly put the lids on their containers.

Weekly Problem

Answers: red = 2, yellow = 3, green = 4, brown = 5, gray = 6. Have your students solve the problems first and color in the crayons to use as their color key. Then have them color in the parts of the terrarium using the numbers as guides.

Writing for Science

Tell your students to look at all 3 pictures. Ask them why the potted plant in the first picture is wilted. What happens after WHY-FLY waters this plant? Ask them if they have ever watered house plants at home. How could they tell that the plants needed water? Ask them why WHY-FLY didn't add water to the terrarium. (The lid on the terrarium keeps the water from escaping.) How did the plant in the terrarium look in all 3 pictures?

Challenge

Answers: a, c, and d are alike, b is different.

Home Base

This activity can be done at home or in class. Have your students water their plants so that the soil is damp, but not soggy. Then have them carefully place the bag over their plant. They should tape the bag to the pot so that it is completely sealed. Have them put the plant in bright sunlight. Then have them check the bag next day. Ask them what they see. Water vapor will have condensed in the bag. Explain that a plant's roots take water from soil. Plants lose water through their leaves, but we can not see this happening. However, we can see the water that came from the plant's leaves, when it collects on the bag.

Level B

Main Concepts: Terrariums are gardens growing in containers. They contain everything plants need to live. Water and air are trapped inside the terrarium.

Vocabulary

Answers: 1) terrariums 2) closed 3) soil 4) plants.

Moss.

Weekly Lab

Your students should put a 1- to 2-inch layer of gravel or small rocks on the bottom of their containers. Then have them put a 3-inch layer of soil on top of that. Remind them to leave space between the plants so that they will have room to grow. Have them use their hands to make small holes in the soil. Then have them gently put their plants into the holes. They should pat the soil around the plants to hold them in place.

Weekly Problem

Answer: $7.25.

Writing for Science

Explain that kudzu is a fast-growing vine that was brought over from Japan. It was planted in this country as a way to keep soil from washing away during storms. The problem is that kudzu grows so well, it takes over everything around it! Once it is planted, it can be almost impossible to get rid of. Kudzu can take over trees, buildings, and hillsides. Many people have tried to come up with creative ways to use kudzu. Ask your students to imagine what would happen if their neighbors planted lots of kudzu. How could they combat it? Is there any way they could put the kudzu to good use?

Challenge

Have your students water their plants so that the soil is damp, but not soggy. Then have them carefully place the bag over their plant. They should tape the bag to the pot so that it is completely sealed. Have them put the plant in bright sunlight. The next day, have them check the bag. Ask them what they see. Water vapor will have condensed on the bag. Explain that a plant's roots take water from the soil. Plants lose water through their leaves. The water that came out of their plant's leaves is what they see on the bag.

Home Base

Explain that plants come in many different colors, sizes, textures, and shapes. Some plants are named for the way they look, feel, or smell. Encourage your students to use their imaginations to invent a plant with a funny or unusual name and to draw a picture illustrating it.

Level C

Main Concepts: Terrariums are gardens growing in containers. They contain everything plants need to live. Water is recycled in a terrarium, just like it is in Earth's rain cycle.

Vocabulary

Answer: Terrariums helped traders and explorers bring plants back safely on ships. Explain that high winds, salty spray, and cold usually killed plants that explorers tried to bring home from faraway lands. Wardian cases, as early terrariums were called, helped protect plants so they could be brought back.

Weekly Lab

Have your students put a 1- to 2-inch layer of gravel or small rocks on the bottom of their containers. Then have them put a 3-inch layer of soil on top of that. Remind them to leave space between the plants so that they will have room to grow. Have them use their hands to make small holes in the soil. Then have them gently put their plants into the holes. They should pat the soil around the plants to hold them in place. Explain that their terrariums should be placed in a bright spot, but their plants will "cook" if their terrariums are placed in direct sunlight.

Weekly Problem

Answer: $8.65.

Writing for Science

Explain that kudzu is a fast-growing vine that was brought over from Japan. It was planted in this country as a way to keep soil from washing away during storms. The problem is that kudzu grows so well, it takes over everything around it! Once it is planted, it can be almost impossible to get rid of. Kudzu can take over trees, buildings, and hillsides. Many people have tried to come up with creative ways to use kudzu. Ask your students to imagine what would happen if their neighbors planted lots of kudzu. How could they combat it? Is there any way they could put the kudzu to good use?

Challenge

Explain that plants come in many different colors, sizes, textures, and shapes. Some plants are named for the way they look, feel, or smell. Encourage your students to use their imaginations to invent a plant with a funny or unusual name and to draw a picture illustrating it. For the Bonus activity, have them tape the plastic bag completely around the plant and put it in bright sunlight. They will see water vapor on the bag the next day. Explain that plants lose water through tiny holes in their leaves.

Puzzle

Answers: ACROSS--4) terrarium 5) rains 7) rocks DOWN--1) water 2) glass 3) clouds 6) air.

DID YOU KNOW??

The word terrarium comes from the Latin word terra, meaning earth.

DID YOU KNOW??

A rain forest or woodland terrarium does best in a north or east window.

Level D

Main Concepts: Terrariums are gardens growing in sealed containers. They can be rain forest, woodland, or desert environments. Water is recycled in a terrarium, just like it is on Earth.

Vocabulary

Answers: 4 = i. People lose water when they perspire and plants lose water when they transpire.

Weekly Lab

Have your students put a 1- to 2-inch layer of gravel or small rocks on the bottom of their containers. Then have them put a 3-inch layer of soil on top of that. Remind them to leave space between the plants so that they will have room to grow. Have them use their hands to make small holes in the soil, then have them gently put their plants into the holes. They should pat the soil around the plants to hold them in place. Explain that the plants will "cook" if the terrarium is placed in direct sunlight. Have them check their terrariums about once a week.

Weekly Problem

Answer: 35 cents each.

Writing for Science

Explain that kudzu is a fast-growing vine that was brought over from Japan. It was planted in this country as a way to keep soil from washing away during storms. The problem is that kudzu grows so well, it takes over everything around it! Once it is planted, it can be almost impossible to get rid of. Kudzu can take over trees, buildings, and hillsides. Many people have tried to come up with creative ways to use kudzu. Encourage your students to use their imaginations in writing their scripts. What will the setting be? Will there be a hero? How will it end?

Challenge

Explain that plants come in many different colors, sizes, textures, and shapes. Some plants are named for the way they look, feel, or smell. Encourage your students to use their imaginations to invent a plant with a funny or unusual name and to draw a picture of it. For the Bonus activity, have them tape the plastic bag completely around the plant and put it in bright sunlight. They will see water vapor on the bag the next day. Explain that plants lose water through tiny holes in their leaves.

Puzzle

Answers: ACROSS--5) terrarium 6) rains 8) rocks DOWN--1) vapor 2) water 3) glass 4) soil 7) air.

DID YOU KNOW??

A small raindrop can take more than one hour to reach Earth.

Level E

Main Concepts: Terrariums are gardens growing in sealed containers. Water is recycled in a terrarium, just like Earth's rain cycle. Plants release moisture through tiny holes in their leaves, called stomata. In the Biosphere II project, people tried to live in a giant closed dome, like a terrarium.

Vocabulary

Answers: a = 2, i = 4. People lose water when they perspire and plants lose water when they transpire.

Weekly Lab

Explain that the layer of gravel or rocks provides drainage for the plants so that the roots do not rot. The charcoal keeps the soil "sweet" and fresh smelling. Mixing the soil with vermiculite will ensure a lighter soil so the roots will be able to spread out easily. Remind your students to leave space between the plants so that they will have room to grow. Have them use their hands to make small holes in the soil, then have them gently put their plants into the holes. They should pat the soil around the plants to hold them in place. Explain that the plants will "cook" if the terrarium is placed in direct sunlight. They should check the moisture level of their terrariums once a week.

Weekly Problem

Answers: The plants cost 35 cents each. The total, after tax, is $9.03. Make sure that your students calculate the cost of the plants before they add on the sales tax.

Writing for Science

Explain that kudzu is a fast-growing vine that was brought over from Japan. It was planted in this country as a way to keep soil from washing away during storms. The problem is that kudzu grows so well, it takes over everything around it! Once it is planted, it can be almost impossible to get rid of. Kudzu can take over trees, buildings, and hillsides. Many people have tried to come up with creative ways to use kudzu. Encourage your students to use their imaginations in writing their scripts. What will the setting be? Will there be a hero? How will it end?

Challenge

Explain that plants lose a great deal (about 90%) of the water taken up through their roots through tiny holes in their leaves called stomata. Try to use 2 plants of a similar size, but one should have thin, grassy leaves (e.g. a Spider plant). The other should have broad leaves (e.g. a Geranium). Have your students check the moisture on the bags the next day. Regardless of the thickness of the leaf, the plant with the most total leaf surface will give off the most vapor.

Puzzle

Answers: ACROSS--4) pores 7) terrarium 8) rocks. DOWN--1) vapor 2) air 3) water 5) soil 6) stomata. Have your students look throughout their Science Weekly to help them.

Level F

Main Concepts: Terrariums are gardens in sealed containers. Early terrariums were used by traders and explorers to transport plants safely on ships. Water is recycled in a terrarium, just like Earth's rain cycle. In the Biosphere II project, people tried to live in a giant sealed dome, based on the concept of terrariums. This idea could be used to help build future colonies in places like outer space or underwater.

Weekly Lab

Lab A: Explain that the layer of gravel or rocks provides drainage for the plants so that the roots do not rot. The charcoal keeps the soil "sweet" and fresh smelling. Mixing the soil with vermiculite will ensure a lighter soil so the roots will be able to spread out easily. Remind your students to leave space between the plants so that they will have room to grow. Have them use their hands to make small holes in the soil, then have them gently put their plants into the holes. They should pat the soil around the plants to hold them in place. Explain that the plants will "cook" if the terrarium is placed in direct sunlight. They should check the moisture level of their terrariums once a week. Lab B: Explain that plants lose a great deal (about 90%) of the water taken up through their roots through tiny holes in their leaves called stomata. Try to use 2 plants of a similar size, but one should have thin, grassy leaves (e.g. a Spider plant). The other should have broad leaves (e.g. a Geranium). Have them check the moisture on the bags the next day. Regardless of the thickness of the leaf, the plant with the most total leaf surface will give off the most vapor.

Weekly Problem

Answer: $15.12. Remind your students that they must first take off the 20% sale discount on the entire purchase, before they add on the 5% sales tax.

Writing for Science

Encourage your students to do additional research on Biosphere II for details about the daily lives of the inhabitants. Also have them use their imaginations and think of what life would be like inside a sealed dome where nothing can leave or enter. What new responsibilities would this entail? What kinds of new experiences might they have with an entire miniature world right within walking distance?

Challenge

Answers: t: 1, a: 4, s: 9, i = 16, o = 25, e = 36, w = 49, n = 64, h = 81. People lose water when they perspire and plants lose water when they transpire.

Puzzle

Answers:

ACROSS--4) pores

7) terrarium

8) rocks

10) colonies

DOWN--1) vapor

2) air

3) water

5) soil

6) stomata

9) sun

National Science Education Standards

Unifying Concepts and Processes

(K-8)

* Systems, order, and organization

* Evidence, models, and explanation

* Constancy, change, and measurement

* Evolution and equilibrium

* Form and function

Standard A: Science as Inquiry

(K-8)

* Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry

* Understanding about scientific inquiry

Standard C: Life Science

(K-4)

* The characteristics of organisms

* Life cycles of organisms

* Organisms and environments

(5-8)

* Structure and function in living systems

* Regulation and behavior

* Populations and ecosystems

* Diversity and adaptations of organisms

Standard D: Earth and Space Science

(K-4)

* Properties of earth materials

* Changes in earth and sky

(5-8)

* Structure of the earth system

Standard E: Science and Technology

(K-4)

* Abilities of technological design

* Understanding about science and technology

(5-8)

* Abilities of technological design

* Understandings about science and technology

Standard G: History and Nature of Science

(K-8)

* Science as a human endeavor

(5-8)

* Nature of science

* History of science

Helpful Sources for Planning Your Science Weekly Classroom Activities

Recommended Resources

* Bartlett, Richard D. and Fredric Frye. Terrarium and Cage Construction and Care. Hauppauge, NY: Barrons Educational Series, Inc., 1999

* Bruekel, Ray. Aquariums and Terrariums. Chicago: Children's Press, 1982

* Hoke, John. Terrariums. New York: Franklin Watts Publishing, 1972

* Hooper, Meredith. The Drop in My Drink: The Story of Water on Our Planet. New York: Viking Penguin Group, 1998

* Jes, Harold. The Terrarium: Setting Up and Maintaining a Terrarium Made Easy. Hauppauge, NY: Barrons Educational Series, Inc., 1998

* Tang, Morris. Growing Things. New York: Franklin Watts Publishing, 1994

* Weingartz, Jill. Terrariums. Mankato, MN: Smart Apple Media, 2001

Internet Resources

An animated movie and quiz about the Water Cycle--from BrainPop http://www.brainpop.com/science/ecology/watercycle/index.weml

List of good plants for Terrariums--http://www.canadiangardening.com/HTML/kids17.shtml

Lots of Links for Making Terrariums--http://www.zeal.com/category/preview.jhtml?cid=925995

Biosphere II--http://www.bio2.edu/site.htm

Series of Terrarium Gardening Articles--http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/enabling_garden/2495

Materials Needed for Issue 8-Constellations

Pre-A--paintbrushes and glow-in-the-dark paint (or glow-in-the-dark star stickers)

A--paintbrushes and glow-in-the-dark paint (or glow-in-the-dark star stickers), toilet paper tubes

B--index cards and envelopes, lamps or flashlights, hole punch

C--index cards and envelopes, lamps or flashlights, hole punches, pieces of thick cardboard, paintbrushes and glow-in-the-dark paint (or glow-in-the-dark star stickers)

D--push pins, index cards, pieces of thick cardboard, toilet paper tubes

E--push pins, index cards, pieces of thick cardboard, toilet paper tubes, glue, flashlights

F--paper fasteners, hole punches, posterboard or thick cardboard, straws, glue, push pins, index cards, toilet paper tubes, flashlights
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No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2002 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Science Weekly
Date:Nov 29, 2002
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