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Section VII: appendices.



Appendix appendix, small, worm-shaped blind tube, about 3 in. (7.6 cm) long and 1-4 in. to 1 in. (.64–2.54 cm) thick, projecting from the cecum (part of the large intestine) on the right side of the lower abdominal cavity.  I--Methodology

Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR (Under Color Removal) A method for reducing the amount of printing ink used. It substitutes black for gray color (equal amounts of cyan, magenta and yellow). Thus black ink is used instead of the three CMY inks. See GCR and dot gain. ) Program contributors forward crime data to the FBI either directly from local law enforcement agencies A law enforcement agency (LEA) is a term used to describe any agency which enforces the law. This may be a local or state police, federal agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) or the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).  or through state UCR Programs in 46 states and the District of Columbia District of Columbia, federal district (2000 pop. 572,059, a 5.7% decrease in population since the 1990 census), 69 sq mi (179 sq km), on the east bank of the Potomac River, coextensive with the city of Washington, D.C. (the capital of the United States). . The FBI provides continuing guidance and support to individual contributing agencies in those states that do not have a state Program.

State UCR Programs are very effective liaisons between local contributors and the FBI. Many of the Programs have mandatory reporting mandatory reporting The obligatory reporting of a particular condition to local or state health authorities, as required for communicable disease and substance abuse Infectious disease State boards of health maintain records and collect data resulting from MR of  requirements and collect data beyond the national UCR scope to address crime problems germane ger·mane  
adj.
Being both pertinent and fitting. See Synonyms at relevant.



[Middle English germain, having the same parents, closely connected; see german2.
 to their particular locales. In most cases, these state agencies are also able to provide more direct and frequent service to participating law enforcement agencies, to make information more readily available for use at the state level, and to contribute to more streamlined operations at the national level.

With the implementation of state crime reporting Programs, the national UCR Program ceased direct collection of data from individual law enforcement agencies within those states. Currently, the state data collection agency forwards information it receives from local agencies to the national Program.

The criteria criteria (krītēr´ē),
n.
 established for state Programs ensure consistency Consistency can refer to:
  • Consistency proof, in mathematics, logic, and theoretical physics
  • Consistency (statistics), a property of estimators and estimation
 and comparability in the data submitted to the national Program, as well as regular and timely reporting. These criteria are: (1) The state Program must conform to Verb 1. conform to - satisfy a condition or restriction; "Does this paper meet the requirements for the degree?"
fit, meet

coordinate - be co-ordinated; "These activities coordinate well"
 national UCR Program standards, definitions, and information requirements The information needed to support a business or other activity. Systems analysts turn information requirements (the what and when) into functional specifications (the how) of an information system. . The states are not, of course, prohibited pro·hib·it  
tr.v. pro·hib·it·ed, pro·hib·it·ing, pro·hib·its
1. To forbid by authority: Smoking is prohibited in most theaters. See Synonyms at forbid.

2.
 from collecting other statistical data beyond the national requirements. (2) The state criminal justice agency must have a proven, effective, statewide Program and demonstrate acceptable quality control procedures. (3) Coverage within the state by a state agency must be, at least, equal to that attained at·tain  
v. at·tained, at·tain·ing, at·tains

v.tr.
1. To gain as an objective; achieve: attain a diploma by hard work.

2.
 by the national UCR Program. (4) The state agency must have adequate field staff assigned as·sign  
tr.v. as·signed, as·sign·ing, as·signs
1. To set apart for a particular purpose; designate: assigned a day for the inspection.

2.
 to conduct audits and to assist contributing agencies in recordkeeping practices and crime-reporting procedures. (5) The state agency must furnish fur·nish  
tr.v. fur·nished, fur·nish·ing, fur·nish·es
1. To equip with what is needed, especially to provide furniture for.

2.
 the FBI with all of the detailed data regularly collected by the FBI in the form of duplicate DUPLICATE. The double of anything.
     2. It is usually applied to agreements, letters, receipts, and the like, when two originals are made of either of them. Each copy has the same effect.
 returns, computer printouts, and/or and/or  
conj.
Used to indicate that either or both of the items connected by it are involved.

Usage Note: And/or is widely used in legal and business writing.
 magnetic tapes. (6) The state agency must have the proven capability (tested over a period of time) to supply all the statistical data required in time to meet deadlines established for publication of the national Uniform Crime Reports.

To fulfill ful·fill also ful·fil  
tr.v. ful·filled, ful·fill·ing, ful·fills also ful·fils
1. To bring into actuality; effect: fulfilled their promises.

2.
 its responsibilities in connection with the UCR Program, the FBI continues to edit To make a change to existing data. See update.

(application) edit - Use of some kind of editor program to modify a document. Also used to refer to the modification itself, e.g. "my last edit only made things worse".
 and review individual agency reports for both completeness and quality. National UCR Program staff have direct contact with individual contributors within the state as necessary in connection with crime reporting matters, coordinating co·or·di·nate  
n.
1. One that is equal in importance, rank, or degree.

2. coordinates A set of articles, as of clothing or luggage, designed to match or complement one other, as in style or color.

3.
 such contact with the state agency. On request, staff members conduct training programs within the state on law enforcement recordkeeping and crime reporting procedures. Should circumstances CIRCUMSTANCES, evidence. The particulars which accompany a fact.
     2. The facts proved are either possible or impossible, ordinary and probable, or extraordinary and improbable, recent or ancient; they may have happened near us, or afar off; they are public or
 develop whereby the state agency does not comply with the aforementioned a·fore·men·tioned  
adj.
Mentioned previously.

n.
The one or ones mentioned previously.


aforementioned
Adjective

mentioned before

Adj. 1.
 requirements, the national Program may reinstitute a direct collection of Uniform Crime Reports from law enforcement agencies within the state.

Reporting Procedures

Based on records of all reports of crime received from victims, officers who discover infractions, or other sources, law enforcement agencies across the country tabulate (1) To arrange data into a columnar format.

(2) To sum and print totals.
 the number of Crime Index (Part I) offenses brought to their attention each month. Specifically, the Index crimes reported to the FBI are murder and nonnegligent manslaughter manslaughter, homicide committed without justification or excuse but distinguished from murder by the absence of the element of malice aforethought. Modern criminal statutes usually divide it into degrees, the most common distinction being between voluntary and , forcible forc·i·ble  
adj.
1. Effected against resistance through the use of force: The police used forcible restraint in order to subdue the assailant.

2. Characterized by force; powerful.
 rape, robbery robbery, in law, felonious taking of property from a person against his will by threatening or committing force or violence. The injury or threat may be directed against the person robbed, his property, or the person or property of his relative or of anyone in his , aggravated assault A person is guilty of aggravated assault if he or she attempts to cause serious bodily injury to another or causes such injury purposely, knowingly, or recklessly under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life; or attempts to cause or purposely or , burglary burglary, at common law, the breaking and entering of a dwelling house of another at night with the intent to commit a felony, whether the intent is carried out or not. , larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft Motor vehicle theft or grand theft auto is a criminal act of theft generally understood to refer to the stealing of automobiles, buses, motorcycles, snowmobiles, trucks, trailers or any other motorized vehicle legally allowed on public roads and highways, including attempted , and arson arson, at common law, the malicious and willful burning of the house of another. Originally, it was an offense against the security of habitation rather than against property rights. .

Whenever complaints of crime are determined through investigation to be unfounded or false, they are eliminated from an agency's count. Agencies report to the FBI the number of actual offenses known regardless of whether anyone is arrested for the crime, stolen property is recovered, or prosecution prosecution n. 1) in criminal law, the government attorney charging and trying the case against a person accused of a crime. 2) a common term for the government's side in a criminal case, as in "the prosecution will present five witnesses" or "the prosecution rests"  is undertaken.

Another integral part of the monthly submission Submission
Elliott, Anne

reluctantly gives up her fiancé on her family’s advice. [Br. Lit.: Jane Austen Persuasion in Magill I, 734]
 is the total number of actual Crime Index offenses cleared. Crimes are cleared in one of two ways: (1) by arrest of at least one person, who is charged and turned over to the court for prosecution, or (2) by exceptional means when some element beyond law enforcement control precludes the arrest of a known offender offender n. an accused defendant in a criminal case or one convicted of a crime. (See: defendant, accused) . Law enforcement agencies also report the number of Index crime clearances that involve only offenders under the age of 18, the value of property stolen and recovered in connection with the offenses, and detailed information pertaining per·tain  
intr.v. per·tained, per·tain·ing, per·tains
1. To have reference; relate: evidence that pertains to the accident.

2.
 to criminal homicide homicide (hŏm`əsīd), in law, the taking of human life. Homicides that are neither justifiable nor excusable are considered crimes. A criminal homicide committed with malice is known as murder, otherwise it is called manslaughter.  and arson.

In addition to its primary collection of Crime Index (Part I) offenses, the UCR Program solicits monthly data on persons arrested for all crimes except traffic violations. The age, sex, and race of arrestees are reported by crime category, both Part I and Part II. Part II offenses include all crimes not classified as Part I.

Monthly data are also collected on law enforcement officers killed or assaulted. The number of full-time full-time
adj.
Employed for or involving a standard number of hours of working time: a full-time administrative assistant.



full
 sworn and civilian CIVILIAN. A doctor, professor, or student of the civil law.  personnel are reported as of October October: see month.  31 of each year.

At the end of each quarter, summary information is collected on hate crimes, i.e., specific offenses that were motivated mo·ti·vate  
tr.v. mo·ti·vat·ed, mo·ti·vat·ing, mo·ti·vates
To provide with an incentive; move to action; impel.



mo
 by an offender's bias against the race, religion, ethnic origin, sexual orientation sexual orientation
n.
The direction of one's sexual interest toward members of the same, opposite, or both sexes, especially a direction seen to be dictated by physiologic rather than sociologic forces.
, or physical or mental disability of the victim. Hate crime data from those agencies participating in the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS NIBRS National Incident-Based Reporting System (US DoD) ) are submitted monthly.

Editing Procedures

Each report submitted to the UCR Program is thoroughly examined for arithmetical accuracy and for deviations which may indicate errors. To identify any unusual fluctuations in an agency's crime count, UCR staff compare monthly reports with previous submissions of the agency and with those for similar agencies. Large variations in crime levels may indicate modified mod·i·fy  
v. mod·i·fied, mod·i·fy·ing, mod·i·fies

v.tr.
1. To change in form or character; alter.

2.
 records procedures, incomplete reporting, or changes in the jurisdiction's geopolitical ge·o·pol·i·tics  
n. (used with a sing. verb)
1. The study of the relationship among politics and geography, demography, and economics, especially with respect to the foreign policy of a nation.

2.
a.
 structure.

Data reliability is a high priority of the Program, and noted deviations or arithmetical adjustments are brought to the attention of the state UCR Program or the submitting agency. A standard procedure of the FBI is to study the monthly reports and to evaluate periodic trends prepared for individual reporting units. Any significant increase or decrease becomes the subject of a special inquiry. Changes in crime reporting procedures or annexations can influence the level of reported crime. When this occurs, the figures for specific crime categories or totals, if necessary, are excluded from trend tabulations.

To assist contributors in complying with UCR standards, the national Program provides training seminars and instructional materials on crime reporting procedures. Throughout the country, the national UCR Program maintains liaison Liaison may refer to:
  • Liaison (French), the pronunciation of a word-final consonant due to a following vowel sound in French
  • Liaison officer a military officer who coordinates different forces or national units usually at staff level
 with state Programs and law enforcement personnel and holds training sessions to explain the purpose of the Program, the rules of uniform classification and scoring, and the methods of assembling the information for reporting. When an individual agency has specific problems in compiling com·pile  
tr.v. com·piled, com·pil·ing, com·piles
1. To gather into a single book.

2. To put together or compose from materials gathered from several sources:
 its crime statistics and its remedial REMEDIAL. That which affords a remedy; as, a remedial statute, or one which is made to supply some defects or abridge some superfluities of the common law. 1 131. Com. 86. The term remedial statute is also applied to those acts which give a new remedy. Esp. Pen. Act. 1.  efforts are unsuccessful, personnel from the FBI's Criminal Justice Information Services Division The Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) is a division of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). A computerized criminal justice information system that is a counterpart of FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) in  may visit the contributor to aid in resolving the difficulties.

The Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook
For the handbook about Wikipedia, see .

This article is about reference works. For the subnotebook computer, see .
"Pocket reference" redirects here.
, which details procedures for classifying and scoring offenses, is supplied to all contributors as the basic resource document for preparing reports. Because a good records system is essential for accurate crime reporting, the FBI also furnishes the Manual of Law Enforcement Records.

To enhance communication among Program participants, letters to UCR contributors and UCR State Program Bulletins are produced as needed as needed prn. See prn order. . These provide policy updates and new information, as well as clarification Clarification

The removal of small amounts of fine, particulate solids from liquids. The purpose is almost invariably to improve the quality of the liquid, and the removed solids often are discarded.
 of reporting issues.

The final responsibility for data submissions rests with the individual contributing law enforcement agency Noun 1. law enforcement agency - an agency responsible for insuring obedience to the laws
FBI, Federal Bureau of Investigation - a federal law enforcement agency that is the principal investigative arm of the Department of Justice
. Although the Program makes every effort through its editing procedures, training practices, and correspondence to assure the validity of the data it receives, the accuracy of the statistics depends primarily on the adherence adherence /ad·her·ence/ (ad-her´ens) the act or condition of sticking to something.

immune adherence
 of each contributor to the established standards of reporting. Deviations from these established standards, which cannot be resolved by the national UCR Program, may be brought to the attention of the Criminal Justice Information Systems Committees of the International Association of Chiefs of Police
For other uses of the acronym IACP, please see the IACP disambiguation page.


The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) was founded in Chicago in 1893 as the National Chiefs of Police Union.
 and the National Sheriffs' Association The National Sheriffs' Association (NSA) is a U.S. non-profit trade association dedicated to raising the level of professionalism among U.S.sheriffs, their deputies and others in the fields of criminal justice and public safety. .

Arrest Data

Florida Florida, state, United States
Florida (flôr`ĭdə, flŏr`–), state in the extreme SE United States. A long, low peninsula between the Atlantic Ocean (E) and the Gulf of Mexico (W), Florida is bordered by Georgia and
 state arrest data are not included in Tables 30-68. Limited arrest data were received from Illinois Illinois, river, United States
Illinois, river, 273 mi (439 km) long, formed by the confluence of the Des Plaines and Kankakee rivers, NE Ill., and flowing SW to the Mississippi at Grafton, Ill. It is an important commercial and recreational waterway.
, Kansas Kansas, state, United States
Kansas (kăn`zəs), midwestern state occupying the center of the coterminous United States. It is bordered by Missouri (E), Oklahoma (S), Colorado (W), and Nebraska (N).
, Kentucky Kentucky, state, United States
Kentucky (kəntŭk`ē, kĭn–), one of the so-called border states of the S central United States. It is bordered by West Virginia and Virginia (E); Tennessee (S); the Mississippi R.
, Montana Montana (mŏntăn`ə), Rocky Mt. state in the NW United States. It is bounded by North Dakota and South Dakota (E), Wyoming (S), Idaho (W), and the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan (N). , South Carolina South Carolina, state of the SE United States. It is bordered by North Carolina (N), the Atlantic Ocean (SE), and Georgia (SW). Facts and Figures


Area, 31,055 sq mi (80,432 sq km). Pop. (2000) 4,012,012, a 15.
, South Dakota South Dakota (dəkō`tə), state in the N central United States. It is bordered by North Dakota (N), Minnesota and Iowa (E), Nebraska (S), and Wyoming and Montana (W). , and Wisconsin Wisconsin, state, United States
Wisconsin (wĭskŏn`sən, –sĭn), upper midwestern state of the United States. It is bounded by Lake Superior and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, from which it is divided by the Menominee
. No 2001 arrest data were received from the District of Columbia. Complete 12-month arrest figures for New York City New York City: see New York, city.
New York City

City (pop., 2000: 8,008,278), southeastern New York, at the mouth of the Hudson River. The largest city in the U.S.
 were not available for inclusion in this book. Arrest totals for these areas, however, were estimated for inclusion in Table 29, "Estimated Arrests, United States United States, officially United States of America, republic (2005 est. pop. 295,734,000), 3,539,227 sq mi (9,166,598 sq km), North America. The United States is the world's third largest country in population and the fourth largest country in area. , 2001."

Population

Prior to preparation of 2001 Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program population estimates, 2000 Bureau of the Census Noun 1. Bureau of the Census - the bureau of the Commerce Department responsible for taking the census; provides demographic information and analyses about the population of the United States
Census Bureau
 (BOC (Bell Operating Company) One of 22 companies that was formerly part of AT&T and later organized into seven regional companies. See RBOC. ) decennial de·cen·ni·al  
adj.
1. Relating to or lasting for ten years.

2. Occurring every ten years.

n.
A tenth anniversary.
 data were incorporated into the UCR master file and adjustments for over or under estimation estimation

In mathematics, use of a function or formula to derive a solution or make a prediction. Unlike approximation, it has precise connotations. In statistics, for example, it connotes the careful selection and testing of a function called an estimator.
 of 2000 UCR population estimates were performed. In this edition, the state and national population figures are BOC 2001 state and national provisional Temporary; not permanent. Tentative, contingent, preliminary.

A provisional civil service appointment is a temporary position that fills a vacancy until a test can be properly administered and statutory requirements can be fulfilled to make a permanent appointment.
 estimates. Population figures for individual jurisdictions were updated by applying 2001 state growth rates Growth Rates

The compounded annualized rate of growth of a company's revenues, earnings, dividends, or other figures.

Notes:
Remember, historically high growth rates don't always mean a high rate of growth looking into the future.
 to 2000 BOC city/county decennial data to obtain 2001 city/county population estimates. The state growth rates were calculated using 2000 resident population counts and 2001 BOC state provisional estimates. The estimate of the U.S. population showed a 1.2-percent increase from 2000 to 2001.

NIBRS Conversion

Several states provide their UCR data in the expanded NIBRS format. For presentation in this book, NIBRS data were converted to the historical summary UCR formats. The NIBRS database was constructed to allow for such conversion so that UCR's long-running time series could continue.

Crime Trends

By showing fluctuations from year to year, trend statistics offer the data user an added perspective from which to study crime. Percent change tabulations in this publication are computed only for reporting units which have provided comparable data for the periods under consideration. Exclusions exclusions,
n.pl the dental services not covered under a dental benefits program.
 from trend computations are made when figures from a reporting agency are not received for comparable timeframes or when it is ascertained as·cer·tain  
tr.v. as·cer·tained, as·cer·tain·ing, as·cer·tains
1. To discover with certainty, as through examination or experimentation. See Synonyms at discover.

2.
 that unusual fluctuations are due to such variables as improved records procedures, annexations, etc.

Care should be exercised in making any direct comparison between data in this publication and those in prior issues of Crime in the United States Crime in the United States is characterized by relatively high levels of gun violence and homicide, compared to other developed countries although this is explained by the fact that criminals in America are more likely to use firearms. . For example, upon receiving 1995 aggravated assault figures for the state of Kentucky, it was determined the 1994 aggravated assault figures previously submitted were not valid; therefore, the Kentucky aggravated assault figures were not included in Tables 12 through 15 of the 1995 edition. The 1994 estimates in certain offense categories were updated for Delaware Delaware, state, United States
Delaware (dĕl`əwâr, –wər), one of the Middle Atlantic states of the United States, the country's second smallest state (after Rhode Island).
, Kansas, and Kentucky. In addition, Montana figures for 1995 were updated to show the actual offense data which were received after publication of Crime in the United States, 1995. These updates appear in the national trends.

Offense Estimation

Tables 1 through 5 and 7 of this publication contain statistics for the entire United States. Because not all law enforcement agencies provide data for complete reporting periods, estimated crime counts are included in these presentations. Offense estimation occurs within each of three areas: Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), cities outside MSAs, and rural counties. Using the known crime experiences of similar areas within a state, the estimates are computed by assigning as·sign  
tr.v. as·signed, as·sign·ing, as·signs
1. To set apart for a particular purpose; designate: assigned a day for the inspection.

2.
 the same proportional proportional

values expressed as a proportion of the total number of values in a series.


proportional dwarf
the patient is a miniature without disproportionate reductions or enlargements of body parts.
 crime volumes to nonreporting agencies. The size of agency; type of jurisdiction, e.g., police department versus sheriff's office; and geographic geographic /geo·graph·ic/ (je?o-graf´ik) in pathology, of or referring to a pattern that is well demarcated, resembling outlines on a map.

geographic

pertaining to geography.
 location are considered in the estimation process.

Due to the efforts to convert to NIBRS in recent years, it has become necessary to estimate totals for some states. The inability of some state UCR Programs to provide forcible rape figures in accordance Accordance is Bible Study Software for Macintosh developed by OakTree Software, Inc.[]

As well as a standalone program, it is the base software packaged by Zondervan in their Bible Study suites for Macintosh.
 with UCR guidelines guidelines,
n.pl a set of standards, criteria, or specifications to be used or followed in the performance of certain tasks.
 and other problems at the state level have also required unique estimation procedures. A summary of state-specific and offense-specific estimation procedures follows.
Year    State(s)                 Reason for Estimation

1985    Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

1986    Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

1987    Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

1988    Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

        Florida, Kentucky        Reporting problems at the state
                                 level resulted in no usable data.

1989    Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

1990    Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

1991    Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

        Iowa                     NIBRS conversion efforts resulted
                                 in estimation for Iowa.

1992    Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

1993    Michigan, Minnesota      The state UCR Programs were unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

        Kansas                   NIBRS conversion efforts resulted
                                 in estimation for Kansas.

        Illinois                 NIBRS conversion efforts resulted
                                 in estimation for Illinois.

                                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

1994    Illinois                 NIBRS conversion efforts resulted
                                 in estimation for Illinois.

                                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

        Kansas                   NIBRS conversion efforts resulted
                                 in estimation for Kansas.

        Montana                  The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1994 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

1995    Kansas                   The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1995 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1995 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Montana                  The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1995 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

1996    Florida                  The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1996 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1996 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Kansas                   The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1996 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Kentucky, Montana        The state UCR Programs were unable
                                 to provide complete 1996 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

1997    Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1997 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Kansas                   The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1997 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Kentucky, Montana,       The state UCR Programs were unable
        New Hampshire,           to provide complete 1997 offense
        Vermont                  figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

1998    Delaware                 Forcible rape figures supplied by
                                 the Delaware State Bureau of
                                 Investigation were not in
                                 accordance with national UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Kentucky, Montana,       The state UCR Programs were unable
        New Hampshire,           to provide complete 1998 offense
        Wisconsin                figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Kansas                   The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1998 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Vermont                  Due to changes in reporting
                                 procedures, the 1997 Vermont Crime
                                 Index offense totals were not
                                 comparable to those for 1998.

        Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1998 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

1999    Illinois                 The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1999 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Maine                    The Maine Department of Public
                                 Safety was unable to provide
                                 complete 1999 offense figures in
                                 accordance with UCR guidelines.

        Kansas, Kentucky,        The state UCR Programs were unable
        Montana                  to provide complete 1999 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        New Hampshire            The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 1999 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

2000    Kansas                   The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 2000 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Kentucky, Montana        The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 2000 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        llinois                  The state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 2000 offense
                                 figures or forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

2001    Kentucky                 The State UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide complete 2000 offense
                                 figures in accordance with UCR
                                 guidelines.

        Illinois                 The state UCR Program submitted
                                 complete data for only 7 agencies
                                 within the state. Additionally,
                                 the state UCR Program was unable
                                 to provide forcible rape figures
                                 in accordance with UCR guidelines.

Year    State(s)                 Estimation Method

1985    Illinois                 The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to the state.

1986    Illinois                 The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to the state.

1987    Illinois                 The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to the state.

1988    Illinois                 The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to the state.

        Florida, Kentucky        State totals were estimated by
                                 updating previous valid annual
                                 totals for individual
                                 jurisdictions, subdivided by
                                 population group. Percent changes
                                 for each offense within each
                                 population group of the geographic
                                 divisions in which the states
                                 reside were applied to the
                                 previous valid annual totals. The
                                 state totals were compiled from
                                 the sums of the population group
                                 estimates.

1989    Illinois                 The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to the state.

1990    Illinois                 The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to the state.

1991    Illinois                 The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to the state.

        Iowa                     State totals were estimated by
                                 updating previous valid annual
                                 totals for individual
                                 jurisdictions, subdivided by
                                 population group. Percent changes
                                 for each offense within each
                                 population group of the geographic
                                 divisions in which the states
                                 reside were applied to the
                                 previous valid annual totals. The
                                 state totals were compiled from
                                 the sums of the population group
                                 estimates.

1992    Illinois                 The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to the state.

1993    Michigan, Minnesota      The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to each state.

        Kansas                   Kansas totals were estimated by
                                 updating previous valid annual
                                 totals for individual
                                 jurisdictions, subdivided by
                                 population group. Percent changes
                                 for each offense within each
                                 population group of the West North
                                 Central Division were applied to
                                 the previous valid annual totals.
                                 The state totals were compiled
                                 from the sums of the population
                                 group estimates.

        Illinois                 Since valid annual totals were
                                 available for approximately 60
                                 Illinois agencies, those counts
                                 were maintained. The counts for
                                 the remaining jurisdictions were
                                 replaced with the most recent
                                 valid annual totals or were
                                 generated using standard
                                 estimation procedures. The results
                                 of all sources were then combined
                                 to arrive at the 1993 state total
                                 for Illinois.

                                 The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to the state.

1994    Illinois                 Illinois state totals were
                                 generated using only the valid
                                 crime rates for the East North
                                 Central Division. Within each
                                 population group, the state's
                                 offense totals were estimated
                                 based on the rate per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the remainder
                                 of the division.

                                 The rape totals were estimated
                                 using national rates per 100,000
                                 inhabitants within the eight
                                 population groups and assigning
                                 the forcible rape volumes
                                 proportionally to the state.

        Kansas                   Kansas state totals were generated
                                 using only the valid crime rates
                                 for the West North Central
                                 Division. Within each population
                                 group, the state's offense totals
                                 were estimated based on the rate
                                 per 100,000 inhabitants within the
                                 remainder of the division.

        Montana                  Montana totals were estimated by
                                 updating previous valid annual
                                 totals for individual
                                 jurisdictions, subdivided by
                                 population group. Percent changes
                                 for each offense within each
                                 population group of the Mountain
                                 Division were applied to the
                                 previous valid annual totals. The
                                 state totals were compiled from
                                 the sums of the population group
                                 estimates.

1995    Kansas                   The Kansas State UCR Program was
                                 able to provide valid 1994 state
                                 totals which were then updated
                                 using 1995 crime trends for the
                                 West North Central Division.

        Illinois                 Valid Crime Index counts were
                                 available for most of the largest
                                 cities. For other agencies, the
                                 only available counts were
                                 generated without application of
                                 the UCR Hierarchy Rule. (The
                                 Hierarchy Rule requires that only
                                 the most serious offense in a
                                 multiple-offense criminal incident
                                 is counted.) To arrive at a
                                 comparable state estimate to be
                                 included in national compilations,
                                 the total supplied by the Illinois
                                 State Program (which was inflated
                                 because of the nonapplication of
                                 the Hierarchy Rule) was reduced by
                                 the proportion of multiple
                                 offenses reported within single
                                 incidents in the available NIBRS
                                 data. Valid totals for the large
                                 cities were excluded from the
                                 reduction process.

        Montana                  Montana state estimates were
                                 computed by updating the previous
                                 valid annual totals using the 1994
                                 versus 1995 percent changes for
                                 the Mountain States.

1996    Florida                  The state UCR Program was able to
                                 provide an aggregated state total;
                                 data received from 94 individual
                                 Florida agencies are shown in the
                                 1996 jurisdictional figures
                                 presented in Tables 8 through 11.

        Illinois                 Valid Crime Index counts were
                                 available for most of the largest
                                 cities. For other agencies, the
                                 only available counts were
                                 generated without application of
                                 the UCR Hierarchy Rule. (The
                                 Hierarchy Rule requires that only
                                 the most serious offense in a
                                 multiple-offense criminal incident
                                 is counted.) To arrive at a
                                 comparable state estimate to be
                                 included in national compilations,
                                 the total supplied by the Illinois
                                 State Program (which was inflated
                                 because of the nonapplication of
                                 the Hierarchy Rule) was reduced by
                                 the proportion of multiple
                                 offenses reported within single
                                 incidents in the available NIBRS
                                 data. Valid totals for the large
                                 cities were excluded from the
                                 reduction process.

        Kansas                   Annual figures were extrapolated
                                 from 1996 January-June state
                                 totals provided by the Kansas
                                 State UCR Program.

        Kentucky, Montana        The 1995 and 1996 percent changes
                                 within each geographic division
                                 were applied to valid 1995 state
                                 totals to generate 1996 state
                                 totals.

1997    Illinois                 Valid Crime Index counts were
                                 available for most of the largest
                                 cities. For other agencies, the
                                 only available counts were
                                 generated withoutb application of
                                 the UCR Hierarchy Rule. (The
                                 Hierarchy Rule requires that only
                                 the most serious offense in a
                                 multiple-offense criminal incident
                                 is counted.) To arrive at a
                                 comparable state estimate to be
                                 included in national compilations,
                                 the total supplied by the Illinois
                                 State Program (which was inflated
                                 because of the nonapplication of
                                 the Hierarchy Rule) was reduced by
                                 the proportion of multiple
                                 offenses reported within single
                                 incidents in the available NIBRS
                                 data. Valid totals for the large
                                 cities were excluded from the
                                 reduction process.

        Kansas                   The Kansas state estimate was
                                 extrapolated from 1996
                                 January-June state totals provided
                                 by the Kansas State UCR Program.

        Kentucky, Montana,       The 1996 and 1997 percent changes
        New Hampshire,           registered for each geographic
                                 division in which the states of
                                 Kentucky, Montana, New Hampshire,
        Vermont                  and Vermont are categorized were
                                 applied to valid 1996 state totals
                                 to affect 1997 state totals.

1998    Delaware                 The 1998 forcible rape total for
                                 Delaware was estimated by reducing
                                 the number of reported offenses by
                                 the proportion of male forcible
                                 rape victims statewide.

        Kentucky, Montana,       State totals were estimated by
                                 using the 1997 figures for the
        New Hampshire,           nonreporting areas and applying
                                 1997 versus 1998 percentage
        Wisconsin                changes for the division in which
                                 each state is located. The
                                 estimates for the nonreporting
                                 areas were then increased by any
                                 actual 1998 crime counts received.

        Kansas                   To arrive at 1998 estimates, 1997
                                 state totals supplied by the
                                 Kansas State UCR Program were
                                 updated using 1998 crime trends
                                 for the West North Central
                                 Division.

        Vermont                  The 1998 Vermont Crime Index
                                 offense totals were excluded from
                                 Table 4. The 1997 Vermont state
                                 estimates were, however, retained
                                 in the aggregate national,
                                 regional, and divisional volume
                                 and rate totals.

        Illinois                 Valid Crime Index counts were
                                 available for most of the largest
                                 cities. For other agencies, the
                                 only available counts were
                                 generated without application of
                                 the UCR Hierarchy Rule. (The
                                 Hierarchy Rule requires that only
                                 the most serious offense in a
                                 multiple-offense criminal incident
                                 is counted.) To arrive at a
                                 comparable state estimate to be
                                 included in national compilations,
                                 the total supplied by the Illinois
                                 State Program (which was inflated
                                 because of the nonapplication of
                                 the Hierarchy Rule) was reduced by
                                 the proportion of multiple
                                 offenses reported within single
                                 incidents in the available NIBRS
                                 data. Valid totals for the large
                                 cities were excluded from the
                                 reduction process.

1999    Illinois                 Valid Crime Index counts were
                                 available for most of the largest
                                 cities. For other agencies, the
                                 only available counts were
                                 generated without application of
                                 the UCR Hierarchy Rule. (The
                                 Hierarchy Rule requires that only
                                 the most serious offense in a
                                 multiple-offense criminal incident
                                 is counted.) To arrive at a
                                 comparable state estimate to be
                                 included in national compilations,
                                 the total supplied by the Illinois
                                 State Program (which was inflated
                                 because of the nonapplication of
                                 the Hierarchy Rule) was reduced by
                                 the proportion of multiple
                                 offenses reported within single
                                 incidents in the available NIBRS
                                 data. Valid totals for the large
                                 cities were excluded from the
                                 reduction process.

        Maine                    The Maine Department of Public
                                 Safety forwarded monthly January
                                 through October crime counts for
                                 each law enforcement contributor;
                                 since 12 months of data were not
                                 received, the national Program
                                 estimated for the missing data
                                 following standard estimation
                                 procedures to arrive at a 1999
                                 state total.

        Kansas, Kentucky,        To arrive at 1999 estimates for
                                 Kansas, Kentucky, and Montana,
        Montana                  1998 state totals supplied by each
                                 state Uniform Crime Reporting
                                 Program were updated using 1999
                                 crime trends for the divisions in
                                 which each state is located.

        New Hampshire            The state total for New Hampshire
                                 was estimated by using the 1998
                                 figures for the 1999 nonreporting
                                 areas and applying the 2-year
                                 percent change for the New England
                                 Division.

2000    Kansas                   To arrive at 2000 estimates for
                                 Kansas, 1999 state estimates were
                                 updated using 2000 crime trends
                                 for the division in which it is
                                 located.

        Kentucky, Montana        To arrive at 2000 estimates for
                                 Kentucky and Montana, 1999 state
                                 totals supplied by each state Uniform
                                 Crime Reporting Program were
                                 updated using 2000 crime trends
                                 for the divisions in which each is
                                 located.

        llinois                  Valid Crime Index counts were
                                 available for most of the largest
                                 cities. For other agencies, the
                                 only available counts were
                                 generated without application of
                                 the UCR Hierarchy Rule. (The
                                 Hierarchy Rule requires that only
                                 the most serious offense in a
                                 multiple-offense criminal incident
                                 be counted.) To arrive at a
                                 comparable state estimate to be
                                 included in national compilation,
                                 the total supplied by the Illinois
                                 State Program (which was inflated
                                 due to the nonapplication of the
                                 Hierarchy Rule) was reduced by the
                                 proportion of multiple offenses
                                 reported within single incidents
                                 in the available NIBRS data. Valid
                                 totals for the large cities were
                                 excluded from the reduction
                                 process.

2001    Kentucky                 To arrive at the 2001 estimate for
                                 Kentucky, the 2000 state estimates
                                 were updated using 2001 crime
                                 trends reported for the East South
                                 Central Division in which it is
                                 located.

        Illinois                 Valid Crime Index counts were
                                 available for most of the largest
                                 cities. For other agencies, the
                                 only available counts were
                                 generated without application of
                                 the UCR Hierarchy Rule. (The
                                 Hierarchy Rule requires that only
                                 the most serious offense in a
                                 multiple-offense criminal incident
                                 is counted.) To arrive at a
                                 comparable state estimate to be
                                 included in national compilations,
                                 the total supplied by the Illinois
                                 State Program (which was inflated
                                 because of the nonapplication of
                                 the Hierarchy Rule) was reduced by
                                 the proportion of multiple
                                 offenses reported within single
                                 incidents in the available NIBRS
                                 data. Valid totals for the large
                                 cities were excluded from the
                                 reduction process.


Table Methodology

Although most law enforcement agencies submit crime reports to the UCR Program, data are sometimes not received for complete annual periods. To be included in this publication's Tables 8 through 11, which show specific jurisdictional statistics, figures for all 12 months of the current year must have been received at the FBI prior to established publication deadlines. Other tabular tab·u·lar
adj.
1. Having a plane surface; flat.

2. Organized as a table or list.

3. Calculated by means of a table.



tabular

resembling a table.
 presentations are aggregated on varied levels of submission. With the exception of the tables which consist of estimates for the total United States population, each table in this publication shows the number of agencies reporting and the extent of population coverage.

Designed to assist the reader, this table explains the construction of many of this book's tabular presentations.
  (1)                                  (2)
 Table                               Database

   1       All law enforcement agencies in the UCR
           Program. Crime statistics include estimated
           offense totals for agencies submitting less than
           12 months of offense reports for each year.

   2       All law enforcement agencies in the UCR
           Program. Crime statistics include estimated
           offense totals for agencies submitting less than
           12 months of offense reports.

   3       All law enforcement agencies in the UCR
           Program (including those submitting less than
           12 months in 2001).

   4       All law enforcement agencies in the UCR
           Program. Crime statistics include estimated
           offense totals for agencies submitting less than
           12 months of offense reports for 2000 and 2001.

   5       All law enforcement agencies in the UCR
           Program. Crime statistics include estimated
           offense totals for agencies submitting less than
           12 months of offense reports.

   6       All law enforcement agencies in the UCR
           Program. Crime statistics include estimated
           offense totals for agencies submitting less than
           12 months of offense statistics for 2001.

   7       All law enforcement agencies in the UCR
           Program. Crime statistics include estimated
           offense totals for agencies submitting less than
           12 months of offense reports for each year.

   8       All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2001.

   9       All university/college law enforcement agencies
           submitting complete reports for 12 months in
           2001.

  10       All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2001.

  11       All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2001.

 12-15     All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for at least 6 common months
           in 2000 and 2001.

 16-19     All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2001.

  20       All law enforcement agencies submitting
           Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR) data in
           2001.

21, 22     All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2001.

23, 24     All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for at least 6 months in 2001.

 25-28     All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for at least 6 months in 2001.

  29       All law enforcement agencies in the UCR
           Program (including those submitting less than
           12 months in 2001).

30, 31     All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2001.

32, 33     All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 1992 and
           2001.

34, 35     All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 1997 and
           2001.

36, 37     All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2000 and
           2001.

 38-43     All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2001.

44, 45     All city law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2000 and
           2001.

 46-49     All city law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2000 and
           2001.

50, 51     All suburban county law enforcement agencies
           submitting complete reports for 12 months in
           2000 and 2001.

 52-55     All suburban county law enforcement agencies
           submitting complete reports for 12 months in
           2001.

56, 57     All rural county law enforcement agencies
           submitting complete reports for 12 months in
           2000 and 2001.

 58-61     All rural county law enforcement agencies
           submitting complete reports for 12 months in
           2001.

62, 63     All suburban area law enforcement agencies
           submitting complete reports for 12 months in
           2000 and 2001.

 64-67     All suburban area law enforcement agencies
           submitting complete reports for 12 months in
           2001.

  68       All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2001.

  69       All law enforcement agencies submitting
           complete reports for 12 months in 2001.

  (1)                                  (3)
 Table                          Table Construction

   1       The 2001 statistics are consistent with Table 2.
           Pre-2001 crime statistics may have been updated
           and, hence, may not be consistent with prior
           publications. Population statistics represent July 1
           provisional estimations for each year except 1990
           and 2000, which are Bureau of the Census
           decennial census data (see the Population section in
           this appendix).

   2       Statistics are aggregated from individual state
           statistics as shown in Table 5. Population statistics
           for 2001 represent estimates based upon the percent
           change in state population from Bureau of the
           Census 2000 decennial census counts and 2001
           provisional estimates (see the Population section in
           this appendix).

   3       Regional offense distributions are computed from
           volume figures as shown in Table 4. Population
           distributions are based on Bureau of the Census
           provisional estimates for 2001.

   4       The 2001 statistics are aggregated from individual
           state statistics as shown in Table 5. Population
           statistics represent Bureau of the Census decennial
           counts for 2000 and provisional estimates for 2001.

   5       Population statistics for 2001 represent estimates
           based upon the percent change in state population
           from Bureau of the Census 2000 decennial census
           counts and 2001 provisional estimates (see the
           Population section in this appendix). Statistics
           under the heading Area Actually Reporting
           represent reported offense totals for agencies
           submitting 12 months of offense reports and
           estimated totals for agencies submitting less than
           12 but more than 2 months of offense reports. The
           statistics under the heading Estimated Totals
           represent the above plus estimated offense totals for
           agencies having less than 3 months of offense
           reports.

   6       Statistics are published for all Metropolitan
           Statistical Areas (MSAs) having at least 75%
           reporting and for which the central city/cities
           submitted 12 months of data in 2001. Population
           statistics for 2001 represent estimates based upon
           the percent change in state population from Bureau
           of the Census 2000 decennial census counts and
           2001 provisional estimates (see the Population
           section in this appendix). The statistics under the
           heading Area Actually Reporting represent reported
           offense totals for agencies submitting all 12 months
           of offense reports plus estimated offense totals for
           agencies submitting less than 12 but more than 2
           months of offense reports. The statistics under the
           heading Estimated Total represent the above plus
           the estimated offense totals for agencies submitting
           less than 3 months of offense reports. The tabular
           breakdowns are according to UCR definitions (see
           App. II).

   7       Offense totals are for all Index offense categories
           other than aggravated assault.

   8       Cities and Towns are defined to be agencies in
           Population Groups I through V (App. III).
           Population statistics for 2001 represent estimates
           based upon the percent change in state population
           from Bureau of the Census 2000 decennial census
           counts and 2001 provisional estimates (see the
           Population section in this appendix).

   9       The 1999 student enrollment figures, which are
           provided by the U.S. Department of Education, are
           the most recent available. They include full- and
           part-time students. No adjustments to equate part-time
           enrollments into full-time equivalents have
           been made.

  10       Suburban Counties are defined as the areas covered
           by noncity agencies within an MSA (App. III).
           Population classifications of suburban counties are
           based on 2001 UCR estimates for individual
           agencies (see the Population section in this
           appendix).

  11       Rural Counties are those outside MSAs and whose
           jurisdictions are not covered by city police agencies
           (App. III). Population classifications of rural
           counties are based on 2001 UCR estimates for
           individual agencies (see the Population section in
           this appendix).

 12-15     The 2001 crime trend statistics are 2-year
           comparisons based on 2001 reported crime activity.
           Only common reported months for individual
           agencies are included in 2001 trend calculations.
           Population statistics for 2001 represent estimates
           based upon the percent change in state population
           from Bureau of the Census 2000 decennial census
           counts and 2001 provisional estimates (see the
           Population section in this appendix). See Appendix
           III for UCR population breakdowns. Note that
           Suburban and Nonsuburban Cities are all municipal
           agencies other than central cities in MSAs.

 16-19     The 2001 crime rates are the ratios of the
           aggregated 2001 crime volumes and the aggregated
           2001 populations of the contributing agencies.
           Population statistics for 2001 represent estimates
           based upon the percent change in state population
           from Bureau of the Census 2000 decennial census
           counts and 2001 provisional estimates (see the
           Population section in this appendix). See Appendix
           III for UCR population breakdowns. Note that
           Suburban and Nonsuburban Cities are all municipal
           agencies other than central cities in MSAs.

  20       The weapon totals are the aggregate for each murder
           victim recorded on the SHRs for calendar year 2001.

21, 22     The weapon totals are aggregated 2001 totals.
           Population statistics represent 2001 UCR estimates.

23, 24     Offense total and value lost total are computed for all
           Index offense categories other than aggravated
           assault. Percent distribution is derived based on
           offense total of each Index offense. Trend statistics
           are derived based on agencies with at least 6 common
           months complete data for 2000 and 2001.

 25-28     The 2001 clearance rates are based on offense and
           clearance volume totals of the contributing agencies
           for 2001. Population statistics for 2001 represent
           estimates based upon the percent change in state
           population from Bureau of the Census 2000 decennial
           census counts and 2001 provisional estimates (see the
           Population section in this appendix). See Appendix
           III for UCR Program population breakdowns.

  29       The arrest totals presented are national estimates
           based on the arrest statistics of all law enforcement
           agencies in the UCR Program (including those
           submitting less than 12 months). The Total Estimated
           Arrests statistic is the sum of estimated arrest volumes
           for each of the 29 offenses. Each individual arrest
           total is the sum of the estimated volumes within each
           of the eight population groups (App. III). Each
           group's estimate is the reported volume (as shown in
           Table 31) divided by the percent of total group
           population reporting (according to 2001 UCR
           estimates for individual agencies, see the Population
           section in this appendix).

30, 31     The 2001 arrest rates are the ratios, per 100,000
           inhabitants, of the aggregated 2001 reported arrest
           statistics and population. The population statistics for
           2001 represent estimates based upon the percent
           change in state population from Bureau of the Census
           2000 decennial census counts and 2001 provisional
           estimates (see the Population section in this
           appendix). See Appendix III for UCR population
           classifications/geographical configuration.

32, 33     The arrest trends are the percentage differences
           between 1992 and 2001 arrest volumes aggregated
           from all common agencies. The population statistics
           for 2001 represent estimates based upon the percent
           change in state population from Bureau of the Census
           2000 decennial census counts and 2001 provisional
           estimates. (See the Population section in this
           appendix). Population statistics for 1992 are based
           upon the percent change in state population from
           Bureau of the Census 1991 and 1992 provisional
           estimates.

34, 35     The arrest trends are the percentage differences
           between 1997 and 2001 arrest volumes aggregated
           from common agencies. The population statistics for
           2001 represent estimates based upon the percent
           change in state population from Bureau of the
           Census 2000 decennial census counts and 2001
           provisional estimates. (See the Population section in
           this appendix). Population statistics for 1997 are
           based upon the percent change in state population
           from the Bureau of the Census 1996 and 1997
           provisional estimates.

36, 37     The arrest trends are 2-year comparisons between
           2000 and 2001 arrest volumes aggregated from
           common agencies. Population statistics represent
           Bureau of the Census 2000 decennial census counts.
           Population statistics for 2001 represent estimates
           based upon the percent change in state population
           from Bureau of the Census 2000 decennial counts
           and 2001 provisional estimates (see the Population
           section in this appendix).

 38-43     Population statistics for 2001 represent estimates
           based upon the percent change in state population
           from Bureau of the Census 2000 decennial census
           counts and 2001 provisional estimates (see the
           Population section in this appendix).

44, 45     The 2001 city arrest trends represent the percentage
           differences between 2000 and 2001 arrest volumes
           aggregated from common city agencies. City
           Agencies are defined to be all agencies within
           Population Groups I-VI (App. III). Population
           statistics for 2001 represent estimates based upon
           the percent change in state population from Bureau
           of the Census 2000 decennial census counts and
           2001 provisional estimates. (See the Population
           section in this appendix.)

 46-49     City Agencies are defined to be all agencies within
           Population Groups I-VI (App. III). Population
           statistics for 2001 represent estimates based upon
           the percent change in state population from Bureau
           of Census 2000 decennial census counts and 2001
           provisional estimates (see Population section in this
           appendix).

50, 51     The 2001 suburban county arrest trends represent
           percentage differences between 2000 and 2001
           volumes aggregated from contributing agencies.
           Suburban Counties are defined as the areas covered
           by noncity agencies within an MSA (App. III).
           Population statistics for 2000 represent Bureau of
           the Census decennial census counts. Population
           statistics for 2001 represent estimates based upon
           the percent change in state population from Bureau
           of the Census 2000 decennial census counts and
           2001 provisional estimates (see the Population
           section in this appendix).

 52-55     Suburban Counties are defined as the areas covered
           by noncity agencies within an MSA (App. III).
           Population statistics for 2001 represent estimates
           based upon the percent change in state population
           from the Bureau of the Census 2000 decennial
           census counts and 2001 provisional estimates (see
           the Population section in this appendix).

56, 57     The 2001 rural county arrest trends represent
           percentage differences between 2000 and 2001
           volumes aggregated from contributing agencies.
           Rural Counties are defined as noncity agencies
           outside MSAs (App. III). Population statistics for
           2000 represent Bureau of the Census decennial
           census counts. Population statistics for 2001
           represent estimates based upon the percent change
           in state population from Bureau of the Census 2000
           decennial census counts and 2001 provisional
           estimates (see the Population section in this
           appendix).

 58-61     Rural Counties are defined as noncity agencies
           outside MSAs (App. III). Population statistics for
           2001 represent estimates based upon the percent
           change in state population from the Bureau of the
           Census 2000 decennial census counts and 2001
           provisional estimates (see the Population section in
           this appendix).

62, 63     The 2001 suburban area arrest trends represent
           percentage differences between 2000 and 2001
           arrest volumes aggregated from contributing
           agencies. Suburban Area is defined as agencies
           that are within a metropolitan area excluding those
           that cover central cities as defined by the Office of
           Management and Budget (App. III). Population
           statistics for 2000 represent Bureau of the Census
           decennial census counts. Population statistics for
           2001 represent estimates based upon the percent
           change in state population from Bureau of the
           Census 2000 decennial census counts and 2001
           provisional estimates (see the Population section in
           this appendix).

 64-67     Suburban Area is defined as agencies that are
           within a metropolitan area excluding those that
           cover central cities as defined by the Office of
           Management and Budget (App. III). Population
           statistics for 2001 represent estimates based upon
           the percent change in state population from Bureau
           of the Census 2000 decennial census counts and
           2001 provisional estimates (see the Population
           section in this appendix).

  68       Population statistics for 2001 represent estimates
           based upon the percent change in state population
           from Bureau of the Census 2000 decennial census
           counts and 2001 provisional estimates (see the
           Population section in this appendix).

  69       Arrest totals are aggregated for individual agencies
           within each state. Population statistics represent
           Bureau of the Census provisional estimates for
           2001 (see Population section in this appendix).

  (1)                                  (4)
 Table                           General Comments

   1       Represents an estimation of national reported crime
           activity from 1982 to 2001.

   2       Represents an estimation of national reported crime
           activity in 2001.

   3       Represents the 2001 geographical distribution of
           estimated Crime Index offenses and population.

   4       Represents an estimation of reported crime activity
           for Index offenses at the:
             1. national level
             2. regional level
             3. division level
             4. state level
           Any comparison of UCR statistics should take into
           consideration demographic factors.

   5       Represents an estimation of reported crime activity
           for Index offenses at the state level. Any comparison
           of UCR statistics should take into consideration
           demographic factors.

   6       Represents an estimation of the reported crime
           activity for Index offenses at individual MSA level.
           Any comparison of UCR statistics should take into
           consideration demographic factors.

   7       Represents an estimation of national reported crime
           activity from 1997 to 2001. Aggravated assault is
           excluded from Table 7, because if money or
           property is taken in connection with an assault, the
           offense is robbery.

   8       Represents reported crime activity of individual
           agencies in cities and towns 10,000 and over in
           population. Any comparison of UCR statistics
           should take into consideration demographic factors.

   9       Represents reported crime from those individual
           university/college law enforcement agencies
           contributing to the UCR Program. These agencies
           are listed alphabetically by state. Any comparison
           of these UCR statistics should take into
           consideration size of enrollment, number of on-campus
           residents, and other demographic factors.

  10       Represents crime reported to individual law
           enforcement agencies in suburban counties, i.e., the
           individual sheriff's office, county police department,
           highway patrol, and/or state police. These figures
           do not represent the county totals since they exclude
           city crime counts. Any comparison of UCR
           statistics should take into consideration demographic
           factors.

  11       Represents crime reported to individual rural county
           law enforcement agencies covering populations
           25,000 and over, i.e., the individual sheriff's office,
           county police department, highway patrol, and/or
           state police. These figures do not represent the
           county totals since they exclude city crime counts.
           Any comparison of UCR statistics should take into
           consideration demographic factors.

 12-15

 16-19     The forcible rape figures furnished by the Delaware
           and Illinois state-level UCR Programs were not in
           accordance with national guidelines. For inclusion
           in these tables, the Delaware and Illinois forcible
           rape figures were estimated by using the national
           rates for each population group applied to the
           population by group for Delaware and Illinois
           agencies supplying all 12 months of data. Slight
           decrease in national coverage for Table 19 due to
           editing procedure and lower submission rate.

  20       The SHR is the monthly report form concerning
           homicides. It details victim and offender
           characteristics, circumstances, weapons used, etc.

21, 22

23, 24     Aggravated assault is excluded from Table 23. For
           UCR Program purposes, the taking of money or
           property in connection with an assault is reported
           as robbery.

 25-28

  29

30, 31

32, 33

34, 35

36, 37

 38-43

44, 45

 46-49

50, 51

 52-55

56, 57

 58-61

62, 63

 64-67

  68       Data furnished are based upon individual state age
           definitions for juveniles.

  69       Any comparison of statistics should take into
           consideration variances in arrest practices,
           particularly for Part II crimes.


Appendix II--Offenses in Uniform Crime Reporting

The Uniform Crime Reporting Program classifies offenses into two groups, Part I and Part II. Each month contributing agencies submit information on the number of Part I (Crime Index) offenses known to law enforcement; those cleared by arrest or exceptional means; and the age, sex, and race of persons arrested. Contributors provide only arrest data for Part II offenses.

The Part I offenses are defined below:

Criminal homicide--a.) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter: the willful Intentional; not accidental; voluntary; designed.

There is no precise definition of the term willful because its meaning largely depends on the context in which it appears.
 (nonnegligent) killing of one human being by another. Deaths caused by negligence negligence, in law, especially tort law, the breach of an obligation (duty) to act with care, or the failure to act as a reasonable and prudent person would under similar circumstances. , attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicides It may never be fully completed or, depending on its its nature, it may be that it can never be completed. However, new and revised entries in the list are always welcome.

See also: List of famous deaths by accidental drug overdose
, and accidental accidental /ac·ci·den·tal/ (ak?si-den´t'l)
1. occurring by chance, unexpectedly, or unintentionally.

2. nonessential; not innate or intrinsic.
 deaths are excluded. The Program classifies justifiable homicides justifiable homicide n. a killing without evil or criminal intent, for which there can be no blame, such as self-defense to protect oneself or to protect another, or the shooting by a law enforcement officer in fulfilling his/her duties.  separately and limits the definition to: (1) the killing of a felon An individual who commits a crime of a serious nature, such as Burglary or murder. A person who commits a felony.


felon n. a person who has been convicted of a felony, which is a crime punishable by death or a term in state or federal prison.
 by a law enforcement officer in the line of duty In the Line of Duty may refer to:
  • In the Line of Duty (film)
  • In the Line of Duty (Stargate SG-1)
; or (2) the killing of a felon, during the commission of a felony felony (fĕl`ənē), any grave crime, in contrast to a misdemeanor, that is so declared in statute or was so considered in common law. , by a private citizen. b.) Manslaughter by negligence: the killing of another person through gross negligence An indifference to, and a blatant violation of, a legal duty with respect to the rights of others.

Gross negligence is a conscious and voluntary disregard of the need to use reasonable care, which is likely to cause foreseeable grave injury or harm to persons, property, or
. Traffic fatalities are excluded. While manslaughter by negligence is a Part I crime, it is not included in the Crime Index.

Forcible rape--The carnal knowledge Copulation; the act of a man having sexual relations with a woman.

Penetration is an essential element of sexual intercourse, and there is carnal knowledge if even the slightest penetration of the female by the male organ takes place.
 of a female forcibly forc·i·ble  
adj.
1. Effected against resistance through the use of force: The police used forcible restraint in order to subdue the assailant.

2. Characterized by force; powerful.
 and against her will. Rapes by force and attempts or assaults to rape regardless of the age of the victim are included. Statutory offenses (no force used--victim under age of consent) are excluded.

Robbery--The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody The care, possession, and control of a thing or person. The retention, inspection, guarding, maintenance, or security of a thing within the immediate care and control of the person to whom it is committed. The detention of a person by lawful authority or process. , or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.

Aggravated ag·gra·vate  
tr.v. ag·gra·vat·ed, ag·gra·vat·ing, ag·gra·vates
1. To make worse or more troublesome.

2. To rouse to exasperation or anger; provoke. See Synonyms at annoy.
 assault--An unlawful Contrary to or unauthorized by law; illegal.

When applied to promises, agreements, or contracts, the term denotes that such agreements have no legal effect. The law disapproves of such conduct because it is immoral or contrary to public policy.
 attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied ac·com·pa·ny  
v. ac·com·pa·nied, ac·com·pa·ny·ing, ac·com·pa·nies

v.tr.
1. To be or go with as a companion.

2.
 by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm The medical idea of (grievous) bodily harm is more specific than legal ideas of assault or violence in general, and distinct from property damage.

It refers to lasting harm done to the body, human or otherwise, although in its legal sense it is exclusively defined as lasting
. Simple assaults are excluded.

Burglary (breaking or entering)--The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. Attempted forcible entry forcible entry n. the crime of taking possession of a house or other structure, or land by the use of physical force or serious threats against the occupants.  is included.

Larceny-theft (except motor vehicle theft)--The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession constructive possession n. when a person does not have actual possession, but has the power to control an asset, he/she has constructive possession. Having the key to a safe deposit box, for example, gives one constructive possession. (See: constructive)  of another. Examples are thefts of bicycles or automobile automobile, self-propelled vehicle used for travel on land. The term is commonly applied to a four-wheeled vehicle designed to carry two to six passengers and a limited amount of cargo, as contrasted with a truck, which is designed primarily for the transportation of  accessories, shoplifting Ask a Lawyer

Question
Country: United States of America
State: Florida

caught shoplifting at sears 12/05/05, first time, 20yearsold, have no criminal record.
, pocket-picking, or the stealing STEALING. This term imports, ex vi termini, nearly the same as larceny; but in common parlance, it does not always import a felony; as, for example, you stole an acre of my land.
     2.
 of any property or article which is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. Attempted larcenies are included. Embezzlement embezzlement, wrongful use, for one's own selfish ends, of the property of another when that property has been legally entrusted to one. Such an act was not larceny at common law because larceny was committed only when property was acquired by a "felonious taking," i. , confidence games, forgery forgery, in art
forgery, in art, the false claim to authenticity for a work of art. The Nature of Forgery


Because the provenance of works of art is seldom clear and because their origin is often judged by means of subtle factors, art
, worthless checks, etc., are excluded.

Motor vehicle theft--The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. A motor vehicle is self-propelled self-pro·pelled
adj.
1. Containing its own means of propulsion: a self-propelled golf cart.

2. Fired from or mounted on a moving vehicle: a self-propelled howitzer.
 and runs on the surface and not on rails. Motorboats, construction equipment, airplanes, and farming equipment are specifically excluded from this category.

Arson--Any willful or malicious Involving malice; characterized by wicked or mischievous motives or intentions.

An act done maliciously is one that is wrongful and performed willfully or intentionally, and without legal justification.


DESERTION, MALICIOUS.
 burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud To make a Misrepresentation of an existing material fact, knowing it to be false or making it recklessly without regard to whether it is true or false, intending for someone to rely on the misrepresentation and under circumstances in which such person does rely on it to his or , a dwelling dwelling

an abnormality of gait in a horse in which there is a momentary hesitation before the foot is placed on the ground.
 house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.

The Part II offenses are defined below:

Other assaults (simple)--Assaults and attempted assaults where no weapons are used and which do not result in serious or aggravated injury to the victim.

Forgery and counterfeiting--Making, altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, anything false in the semblance of that which is true. Attempts are included.

Fraud--Fraudulent conversion and obtaining money or property by false pretenses False representations of material past or present facts, known by the wrongdoer to be false, and made with the intent to defraud a victim into passing title in property to the wrongdoer. . Confidence games and bad checks, except forgeries and counterfeiting counterfeiting, manufacturing spurious coins, paper money, or evidences of governmental obligation (e.g., bonds) in the semblance of the true. There must be sufficient resemblance to the genuine article to deceive a person using ordinary caution. , are included.

Embezzlement--Misappropriation or misapplication misapplication,
n the use of incorrect or improper procedures while administering treatment; results from inadequacy in experience, training, skills, or knowledge. May also result from impairment or incompetence.
 of money or property entrusted to one's care, custody, or control.

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing--Buying, receiving, and possessing stolen property, including attempts.

Vandalism--Willful or malicious destruction, injury, disfigurement dis·fig·ure  
tr.v. dis·fig·ured, dis·fig·ur·ing, dis·fig·ures
To mar or spoil the appearance or shape of; deform.



[Middle English disfiguren, from Old French desfigurer
, or defacement de·face  
tr.v. de·faced, de·fac·ing, de·fac·es
1. To mar or spoil the appearance or surface of; disfigure.

2. To impair the usefulness, value, or influence of.

3.
 of any public or private property, real or personal, without consent of the owner or persons having custody or control. Attempts are included.

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.--All violations of regulations or statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing, furnishing, and manufacturing of deadly weapons deadly weapon n. any weapon which can kill. This includes not only weapons which are intended to do harm like a gun or knife, but also blunt instruments like clubs, baseball bats, monkey wrenches, an automobile or any object which actually causes death.  or silencers. Attempts are included.

Prostitution prostitution, act of granting sexual access for payment. Although most commonly conducted by females for males, it may be performed by females or males for either females or males.  and commercialized vice--Sex offenses of a commercialized nature, such as prostitution, keeping a bawdy bawd·y  
adj. bawd·i·er, bawd·i·est
1. Humorously coarse; risqué.

2. Vulgar; lewd.



bawdi·ly adv.
 house, procuring Procuring, in general, is the act of acquiring goods or services, usually by contract. It may refer to:
  • Procurement, a business process to acquire goods or services.
  • Procuring, the act of aiding a prostitute in the arrangement of a sex act with a customer.
, or transporting women for immoral purposes. Attempts are included.

Sex offenses A class of sexual conduct prohibited by the law.

Since the 1970s this area of the law has undergone significant changes and reforms. Although the commission of sex offenses is not new, public awareness and concern regarding sex offenses have grown, resulting in the
 (except forcible rape, prostitution, and commercialized vice)--Statutory rape and offenses against chastity Chastity
See also Modesty, Purity, Virginity.

Agnes, St.

virgin saint and martyr. [Christian Hagiog.: Brewster, 76]

Artemis

(Rom. Diana) moon goddess; virgin huntress. [Gk. Myth.
, common decency de·cen·cy  
n. pl. de·cen·cies
1. The state or quality of being decent; propriety.

2. Conformity to prevailing standards of propriety or modesty.

3. decencies
a.
, morals, and the like. Attempts are included.

Drug abuse violations--State and/or local offenses relating to relating to relate prepconcernant

relating to relate prepbezüglich +gen, mit Bezug auf +acc 
 the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, and manufacturing of narcotic narcotic, any of a number of substances that have a depressant effect on the nervous system. The chief narcotic drugs are opium, its constituents morphine and codeine, and the morphine derivative heroin.

See also drug addiction and drug abuse.
 drugs. The following drug categories are specified spec·i·fy  
tr.v. spec·i·fied, spec·i·fy·ing, spec·i·fies
1. To state explicitly or in detail: specified the amount needed.

2. To include in a specification.

3.
: opium opium, substance derived by collecting and drying the milky juice in the unripe seed pods of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. Opium varies in color from yellow to dark brown and has a characteristic odor and a bitter taste.  or cocaine cocaine (kōkān`, kō`kān), alkaloid drug derived from the leaves of the coca shrub. A commonly abused illegal drug, cocaine has limited medical uses, most often in surgical applications that take advantage of the fact that, in  and their derivatives derivatives

In finance, contracts whose value is derived from another asset, which can include stocks, bonds, currencies, interest rates, commodities, and related indexes. Purchasers of derivatives are essentially wagering on the future performance of that asset.
 (morphine morphine, principal derivative of opium, which is the juice in the unripe seed pods of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. It was first isolated from opium in 1803 by the German pharmacist F. W. A. , heroin heroin (hĕ`rəwən), opiate drug synthesized from morphine (see narcotic). Originally produced in 1874, it was thought to be not only nonaddictive but useful as a cure for respiratory illness and morphine addiction, and capable of relieving , codeine codeine (kō`dēn), alkaloid found in opium. It is a narcotic whose effects, though less potent, resemble those of morphine. An effective cough suppressant, it is mainly used in cough medicines. Like other narcotics, codeine is addictive. ); marijuana marijuana or marihuana, drug obtained from the flowering tops, stems, and leaves of the hemp plant, Cannabis sativa (see hemp) or C. indica; the latter species can withstand colder climates. ; synthetic Synthetic

A financial instrument that is created artificially by simulating another instrument with the combined features of a collection of other assets.

Notes:
 narcotics--manufactured narcotics narcotics n. 1) techinically, drugs which dull the senses. 2) a popular generic term for drugs which cannot be legally possessed, sold, or transported except for medicinal uses for which a physician or dentist's prescription is required.  that can cause true addiction addiction: see drug addiction and drug abuse.  (demerol Demerol: see analgesic. , methadone methadone (mĕth`ədōn', –dŏn'), synthetic narcotic similar in effect to morphine. Synthesized in Germany, it came into clinical use after World War II. It is sometimes used as an analgesic and to suppress the cough reflex. ); and dangerous nonnarcotic drugs (barbiturates Barbiturates Definition

Barbiturates are medicines that act on the central nervous system and cause drowsiness and can control seizures.
Purpose
, benzedrine benzedrine

see amphetamine.

benzedrine Amphetamine sulfate Pharmacology A vasoconstricting nonnarcotic stimulant, first marketed as an OTC inhalation stimulant to treat congestion. See Amphetamine.
).

Gambling--Promoting, permitting, or engaging in illegal gambling gambling or gaming, betting of money or valuables on, and often participation in, games of chance (some involving degrees of skill). In England and in the United States, gambling was not a common-law crime if conducted privately. .

Offenses against the family and children--Nonsupport, neglect An omission to do or perform some work, duty, or act.

As used by U.S. courts, the term neglect denotes the failure of responsibility on the part of defendants or attorneys.
, desertion, or abuse of family and children. Attempts are included.

Driving under the influence--Driving or operating any vehicle or common carrier while drunk or under the influence of liquor liquor /li·quor/ (lik´er) (li´kwor) pl. liquors, liquo´res   [L.]
1. a liquid, especially an aqueous solution containing a medicinal substance.

2.
 or narcotics.

Liquor laws--State and/or local liquor law violations except drunkenness Drunkenness
See also Alcoholism.

Acrasia

self-indulgent in the pleasures of the senses. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]

Admiral of the red

a wine-bibber. [Br.
 and driving under the influence. Federal violations are excluded.

Drunkenness--Offenses relating to drunkenness or intoxication intoxication, condition of body tissue affected by a poisonous substance. Poisonous materials, or toxins, are to be found in heavy metals such as lead and mercury, in drugs, in chemicals such as alcohol and carbon tetrachloride, in gases such as carbon monoxide, and . Driving under the influence is excluded.

Disorderly conduct--Breach of the peace.

Vagrancy--Begging, loitering Loitering (IPA pronunciation: ['lɔɪtəˌrɪŋ] is an intransitive verb meaning to stand idly, to stop numerous times, or to delay and procrastinate. , etc. Includes prosecutions under the charge of suspicious suspicious adjective Referring to the consideration of a particular disorder–eg, cancer, as a diagnostic possibility, as in 'suspicious for malignancy'  person.

All other offenses--All violations of state and/or local laws except those listed above and traffic offenses.

Suspicion--No specific offense; suspect released without formal charges being placed.

Curfew curfew [O.Fr.,=cover fire], originally a signal, such as the ringing of a bell, to damp the fire, extinguish all lights in the dwelling, and retire for the night. The custom originated as a precaution against fires and was common throughout Europe in the Middle Ages.  and loitering laws (persons under age 18)--Offenses relating to violations of local curfew or loitering ordinances where such laws exist.

Runaways (persons under age 18)--Limited to juveniles taken into protective custody An arrangement whereby a person is safeguarded by law enforcement authorities in a location other than the person's home because his or her safety is seriously threatened.  under provisions of local statutes.

Appendix III--Uniform Crime Reporting Area Definitions

The presentation of statistics by reporting area facilitates analyzing local crime counts in conjunction conjunction, in astronomy
conjunction, in astronomy, alignment of two celestial bodies as seen from the earth. Conjunction of the moon and the planets is often determined by reference to the sun.
 with those for areas of similar geographical ge·o·graph·ic   also ge·o·graph·i·cal
adj.
1. Of or relating to geography.

2. Concerning the topography of a specific region.



ge
 location or population size. Geographically ge·o·graph·ic   also ge·o·graph·i·cal
adj.
1. Of or relating to geography.

2. Concerning the topography of a specific region.



ge
, the United States is divisible DIVISIBLE. The susceptibility of being divided.
     2. A contract cannot, in general, be divided in such a manner that an action may be brought, or a right accrue, on a part of it. 2 Penna. R. 454.
 by regions, divisions, and states. Further breakdowns rely on population figures and proximity PROXIMITY. Kindred between two persons. Dig. 38, 16, 8.  to metropolitan areas. As a general rule, sheriffs, county police, and state police report crimes committed within the limits of counties but outside cities, and local police report crimes committed within the city limits.

Community Types

Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) data are often presented in aggregations representing three types of communities:

1. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs)--Each MSA (Metropolitan Service Area) An urban area with at least 50,000 people plus surrounding counties. There are 306 MSAs and 428 RSAs (rural service areas) in the U.S. MSAs and RSAs are used to allocate cellular licenses.  includes a central city of at least 50,000 people or an urbanized area of at least 50,000. The county containing the central city and other contiguous Adjacent or touching. Contrast with fragmentation. See contiguous file.  counties having strong economic and social ties to the central city and county are also included. Counties in an MSA are designated suburban for UCR purposes. An MSA may cross state lines. The MSA concept facilitates the analysis and presentation of uniform statistical data on metropolitan areas by establishing reporting units which represent major population centers. Due to changes in the geographic composition of MSAs, no year-to-year comparisons of data for those areas should be attempted.

New England New England, name applied to the region comprising six states of the NE United States—Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. The region is thought to have been so named by Capt.  MSAs are composed of cities and towns instead of counties. In this publication's tabular presentations, New England cities and towns are assigned to the proper MSAs. Some counties, however, have both suburban and rural portions. Data for state police and sheriffs in those jurisdictions are included in statistics for the rural areas.

MSAs made up approximately ap·prox·i·mate  
adj.
1. Almost exact or correct: the approximate time of the accident.

2.
 79.9 percent of the total United States population in 2001. Some presentations in this book refer to suburban areas. A suburban area includes cities with less than 50,000 inhabitants
:This article is about the video game. For Inhabitants of housing, see Residency
Inhabitants is an independently developed commercial puzzle game created by S+F Software. Details
The game is based loosely on the concepts from SameGame.
 in addition to counties (unincorporated areas In law, an unincorporated area is a region of land that is not a part of any municipality. To "incorporate" in this context means to form a municipal corporation, i.e., a city or town with its own government. ) within the MSA. The central cities are, of course, excluded. The concept of suburban area is especially important because of the particular crime conditions which exist in the communities surrounding sur·round  
tr.v. sur·round·ed, sur·round·ing, sur·rounds
1. To extend on all sides of simultaneously; encircle.

2. To enclose or confine on all sides so as to bar escape or outside communication.

n.
 the Nation's largest cities.

2. Cities Outside MSAs--Cities outside MSAs are mostly incorporated. They comprised 8.0 percent of the 2001 population of the United States.

3. Rural Counties Outside MSAs--Rural counties are composed of mostly unincorporated areas. Law enforcement agencies in rural counties cover areas that are not under the jurisdiction of city police departments. Rural county law enforcement agencies served 12.1 percent of the national population in 2001.

The following is an illustration of the community types:
                          MSA             NON-MSA

                        CENTRAL
                     CITIES 50,000        CITIES
     CITIES            AND OVER           OUTSIDE
                                        METROPLITAN
                       SUBURBAN            AREAS
                        CITIES

    COUNTIES
   (including          SUBURBAN            RURAL
 unincorporated        COUNTIES          COUNTIES
     areas)


Population Groups

The population group classifications used by the UCR Program are:
Population               Political           Population
  Group                    Label                Range

I                          City            250,000 and over
II                         City            100,000 to 249,999
III                        City            50,000 to 99,999
IV                         City            25,000 to 49,999
V                          City            10,000 to 24,999
VI                         City (1)        Less than 10,000
VIII (Rural County)        County (2)      N/A
IX (Suburban County)       County (2)      N/A

(1) Includes universities and colleges to which no population is
attributed.

(2) Includes state police to which no population is attributed.


The major source of UCR data is the individual law enforcement agency. The number of agencies included in each population group will vary slightly from year to year because of population growth, geopolitical consolidation, municipal incorporation, etc. Population figures for individual jurisdictions are estimated by the UCR Program in noncensus years. (See Appendix I for a more comprehensive explanation of population estimations.)

The following table shows the number of UCR contributing agencies within each population group for 2001.
Population                  Number of      Population
  Group                      Agencies       Covered

I                                70        52,194,574
II                              170        25,241,834
III                             415        28,433,360
IV                              794        27,588,722
V                             1,856        29,412,579
VI (1)                        8,463        25,860,112
VIII (Rural County) (2)       3,413        34,454,583
IX (Suburban County) (2)      1,790        61,611,123
Total                        16,971       284,796,887

(1) Includes universities and colleges to which no population is
attributed.

(2) Includes state police to which no population is attributed.


Regions and Divisions

As shown in the accompanying ac·com·pa·ny  
v. ac·com·pa·nied, ac·com·pa·ny·ing, ac·com·pa·nies

v.tr.
1. To be or go with as a companion.

2.
 map, the United States is composed of four regions: the Northeastern north·east  
n.
1. Abbr. NE The direction or point on the mariner's compass halfway between due north and due east, or 45° east of due north.

2. An area or region lying in the northeast.

3.
 States, the Midwestern Mid·west   or Middle West

A region of the north-central United States around the Great Lakes and the upper Mississippi Valley. It is generally considered to include Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, and
 States, the Southern States Southern States
U.S.

Confederacy

government of 11 Southern states that left the Union in 1860. [Am. Hist.: EB, III: 73]

Dixie

popular name for Southern states in U.S. and for song. [Am. Hist.
, and the Western States. These regions are further separated into nine divisions. The following table delineates the regional, divisional, and state configuration of the country.
NORTHEASTERN STATES

New England               Middle Atlantic
  Connecticut               New Jersey
  Maine                     New York
  Massachusetts             Pennsylvania
  New Hampshire
  Rhode Island
  Vermont

MIDWESTERN STATES

East North Central        West North Central
  Illinois                  Iowa
  Indiana                   Kansas
  Michigan                  Minnesota
  Ohio                      Missouri
  Wisconsin                 Nebraska
                            North Dakota
                            South Dakota

SOUTHERN STATES

South Atlantic            East South Central
  Delaware                  Alabama
  District of Columbia      Kentucky
  Florida                   Mississippi
  Georgia                   Tennessee
  Maryland                West South Central
  North Carolina            Arkansas
  South Carolina            Louisiana
  Virginia                  Oklahoma
  West Virginia             Texas

WESTERN STATES

Mountain                  Pacific
  Arizona                   Alaska
  Colorado                  California
  Idaho                     Hawaii
  Montana                   Oregon
  Nevada                    Washington
  New Mexico
  Utah
  Wyoming


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Appendix IV--The Nation's Two Crime Measures

The U.S. Department of Justice administers two statistical programs to measure the magnitude magnitude, in astronomy, measure of the brightness of a star or other celestial object. The stars cataloged by Ptolemy (2d cent. A.D.), all visible with the unaided eye, were ranked on a brightness scale such that the brightest stars were of 1st magnitude and the , nature, and impact of crime in the Nation: the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program and the National Crime Victimization Survey The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), administered by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, is a national survey of approximately 77,200 [1] households in the United States, on the frequency of crime victimization, as well as chacteristics and consequences  (NCVS NCVS National Center for Voice and Speech (Denver, CO)
NCVS National Crime Victimization Survey
NCVS National Crime Victimization Study
NCVS National Crime Victims Survey
NCVS Northwest Credentials Verification Service
). Each of these programs produces valuable information about aspects of the Nation's crime problem. Because the UCR and NCVS programs are conducted for different purposes, use different methods, and focus on somewhat different aspects of crime, the information they produce together provides a more comprehensive panorama panorama

Narrative scene or landscape painted to conform to a curved or flat background, which surrounds or is unrolled before the viewer. Popular in the late 18th and 19th centuries, it was an antecedent of the stereopticon and motion pictures.
 of the Nation's crime problem than either could produce alone.

Uniform Crime Reports

The FBI's UCR Program, which began in 1929, collects information on the following crimes reported to law enforcement authorities: homicide, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Arrests are reported for 21 additional crime categories.

The UCR data are compiled from monthly law enforcement reports or individual crime incident records transmitted directly to the FBI or to centralized cen·tral·ize  
v. cen·tral·ized, cen·tral·iz·ing, cen·tral·iz·es

v.tr.
1. To draw into or toward a center; consolidate.

2.
 state agencies that then report to the FBI. Each report submitted to the UCR Program is examined thoroughly for reasonableness, accuracy, and deviations that may indicate errors. Large variations in crime levels may indicate modified records procedures, incomplete reporting, or changes in a jurisdiction's boundaries Natural or artificial separations or divisions between adjoining properties that show their limits.

Boundaries are used to establish private and public ownership by determining the exact location of the points at which one piece of land is distinguishable from another.
. To identify any unusual fluctuations in an agency's crime counts, monthly reports are compared with previous submissions of the agency and with those for similar agencies.

In 2001, law enforcement agencies active in the UCR Program represented approximately 255 million United States inhabitants--89.6 percent of the total population.

The UCR Program provides crime counts for the Nation as a whole, as well as for regions, states, counties, cities, and towns. This permits studies among neighboring neigh·bor  
n.
1. One who lives near or next to another.

2. A person, place, or thing adjacent to or located near another.

3. A fellow human.

4. Used as a form of familiar address.

v.
 jurisdictions and among those with similar populations and other common characteristics.

UCR findings for each calendar year are published in a preliminary release in the spring of the following calendar year, then succeeded by a detailed annual report, Crime in the United States, issued in the fall. In addition to crime counts and trends, this report includes data on crimes cleared, persons arrested (age, sex, and race), law enforcement personnel (including the number of sworn officers killed or assaulted), and the characteristics of homicides (including age, sex, and race of victims and offenders; victim-offender relationships; weapons used; and circumstances surrounding the homicides). Other periodic reports are also available from the UCR Program.

The UCR Program is continually con·tin·u·al  
adj.
1. Recurring regularly or frequently: the continual need to pay the mortgage.

2.
 converting to the more comprehensive and detailed National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS). NIBRS can provide detailed information about each criminal incident in 22 broad categories of offenses.

National Crime Victimization Survey

The Bureau of Justice Statistics' NCVS, which began in 1973, provides a detailed picture of crime incidents, victims, and trends. After a substantial period of research, the survey completed an intensive methodological redesign re·de·sign  
tr.v. re·de·signed, re·de·sign·ing, re·de·signs
To make a revision in the appearance or function of.



re
 in 1993. The redesign was undertaken to improve the questions used to uncover crime, update the survey methods, and broaden the scope of crimes measured. The redesigned survey collects detailed information on the frequency and nature of the crimes of rape, sexual assault, personal robbery, aggravated and simple assault, household burglary, theft, and motor vehicle theft. It does not measure homicide or commercial crimes (such as burglaries of stores).

Two times a year, U.S. Bureau of the Census personnel interview all household members at least 12 years old in a nationally representative sample of approximately 49,000 households (about 80,000 people). Approximately 160,000 interviews are conducted annually. Households stay in the sample for 3 years. New households rotate into the sample on an ongoing basis.

The NCVS collects information on crimes suffered by individuals and households, whether or not those crimes were reported to law enforcement. It estimates the proportion of each crime type reported to law enforcement, and it summarizes the reasons that victims give for reporting or not reporting.

The survey provides information about victims (age, sex, race, ethnicity ethnicity Vox populi Racial status–ie, African American, Asian, Caucasian, Hispanic , marital status marital status,
n the legal standing of a person in regard to his or her marriage state.
, income, and educational level), offenders (sex, race, approximate ap·prox·i·mate
v.
To bring together, as cut edges of tissue.

adj.
1. Relating to the contact surfaces, either proximal or distal, of two adjacent teeth; proximate.

2. Close together.
 age, and victim-offender relationship), and the crimes (time and place of occurrence, use of weapons, nature of injury, and economic consequences). Questions also cover the experiences of victims with the criminal justice system, self-protective self-pro·tec·tive
adj.
Serving or designed to protect oneself.



self-pro·tec
 measures used by victims, and possible substance abuse by offenders. Supplements are added periodically to the survey to obtain detailed information on topics like school crime.

The first data from the redesigned NCVS were published in a BJS Noun 1. BJS - the agency in the Department of Justice that is the primary source of criminal justice statistics for federal and local policy makers
Bureau of Justice Statistics
 bulletin in June June: see month.  1995. BJS publication of NCVS data includes Criminal Victimization victimization Social medicine The abuse of the disenfranchised–eg, those underage, elderly, ♀, mentally retarded, illegal aliens, or other, by coercing them into illegal activities–eg, drug trade, pornography, prostitution.  in the United States, an annual report that covers the broad range of detailed information collected by the NCVS. BJS publishes detailed reports on topics such as crime against women, urban crime, and gun use in crime. The NCVS data files are archived at the National Archive A national archive is a central archive maintained by a nation. List of national archives
  • National Archives of India
  • Archives nationales (France)
  • Archives New Zealand
  • Arquivo Nacional da Torre do Tombo, Portugal
  • Archivo General de Indias, Spain
 of Criminal Justice Data at the University of Michigan (body, education) University of Michigan - A large cosmopolitan university in the Midwest USA. Over 50000 students are enrolled at the University of Michigan's three campuses. The students come from 50 states and over 100 foreign countries.  to enable researchers to perform independent analyses.

Comparing UCR and NCVS

Because the NCVS was designed to complement the UCR Program, the two programs share many similarities. As much as their different collection methods permit, the two measure the same subset A group of commands or functions that do not include all the capabilities of the original specification. Software or hardware components designed for the subset will also work with the original.  of serious crimes, defined alike. Both programs cover rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, theft, and motor vehicle theft. Rape, robbery, theft, and motor vehicle theft are defined virtually identically by both the UCR and NCVS. (While rape is defined analogously a·nal·o·gous  
adj.
1. Similar or alike in such a way as to permit the drawing of an analogy.

2. Biology Similar in function but not in structure and evolutionary origin.
, the UCR Crime Index measures the crime against women only, and the NCVS measures it against both sexes.)

There are also significant differences between the two programs. First, the two programs were created to serve different purposes. The UCR Program's primary objective is to provide a reliable set of criminal justice statistics for law enforcement administration, operation, and management. The NCVS was established to provide previously unavailable information about crime (including crime not reported to police), victims, and offenders.

Second, the two programs measure an overlapping but nonidentical non·i·den·ti·cal
adj.
1. Not being the same; different.

2. Fraternal, as of twins.
 set of crimes. The NCVS includes crimes both reported and not reported to law enforcement. The NCVS excludes, but the UCR includes, homicide, arson, commercial crimes, and crimes against children under age 12. The UCR captures crimes reported to law enforcement, but it excludes simple assaults and sexual assaults other than forcible rape from the Crime Index.

Third, because of methodology, the NCVS and UCR definitions of some crimes differ. For example, the UCR defines burglary as the unlawful entry or attempted entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft. The NCVS, not wanting to ask victims to ascertain offender motives, defines burglary as the entry or attempted entry of a residence by a person who had no right to be there.

Fourth, for property crimes (burglary, theft, and motor vehicle theft), the two programs calculate crime rates using different bases. The UCR rates for these crimes are per capita [Latin, By the heads or polls.] A term used in the Descent and Distribution of the estate of one who dies without a will. It means to share and share alike according to the number of individuals.  (number of crimes per 100,000 persons), whereas the NCVS rates for these crimes are per household (number of crimes per 1,000 households). Because the number of households may not grow at the same rate each year as the total population, trend data for rates of property crimes measured by the two programs may not be comparable.

In addition, some differences in the data from the two programs may result from sampling variation in the NCVS and from estimating for nonresponse in the UCR. The NCVS estimates are derived de·rive  
v. de·rived, de·riv·ing, de·rives

v.tr.
1. To obtain or receive from a source.

2.
 from interviewing a sample and are, therefore, subject to a margin of error. Rigorous statistical methods are used to calculate confidence intervals confidence interval,
n a statistical device used to determine the range within which an acceptable datum would fall. Confidence intervals are usually expressed in percentages, typically 95% or 99%.
 around all survey estimates. Trend data in NCVS reports are described as genuine only if there is at least a 90-percent certainty CERTAINTY, UNCERTAINTY, contracts. In matters of obligation, a thing is certain, when its essence, quality, and quantity, are described, distinctly set forth, Dig. 12, 1, 6. It is uncertain, when the description is not that of one individual object, but designates only the kind. Louis.  that the measured changes are not the result of sampling variation. The UCR data are based on the actual counts of offenses reported by law enforcement jurisdictions. In some circumstances, UCR data are estimated for nonparticipating nonparticipating

1. Of, relating to, or being a class of preferred stock that does not have the right to participate with common stock in earnings growth through increases in dividends. Nearly all preferred stock issues are nonparticipating.
 jurisdictions or those reporting partial data.

Apparent discrepancies between statistics from the two programs can usually be accounted for by their definitional and procedural differences or resolved by comparing NCVS sampling variations (confidence intervals) of those crimes said to have been reported to police with UCR statistics.

For most types of crimes measured by both the UCR and NCVS, analysts familiar with the programs can exclude from analysis those aspects of crime not common to both. Resulting long-term Long-term

Three or more years. In the context of accounting, more than 1 year.


long-term

1. Of or relating to a gain or loss in the value of a security that has been held over a specific length of time. Compare short-term.
 trend lines can be brought into close concordance concordance /con·cor·dance/ (-kord´ins) in genetics, the occurrence of a given trait in both members of a twin pair.concor´dant

con·cor·dance
n.
. The impact of such adjustments is most striking for robbery, burglary, and motor vehicle theft, whose definitions most closely coincide.

With robbery, annual victimization rates are based only on NCVS robberies reported to the police. It is also possible to remove UCR robberies of commercial establishments such as gas stations, convenience stores The following is a list of convenience stores organized by geographical location. Stores are grouped by the lowest heading that contains all locales in which the brands have significant presence. , and banks from analysis. When the resulting NCVS police-reported robbery rates are compared to UCR noncommercial adj. 1. not connected with or engaged in commercial enterprises. Opposite of commercial nt>.

Adj. 1. noncommercial - not connected with or engaged in commercial enterprises
 robbery rates, the results reveal closely corresponding long-term trends.

Each program has unique strengths. The UCR provides a measure of the number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies throughout the country. The UCR's Supplementary Homicide Reports provide the most reliable, timely data on the extent and nature of homicides in the Nation. The NCVS is the primary source of information on the characteristics of criminal victimization and on the number and types of crimes not reported to law enforcement authorities.

By understanding the strengths and limitations of each program, it is possible to use the UCR and NCVS to achieve a greater understanding of crime trends and the nature of crime in the United States. For example, changes in police procedures, shifting attitudes towards crime and police, and other societal so·ci·e·tal  
adj.
Of or relating to the structure, organization, or functioning of society.



so·cie·tal·ly adv.

Adj.
 changes can affect the extent to which people report and law enforcement agencies record crime. NCVS and UCR data can be used in concert to explore why trends in reported and police-recorded crime may differ.
Appendix V--Directory of State Uniform Crime Reporting Programs

Alabama                    Alabama Criminal Justice
                             Information Center
                           Suite 350
                           770 Washington Avenue
                           Montgomery, Alabama 36104
                           334-242-4900

Alaska                     Uniform Crime Reporting Section
                           Department of Public Safety
                             Information System
                           5700 East Tudor Road
                           Anchorage, Alaska 99507
                           907-451-5166

American Samoa             Department of Public Safety
                           Post Office Box 1086
                           Pago Pago
                           American Samoa 96799
                           684-633-1111

Arizona                    Uniform Crime Reporting Program
                           Access Integrity Unit
                           Arizona Department of Public Safety
                           Post Office Box 6638
                           Phoenix, Arizona 85005-6638
                           602-223-2263

Arkansas                   Arkansas Crime Information Center
                           One Capitol Mall, 4D-200
                           Little Rock, Arkansas 72201
                           501-682-2222

California                 Criminal Justice Statistics Center
                           Department of Justice
                           Post Office Box 903427
                           Sacramento, California 94203-4270
                           916-227-3282

Colorado                   Uniform Crime Reporting
                           Colorado Bureau of Investigation
                           Suite 3000
                           690 Kipling Street
                           Denver, Colorado 80215
                           303-239-4300

Connecticut                Uniform Crime Reporting Program
                           Post Office Box 2794
                           Middletown, Connecticut 06457-9294
                           860-685-8030

Delaware                   Delaware State Bureau of Identification
                           Post Office Box 430
                           Dover, Delaw are 19903
                           302-739-5875

District of Columbia       Research and Development
                           Metropolitan Police Department
                           Post Office Box 1606
                           Washington, D.C. 20001
                           202-727-4289

Florida                    Florida Crime Information Bureau
                           Florida Department of Law Enforcement
                           Post Office Box 1489
                           Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489
                           850-410-7121

Georgia                    Georgia Crime Information Center
                           Georgia Bureau of Investigation
                           Post Office Box 370748
                           Decatur, Georgia 30037-0748
                           404-244-2840

Guam                       Guam Police Department
                           Planning, Research and Development
                           Building #3
                           Central Avenue
                           Tiyan, Guam 96913
                           671-472-8911 X 418

Hawaii                     Crime Prevention and Justice
                             Assistance Division
                           Department of the Attorney General
                           Suite 401
                           235 South Beretania Street
                           Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
                           808-586-1416

Idaho                      Criminal Identification Bureau
                           Idaho Department of Law Enforcement
                           Post Office Box 700
                           Meridian, Idaho 83680
                           208-884-7156

Illinois                   Uniform Crime Reporting
                           Division of Administration; Crime
                             Statistics
                           Illinois State Police
                           Post Office Box 3677
                           Springfield, Illinois 62708
                           217-782-5794

Iowa                       Iowa Department of Public Safety
                           Wallace State Office Building
                           East Ninth and Grand
                           Des Moines, Iowa 50319
                           515-281-8494

Kansas                     Criminal Justice System
                           Kansas Bureau of Investigation
                           Crime Data Information Center
                           1620 Southwest Tyler Street
                           Topeka, Kansas 66612
                           785-296-8200

Kentucky                   Records Section
                           Kentucky State Police
                           1250 Louisville Road
                           Frankfort, Kentucky 40601
                           502-227-8790

Louisiana                  Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement
                           Office of the Governor
                           Room 708
                           1885 Wooddale Boulevard
                           Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806
                           225-925-4420

Maine                      Records Management Services
                           Uniform Crime Reporting Division
                           Maine Department of Public Safety
                           Maine State Police
                           36 Hospital Street, Station 42
                           Augusta, Maine 04333
                           207-624-7003

Maryland                   Central Records Division
                           Maryland State Police
                           1711 Belmont Avenue
                           Baltimore, Maryland 21244
                           410-298-3883

Massachusetts              Crime Reporting Unit
                           Uniform Crime Reports
                           Massachusetts State Police
                           470 Worcester Road
                           Framingham, Massachusetts 01702
                           508-820-2111

Michigan                   Uniform Crime Reporting Section
                           Criminal Justice Information Center
                           Michigan State Police
                           7150 Harris Drive
                           Lansing, Michigan 48913
                           517-322-1424

Minnesota                  Criminal Justice Information Systems
                           Bureau of Criminal Apprehension
                           Minnesota Department of Public Safety
                           1246 University Avenue
                           St. Paul, Minnesota 55104
                           651-642-0670

Missouri                   Uniform Crime Reporting Program Office
                           Criminal Records and Identification
                             Division
                           Missouri State Highway Patrol
                           Post Office Box 568
                           Jefferson City, Missouri 65102-0568
                           573-526-6278

Montana                    Montana Board of Crime Control
                           Post Office Box 201408
                           Helena, Montana 59620-1408
                           406-444-4298

Nebraska                   Uniform Crime Reporting Section
                           The Nebraska Commission on Law
                             Enforcement and Criminal Justice
                           Post Office Box 94946
                           Lincoln, Nebraska 68508
                           402-471-3982

Nevada                     Criminal Information Services
                           Nevada Highway Patrol
                           808 West Nye Lane
                           Carson City, Nevada 89703
                           775-687-1600

New Hampshire              Uniform Crime Reporting Unit
                           New Hampshire State Police
                           New Hampshire Department
                             of Public Safety
                           10 Hazen Drive
                           Concord, New Hampshire 03305
                           603-271-2509

New Jersey                 Uniform Crime Reporting
                           New Jersey State Police
                           Post Office Box 7068
                           West Trenton, New Jersey 08628-0068
                           609-882-2000 X 2392

New York                   Statistical Services
                           New York State Division of Criminal
                             Justice Services
                           8th Floor, Mail Room
                           4 Tower Place
                           Albany, New York 12203
                           518-457-8381

North Carolina             Records and Criminal Statistics
                           State Bureau of Investigation
                           Post Office Box 29500
                           Raleigh, North Carolina 27626-0500
                           919-662-4509

North Dakota               Information Services Section
                           Bureau of Criminal Investigation
                           Attorney General's Office
                           Post Office Box 1054
                           Bismarck, North Dakota 58502
                           701-328-5500

Ohio *                     Office of Criminal Justice Services
                           Suite 300
                           400 East Town Street
                           Columbus, Ohio 43215
                           614-644-6797

Oklahoma                   Uniform Crime Reporting Section
                           Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation
                           Suite 300
                           6600 North Harvey
                           Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116
                           405-879-2533

Oregon                     Law Enforcement Data System Division
                           Oregon State Police
                           955 Center Street, Northeast
                           Salem, Oregon 97310-2559
                           503-378-3057

Pennsylvania               Bureau of Research and Development
                           Pennsylvania State Police
                           1800 Elmerton Avenue
                           Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17110
                           717-783-5536

Puerto Rico                Statistics Division
                           Puerto Rico Police
                           Post Office Box 70166
                           San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8166
                           787-793-1234 X 3113

Rhode Island               Rhode Island State Police
                           311 Danielson Pike
                           North Scituate, Rhode Island 02857
                           401-444-1121

South Carolina             South Carolina Law Enforcement Division
                           Post Office Box 21398
                           Columbia, South Carolina 29221-1398
                           803-896-7016

South Dakota               South Dakota Statistical Analysis Center
                           500 East Capitol Avenue
                           Pierre, South Dakota 57501-5070
                           605-773-6310

Tennessee *                Tennessee Bureau of Investigation
                           901 R.S. Gass Boulevard
                           Nashville, Tennessee 37216-2639
                           615-744-4014

Texas                      Uniform Crime Reporting
                           Crime Information Bureau
                           Texas Department of Public Safety
                           Post Office Box 4143
                           Austin, Texas 78765-9968
                           512-424-2734

Utah                       Data Collection and Analysis
                           Uniform Crime Reporting
                           Bureau of Criminal Identification
                           Utah Department of Public Safety
                           Post Office Box 148280
                           Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-8280
                           801-965-4566

Vermont                    Vermont Crime Information Center
                           103 South Main Street
                           Waterbury, Vermont 05671-2101
                           802-241-5220

Virginia                   Criminal Justice Information Services
                             Division
                           Virginia State Police
                           Post Office Box 27472
                           Richmond, Virginia 23261-7472
                           804-674-2023

Virgin Islands             Virgin Islands Police Department
                           Criminal Justice Complex
                           Saint Thomas, Virgin Islands 00802
                           809-774-2211

Washington                 Uniform Crime Reporting Program
                           Washington Association of Sheriffs and
                             Police Chiefs
                           Post Office Box 826
                           Olympia, Washington 98507
                           360-586-3221

West Virginia              Uniform Crime Reporting Program
                           West Virginia State Police
                           725 Jefferson Road
                           South Charleston, West Virginia 25309
                           304-746-2159

Wisconsin                  Office of Justice Assistance
                           Suite 202
                           131 West Wilson Street
                           Madison, Wisconsin 53702-0001
                           608-266-3323

Wyoming                    Uniform Crime Reporting
                           Criminal Records Section
                           Division of Criminal Investigation
                           316 West 22nd Street
                           Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002
                           307-777-7625

* National Incident-Based Reporting System Only

APPENDIX VI--National Uniform Crime Reporting Directory

Administration                                        304-625-3691
  Program administration; management; policy

Crime Analysis, Research and Development              304-625-3600
  Statistical models; special studies and
  analyses; crime forecasting

Information Dissemination                             304-625-4995
  Requests for published and unpublished
  data; printouts, magnetic tapes, and books

National Incident-Based Reporting System              1-888-UCR-NIBR
  (NIBRS)                                             (1-888-827-6427)

  Information for law enforcement agencies
  regarding the NIBRS certification process;
  federal funding for NIBRS-compliant
  records management systems; and data
  submission specifications

Quality Assurance                                     304-625-2941
  Assistance in confirming statistical
  validity and ensuring agency reporting
  integrity

Statistical Processing                                304-625-4830
  Processing of summary and incident-based
  reports from data contributors; reporting
  problems; requests for reporting forms;
  data processing; data quality

Training/Education                                    304-625-2821
  Requests for training of law enforcement
  personnel; information on police reporting
  systems; technical assistance

  Send correspondence to: Federal Bureau of Investigation
                          Criminal Justice Information Services
                            Division
                          Attention: Uniform Crime Reports
                          1000 Custer Hollow Road
                          Clarksburg, West Virginia 26306


Appendix VII--Uniform Crime Reporting Publications List

Crime in the United States (annual) *

Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted (annual) *

Hate Crime Statistics (annual) *

Killed in the Line of Duty: A Study of Selected Felonious Done with an intent to commit a serious crime or a felony; done with an evil heart or purpose; malicious; wicked; villainous.

An aggravated assault, such as an assault with an intent to murder, is a felonious assault.
 Killings of Law Enforcement Officers (special report)

In the Line of Fire: Violence Against Law Enforcement--A Study of Felonious Assaults on Law Enforcement Officers (special report)

Uniform Crime Reports: Their Proper Use (brochure A brochure or pamphlet is a leaflet advertisement. Brochures may advertise locations, events, hotels, products, services, etc. They are usually succinct in language and eye-catching in design. )

National Incident-Based Reporting System (brochure)

Preliminary Semiannual Semiannual

An event that occurs twice in a calendar year.

Notes:
A bond with semiannual coupons would issue payment once every six months.
See also: Annual, Bond, Coupon Bond
 Uniform Crime Report, January-June *

Preliminary Annual Uniform Crime Report *

Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook:

National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS)

Summary System

NIBRS:

Volume 1--Data Collection Guidelines *

Volume 2--Data Submission Specifications *

Volume 3--Approaches to Implementing an Incident-Based Reporting (IBR IBR

see infectious bovine rhinotracheitis.


IBR/IPV
see infectious bovine rhinotracheitis/infectious pustular vulvovaginitis.
) System **

Volume 4--Error Message Manual *

Addendum addendum n. an addition to a completed written document. Most commonly this is a proposed change or explanation (such as a list of goods to be included) in a contract, or some point that has been subject of negotiation after the contract was originally proposed by  to the NIBRS Volumes *

Conversion of NIBRS Data to Summary Data *

Supplemental Guidelines for Federal Participation

Manual of Law Enforcement Records

Hate Crime:

Hate Crime Data Collection Guidelines *

Hate Crime Magnetic Media Specifications for Tapes & Diskettes

Hate Crime Statistics, 1990: A Resource Book

Training Guide for Hate Crime Data Collection *

Age-Specific Arrest Rates and Race-Specific Arrest Rates for Selected Offenses

Periodic Press Releases:

Special Topics *

Hate Crime *

Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted *

* These publications are available on the FBI's Internet Internet

Publicly accessible computer network connecting many smaller networks from around the world. It grew out of a U.S. Defense Department program called ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network), established in 1969 with connections between computers at the
 site at

www.fbi.gov/ucr/ucr.htm.

** This publication is no longer in print.
COPYRIGHT 2001 Federal Bureau of Investigation
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2001, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Date:Jan 1, 2001
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Related Articles
Section VII: appendix I: methodology.
Appendix VII: Uniform Crime Reporting publications list.
Section VII: appendices.
Section VII: appendices.
Appendix I--methodology.
Appendix II--offenses in uniform crime reporting.
Appendix III--uniform crime reporting area definitions.
Appendix V--directory of state uniform crime reporting programs.
Appendix VI--national uniform crime reporting directory.
Appendix VII--publications provided by the UCR program.

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