Printer Friendly

THREE PARTNERS JOINING FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY LAB.

Byline: Jim Skeen Staff Writer

PALMDALE - Palmdale, Lockheed Martin and the AERO Institute will partner to create a nanotechnology research laboratory, a project supporters said will bolster the region's aerospace industry and enhance educational opportunities in the Antelope Valley.

The city of Palmdale will spend $350,000 for equipment for the laboratory, which will be housed in the former courthouse building in the city's civic center that now houses AERO Institute. Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co. will provide the management of the laboratory at no cost.

Lockheed Martin contracts with universities across the country for research projects. The new laboratory will give the company another outlet for its research that is just minutes away from its Palmdale plant. The company also hopes to attract and retain engineers, which are in short supply.

``Having research right outside their door helps them enhance their capabilities and helps them grow,'' said Kim Shaw, a consultant hired by the city to find ways to bolster the region's aerospace industry.

Nanotechnology is the development of circuits and devices from single atoms and molecules. The technology could lead to creating devices such as sensors that are smaller and more efficiently packaged than today's sensors.

The AERO Institute, formed two years ago, is a partnership composed of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base; the nonprofit California Space Grant Foundation; the California Space Grant Consortium, part of the NASA-sponsored National Space Grant Foundation with more than 800 affiliate colleges and universities; NASA Ames Research Center; and the California Space Institute of the University of California.

AERO - short for Aerospace Education Research Operations - evolved out of concerns over the lack of engineering and technical training opportunities in the Antelope Valley. The institute is working on programs for ``K to Gray'' - meaning everything from programs to enhance K-12 education in math and science to post-graduate degrees to continuing education programs, said Susan Miller, NASA Dryden's director of academic investments.

Part of the vision for the institute is the creation of a multiuse laboratory complex that could be used by students and companies needing a place to do research, Miller said.

Jim Skeen, (661) 267-5743

james.skeen(at)dailynews.com
COPYRIGHT 2006 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2006, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Jan 25, 2006
Words:362
Previous Article:PULSE JUMPIN' JACK FLASH THINK YOU'RE IN GOOD SHAPE? TALK TO FITNESS GURU JACK LALANNE.
Next Article:WILD CRITTERS NO MORE LLAMAS, ALPACAS NOW ARE FARM ANIMALS.
Topics:


Related Articles
Under your skin: nanotechnology is the latest weapon in the battle to be beautiful.
Forbes launches newsletter on nanotechnology.
COLLEGE TO OPEN BIOTECH CENTER STUDENTS TO GET TRAINING IN 'CLEAN ROOM' LAB.
Microscopic machinery: moving nanotechnology research into market remains a challenge.
"Small Times" magazine acquired by Pennwell.
"Hello, Nanotech University": American research universities are helping to build a community of nanotech scholar practioners.
Donation boosts science buildings.
COURTHOUSE NOW TECHNOLOGY HUB FOR MANY SCHOOLS.
The division of extramural research and training welcomes two new program administrators.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters