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Spring [way] ahead!

Every year since 1986, Americans would "spring ahead" on the first Sunday in April. But this year, daylight saving time (DST) arrived on March 11--three weeks early. Get used to it: The switch to the second Sunday in March was mandated by a 2005 act of Congress. The goal was to save on electricity and oil used to light roadways, homes, and other buildings.

Daylight saving time isn't observed everywhere in the country. Hawaii is a longtime holdout. Half of Indiana was too, until last year. Arizona's Navajo reservations observe DST, but the rest of the state doesn't.

Confused? If so, you probably aren't the only one. Many ATMs, VCRs, and other electronic devices were programmed to turn an hour ahead on the first Sunday in April. Some may have to be reprogrammed; others will be an hour late until April 1.

By the way, DST's end date is different too. You'll have to "turn back" on the first Sunday in November instead of the last one in October.
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Title Annotation:National
Publication:Junior Scholastic
Date:Mar 12, 2007
Words:169
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