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St. John and Beaumont Hospitals Are First in Michigan To Use Talent Graft Treatment for Aortic Aneurysm.

DETROIT, Sept. 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Doctors at St. John Hospital and Medical Center and William Beaumont Hospital are testing a promising treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm that is easier on the patient and is expected to cut hospitalization and recovery time in half.

Vascular surgeons Michael Khoury, MD, and Kumara Rama, MD, both of St. John, and Paul G. Bove, MD, of Beaumont, have joined forces in the clinical research study of a synthetic stent graft that is placed in the aorta to cut off blood flow to an aneurysm and prevent its rupture.

An aneurysm is a weakened area of the artery wall that balloons outward. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are most commonly diagnosed in people 65-80 years of age, affecting one-to-three percent of people in that age range. If left untreated, the aneurysm can rupture and ruptured aneurysms are usually fatal. Untreated abdominal aortic aneurysms account for 15,000 deaths each year in the United States.

St. John and Beaumont are among a group of 14 hospitals nationwide -- and the only ones in Michigan -- that were selected as test sites for the Talent Endoluminal Stent Graft System. The two hospitals combined their expertise in order to qualify as a test site for the trial, and to expand the procedure's availability for people in the Detroit metropolitan area.

"The expandable graft is inserted through a small incision in the groin, then guided into position using fluoroscopy, a type of X-ray," said Dr. Bove. "Once in place, the graft is inflated so it fits snugly inside the aorta, cutting off blood flow to the aneurysm and hopefully causing it to shrink over time."

"Conventional repair of aortic aneurysms is a major surgical procedure requiring general anesthesia, a 12-inch abdominal incision, and aortic bypass with blood loss and transfusions," Dr. Khoury said. "Patients require a hospital stay of seven-to-ten days, and a recuperation period of four-to-six weeks."

In contrast, the investigational graft surgery requires just two groin incisions of five inches or less, and is performed under spinal anesthesia. After surgery, it is anticipated the patient will stay in the hospital for just three days, and resume most normal activities in two weeks.

Another advantage of using the synthetic graft is that it can be used for high-risk patients, who might otherwise not be candidates for conventional surgical repair because of severe lung or heart disorders.

The research trials at St. John and Beaumont will include people considered to be high-risk, as well as those with low-to-moderate risk. The procedure is also an option for people who are not candidates for surgery.

For further information on the research trials, call St. John at 313-884-7007 or Beaumont at 248-551-1465.

St. John Hospital and Medical Center is the flagship hospital of St. John Health System, a growing network of community-based health care services including nine hospitals and more than 100 ambulatory and medical offices located throughout Wayne, Macomb, Oakland and St. Clair counties.

Beaumont is comprised of two hospitals with five medical office buildings, a rehabilitation and health center, a primary care clinic, five nursing care centers, a research institute, a home care service and a hospice. Beaumont's 929-bed hospital in Royal Oak is a Level 1 Trauma Center that is one of the busiest hospitals in the nation for inpatient admissions and surgeries. Beaumont's 189-bed acute care community hospital in Troy is among the nation's busiest smaller hospitals.
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 28, 1998
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