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Spread the word.



ESSENTIAL INFORMATION

AGE GROUP: middle and high school students

NUMBER OF KIDS: 12 or more, working in teams of three for classroom visits

NUMBER OF ADULTS: 1 per visit

TIME: 3 weeks

RESOURCES: paper, fact sheets, downloaded information and photographs from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids Web site, video recorder See DVR, DVD-R and DVD drives.  and videotapes (if available)

COST: $12-$20

Activity Overview: With a team of three students and one adult, plan a visit to third- and fourth-grade elementary school elementary school: see school.  classes in your neighborhood so you can educate students about the tobacco industry and the harmful effects of smoking.

Why Do It: Studies show that some kids as young as in fifth grade are starting to smoke. (5) Because you are role models for these kids, your words and actions can have a powerful impact on their attitudes about smoking.

What to Do

Three Weeks Before: With the help of an adult advisor, decide which schools in your community you would like to visit. Research the addresses and phone numbers of the schools so you can contact the principals.

Write a phone script (1) A program written in a general-purpose programming language. Such languages are typically interpreted and less comprehensive than full-blown compiled languages. See scripting language and interpreter.  that you can refer to when calling the schools you would like to visit. Be sure to include your name, school, explanation of the project, and why you specifically want to visit the third- and fourth-grade classrooms. Request permission to videotape videotape

Magnetic tape used to record visual images and sound, or the recording itself. There are two types of videotape recorders, the transverse (or quad) and the helical.
 your first presentation. Explain that you will be bringing an adult along on your visit.

Ask for the principal's permission in writing before going forward with your plans.

Two Weeks Before: Research the latest statistics on tobacco use, money spent on marketing by tobacco companies, advertising aimed at kids, and the deadly (and disgusting) effects of tobacco use. Incorporate these facts into your presentation.

Contact the teacher(s) whose classes you'll you'll  

Contraction of you will.


you'll you will or you shall
you'll will
 be visiting. If possible, meet them in advance to talk about the visit and your presentation. Provide an outline of your presentation and discuss whether the content and information is appropriate for their students.

Work on your presentation: Keep it simple, entertaining, and brief. Fifteen to twenty minutes is long enough. You may want to use props prop 1  
n.
1. An object placed beneath or against a structure to keep it from falling or shaking; a support.

2. One that serves as a means of support or assistance.

tr.v.
 to illustrate the importance of keeping your lungs lungs, elastic organs used for breathing in vertebrate animals, excluding most fish, which use gills, and a few amphibian species that respire through the skin. The word is sometimes applied to the respiratory apparatus of lower animals.  healthy. Allow time for questions.

One Week Before: With a friend, rehearse re·hearse  
v. re·hearsed, re·hears·ing, re·hears·es

v.tr.
1.
a. To practice (a part in a play, for example) in preparation for a public performance.

b.
 to perfect your presentation. Practice answering tough questions. Arrange for transportation to and from the elementary school on the day of your visit.

During Your First Visit: Videotape your presentation. Afterward af·ter·ward   also af·ter·wards
adv.
At a later time; subsequently.

Adv. 1. afterward - happening at a time subsequent to a reference time; "he apologized subsequently"; "he's going to the store but he'll be back here
, review the tape to make sure your message is effective, and look for ways to make your presentation even better as you visit other classrooms. Be sure to answer students' questions as thoroughly as possible.

Next Steps

* Extend the reach of your presentations through these activities. Ask other teachers or youth group advisors to show your video to their students and discuss its impact.

* Send a letter and a copy of the videotape to your local cable and public access stations. Tell them you are available to discuss your "Spread the Word" project.

Another Idea

Skit: Create a skit about the dangers of tobacco and perform it for students in your school.
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Title Annotation:Student Reproducible
Publication:Junior Scholastic
Date:Feb 21, 2005
Words:512
Previous Article:Dear parent or guardian.
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