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Spooktacular costume ideas.

The following are some of the ghoulishly great creations EP readers have shared. Thanks to everyone for their submissions and we wish we had room for all! Happy Trick-or-Treating!

Jackson's Costume through the years by Laura Fischler

These are Halloween costumes I have put together for my son, Jackson, over the years. He enjoys the attention his costumes get, and the fun of going trick-or-treating. Jackson is tube fed, so apart from a little taste of chocolate on the lips, he gives away all of his candy to family and friends. For this reason, it is important to me that Jackson has a blast on Halloween night!

1997--JACK IN THE BOX--

(When he was 5)--a cardboard box attached to the chair with bungee cord is covered and decorated in felt. It is part of another box on the back of his chair for the top, that is also covered in felt. I found the jester hat in a fabric store. He wore a red turtleneck and makeup. He had a switch on the box, which said "Pop goes the weasel!" when he hit it.

1998--POLICEMAN JACK--

(Jackson loved dressing up as a policeman when he was 6)--He had gotten the policeman's hat and badges for the previous Christmas. A simple dark blue shirt with a red felt badge sewn on the arm (very lightly for easy removal) and gray slacks with wing-tip shoes he had worn for a wedding completed the outfit. Again, a cut up cardboard box, which was painted like one of his toy police cars, was tied on to his chair with bungee cords. A wooden laundry rack was attached to the back of the chair and behind bars, propped up, was a"criminal" stuffed animal. Flashlights were tied to the top and stuck through the front of the car. The headlights were covered in orange cellophane and all lights stayed on.

1999--"PAT SAY JACKSON"--

(Wheel of Fortune was one of Jackson's favorite shows at age 7)--The outfit was a borrowed jacket and the same blue shirt he wore the previous year, with a tie added. The wheel is a piece of adapted equipment with a thin round piece of wood screwed into a small wooden post. I painted the wheel and tacked it down to the top and then tied the post on to his chair with bungee cord. On the back of his chair is a piece of thick, painted, poster board and a borrowed, dressed-up Barbie is hanging on it as his very own Vanna. Two flashlights were attached above the front wheels and pointed at his face as spotlights.

2000--"Jackalooney Petty"--

(At age 8, Jackson loved to race ears)--We bought an inexpensive race car driver's set that had the helmet and flags. It is not shown in the picture, but the trophy from the set was mounted on the dashboard. An inexpensive Halloween costume was also painted to look more like a racing outfit, with white turtleneck underneath for the cool evening. The very cool shades were perched on top of his head. Gloves and a toy steering wheel he had received for the previous Christmas finished the outfit. The cardboard box was painted to look like a car. Part of another box was cut out and covered in cellophane for the windshield. "Tap" lights were pushed through the box for headlights. A flat tire lay on the hood of his car and was made of insulation tube wrapped around cardboard and painted spokes.

Tonka Loader costume by Tamy Otto

Our son Aaron is 3 and has cerebral palsy. Last year was the first year he had his Kid Kart. I thought it would be a cute idea to make it into a Tonka Loader, since his father is in the construction business and uses heavy duty equipment. This year, Aaron is going to be a Zamboni machine. The possibilities for Halloween costumes are unlimited when you have a wheelchair to work with--a little cardboard and paint and you're all set!

Daniels Astronaut Costume by Lillian Barnhart

My son Daniel has spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, and after a vacation to Forida and a visit to NASA, he became fascinated with the whole astronaut theme. He wants to be an astronaut when he grows up, so what better costume for Halloween?

Daniel's grandmother is a wonderful seamstress and always creates wonderful Halloween costumes for Daniel. We found an astronaut costume pattern in McCall's pattern book. It was a simple one-piece jumper and detachable hood. We found a silver metallic quilted material and the project began. We attached an American flag patch on the front with a safety pin and the costume was finished.

To make the space shuttle:

First you need to find a good-sized box that will fit over the wheelchair. If the box is deep, you will need to cut about 1/4 of it down, cut the flaps off, and leave a little in front for the windshield.

On the underside of the box, cut off the smaller flaps, but leave the longer ones for the wings. After you cut the flaps into wings, they may not be long enough. To make them longer, duct tape the smaller flaps to the wings. Then spray paint the box white.

The nose piece is a large plastic chip bowl with another smaller bowl on top (cheap Dollar Store bowls work nicely). Duct tape the bowls together, taping from the bottom of the larger bowl to the smaller bowl and back again until all covered. I attached the nose to the shuttle by making holes on four sides of the bowl and matching holes on the shuttle front and affixing it with twist ties.

The turbo thrusters are just three plastic 20-ounce cups wrapped in aluminum foil attached with metal ties. Make a hole in the bottom of the cup and attach to back of shut tie in a triangle pattern.

I added extra foil in the cups and the curled red ribbon to come out of the thruster like fire. The ribbon is held in place with extra foil.

I have a talented friend who painted the flags and the lettering on the shuttle. We painted front windows grey and black and the bottom of the shuttle with black paint, but you could use flag stickers and lettering to write United States, USA, and NASA. It seems really complicated, but the whole shuttle took three hours to make. And it is worth it to see your child "flying" around. My son won first place at our local mall costume contest. He was very proud, as was I!
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Publication:The Exceptional Parent
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Oct 1, 2001
Words:1110
Previous Article:Jami's toys. (Toys).
Next Article:Tips for a safe halloween. (what's happening).
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