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Strike by 100,000 film workers brings Bollywood to a standstill

More than 100,000 workers in Bollywood Bollywood

Indian moviemaking industry that began in Bombay (now Mumbai) in the 1930s and developed into an enormous film empire. Bombay Talkies, launched in 1934 by Himansu Rai, spearheaded the growth of Indian cinema.
 went on indefinite INDEFINITE. That which is undefined; uncertain.

INDEFINITE, NUMBER. A number which may be increased or diminished at pleasure.
     2. When a corporation is composed of an indefinite number of persons, any number of them consisting of a majority of those
 strike yesterday over low wages, late pay and the expanding casual labour force in the industry - a move which threatens to close cinemas in India during the busy festival season.

Big names such as Shah Rukh Shah Rukh or Shah Rokh or Shahrokh means side projection of the king's face in Persian. The name can also refer to:
  • Shahrokh Music - Persian musician
  • Shah Rukh Khan - Bollywood actor
Shah Rukh (Shah Rokh, Shahrokh
 Khan khan

Historically, the ruler or monarch of a Mongol tribe. Early on a distinction was made between the title of khan and that of khakan, or “great khan.” Later the term khan was adopted by the Seljuq and Khwarezm-Shah dynasties as a title for the highest
 and Amitabh Bachchan “Bachchan” redirects here. For other uses, see Bachchan (disambiguation).

Amitabh Bachchan (born October 11, 1942) (/əmitaːbʱ bətʃtʃən/ 
 have joined dancers, writers and technicians in the "non-cooperation" strike in Mumbai, home to India's prolific movie industry.

Dinesh Chaturvedi, the head of the Federation of Western India Cine Employees (FWICE FWICE Federation of Western India Cine Employees ), said 147,000 people had stayed at home and that poor pay was the heart of the issue. "A film worker gets 600 rupees [£7.50] per day and a television worker gets paid 500 rupees per day. The least the producers can do is pay them on time," he said.

The union's decision to go on strike - the first in 50 years - could not have come at a worse time. Indian cinema is recognised as a critical and commercial success - with annual ticket sales of 3.6bn.

With so much at stake, both sides are hopeful of an early resolution. Studios and producers in Mumbai said the problem was with "contractors" who were paid to find staff for Bollywood productions but often failed to pay workers agreed rates.

Ratan Jain, the president of the Association of Motion Picture and TV Programme Producers, said it was "a few unscrupulous people in the industry". "More than 100 films have stopped production. All the studios are shut. Artists who have been booked months ahead will now demand more money to turn up again."
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Author:guardian.co.uk
Publication:guardian.co.uk
Date:Oct 2, 2008
Words:262
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