Printer Friendly
The Free Library
22,710,190 articles and books

SUPERBUG SCARE SHUTS DOWN HEART OP WARD.

A heart surgery unit at a Scots hospital has been forced to close after an outbreak of a potentially- deadly superbug su·per·bug
n.
Any of various disease-causing bacteria that develop a resistance to drugs normally used to control or eradicate them.



superbug
.

The cardiac surgery Cardiac surgery is surgery on the heart and/or great vessels performed by a cardiac surgeon. Frequently, it is done to treat complications of ischemic heart disease (for example, coronary artery bypass grafting), correct congenital heart disease, or treat valvular heart disease  intensive care unit at the Western Infirmary The Western Infirmary is a teaching hospital situated in the West End of Glasgow, Scotland at . The hospital has just under five hundred beds with over a fifth of them dedicated to the Beatson Oncology Centre, responsible for cancer care , Glasgow, has been shut for a week since the MRSA MRSA Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. See MARSA.  bug was identified.

Around 20 heart operations in the nine-bed unit have been cancelled while it is given a deep clean by infection control experts.

It is not expected to be up and running again until the beginning of next week.

Three heart surgery patients are being treated in isolation at the hospital for MRSA infection.

The bug - which often strikes hospital patients with wounds from operations - is estimated to kill 100 people in Britain each year.

Although it is usually harmless and often carried on the skin, it can be particularly dangerous to the young and old and to those whose immune systems are weakened.

Infection can lead to potentially-fatal blood poisoning blood poisoning: see septicemia.  and complications such as pneumonia.

Another problem is the bug has mutated to develop resistance to penicillin and methicillin methicillin /meth·i·cil·lin/ (meth?i-sil´in) a semisynthetic penicillin highly resistant to inactivation by penicillinase; used as the sodium salt.

meth·i·cil·lin
n.
, making it hard to treat.

Because of the widespread nature of the bug, it is usually brought into hospitals by patients themselves and can only be detected by a swab.

Latest figures reveal a dramatic increase in the problem. Reports for the first three months of this year found 1524 reported cases of MRSA in Scots hospitals.

That is almost four times as high as the figure for the corresponding period in 1996.

A spokeswoman for the Western Infirmary said the cancelled operations were non- urgent and emergency admissions would not be affected.

She added: "The reason for the need to contain MRSA is that in a very small percentage of cases colonisation can lead to clinical infection."
COPYRIGHT 1998 Scottish Daily Record & Sunday
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1998 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Author:McGivern, Mark
Publication:Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland)
Date:Aug 1, 1998
Words:291
Previous Article:Two want to get to Hell.
Next Article:Mars bar robber jailed.



Related Articles
NEW KILLER SUPERBUG IS IN EVERY HOSPITAL; Medics admit they can't stop spread of bacteria.
BUG OFF; EXCLUSIVE Cleaners move out as 10th hospital virus victim found.
Sickness bug is back; Hospital wards shut by winter vomiting virus.
Second bone marrow death.
Targets blamed for MRSA deaths.
Cleaner wards to tackle superbugs; SUTTON COLDFIELD: Hospital modernisation plan to cut threat of infections.
Superbug outbreak shuts ward; Heart patients moved into isolation EXCLUSIVE.
Ward shut after bug outbreak.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters