Printer Friendly

SOME AT ROCKETDYNE SEE PLUSES IN SALE.

Byline: Deborah Adamson Daily News Staff Writer

Pushing a cart through a busy intersection on Canoga Avenue in Canoga Park, Dale Eckert looks like he doesn't have a care in the world.

The Rocketdyne inspector was just told Thursday morning that his employer is being bought by Boeing Co. of Seattle. But Eckert, a survivor of two previous Rockwell International layoffs, smells a difference this time around.

``I'm happy about it. I think it's going to be a good deal,'' said the lanky, 31-year Rocketdyne veteran on his way to another company facility.

``Everybody has a positive attitude about it,'' he said. ``We knew it was coming, but we just didn't know when.''

Eckert's attitude contrasts sharply with workers' comments last March amid rumors of a sale and anxiety about job losses.

Of the two dozen workers interviewed outside Rocketdyne headquarters Thursday, about a third echoed Eckert's bullish sentiments while two were waiting for more information before forming an opinion. The rest declined to comment.

One employee who didn't want to disclose his name expressed confidence that Boeing will keep most of Rocketdyne and, maybe, retain the rest of Rockwell intact.

``They gave us literature about it,'' he said. ``I'm not worried.''

He's confident because ``we're the only ones around that do this.''

A prime contractor for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Rockwell built the space shuttle and key components for the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo programs of the 1960s.

Its Rocketdyne Division builds replacement space shuttle engines, the electrical power system for Space Station Alpha, and engines for the Atlas and Delta commercial rockets.

Another employee believed that an alliance with Boeing makes Rockwell a much stronger aerospace and defense company.

``Rockwell has been going downhill,'' he said, declining to be identified.

But Claudio Alonso, a Rocketdyne inspector, is reserving judgment.

``I'm waiting for more information,'' he said.

Cautious optimism also was the word of the day at Rockwell's Palmdale plant.``There's a real positive feel about (the deal),'' said technical writer Jeff Storm.

WHO GETS WHAT BOEING GETS:

Rocketdyne Division, Canoga Park.

Rocket propulsion business.

3,700 employees in Canoga Park, 500 in the Santa Susana Hills and 746 employees at other locations throughout the country.

Major programs: Space shuttle main engines, space station electric power, X-33 missile engine, electro-optics and airborne laser program.

Space Systems Division, Downey.

Space shuttle modification business.

500 employees in Palmdale and 3,100 in Downey.

Major programs: Space shuttle prime contractor and Global Positioning System satellite manufacturer.

North American Aircraft Division, Seal Beach.

Aircraft modification business.

500 employees in Palmdale, 1,000 in Seal Beach and 1,000 in Tulsa, Okla.

Major programs: Modification of the B-1 bomber and production of airplane parts.

Other divisions:

North American Aircraft Modification Division, Anaheim.

Autonetics & Missile Systems Division, Anaheim.

Collins International Service Co., Richardson, Texas.

Systems Development Center, Seal Beach.

Rockwell's 50 percent share of Houston-based United Space Alliance, a joint venture with Lockheed Martin Corp.

Rockwell Australia, Canberra.

ROCKWELL RETAINS:

Rockwell Automation, Milwaukee.

Rockwell Avionics and Communications, made up of Collins Commercial Avionics and Collins Avionics & Communications Division, both based in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and the Communications Systems Division at Richardson, Texas.

Rockwell Semiconductor Systems, Newport Beach.

Rockwell Automotive, Troy, Mich.

Rockwell Science Center, Thousand Oaks.

Source: Rockwell International Corp.

CAPTION(S):

Photo, 2 Boxes

Photo: (Color) Dale Eckert, a 31-year Rockwell emp loyee, said Thursday he's happy about Boeing Co.'s acquisition.

Michael Owen Baker/Daily News

Box: (1--Color) Defense companies merge

Rockwell International Corp. will sell the bulk of its aerospace and defense businesses to Boeing Co. Some key projects

AP

(2) WHO GETS WHAT (See text)
COPYRIGHT 1996 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1996, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Business
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Aug 2, 1996
Words:606
Previous Article:THURSDAY IN ATLANTA : TODAY'S BEST BETS TENNIS FINAL:.
Next Article:BOEING TO BUY ROCKETDYNE : OTHER SPACE, DEFENSE UNITS INCLUDED IN $3.2 BILLION DEAL.
Topics:


Related Articles
STATE TO UNVEIL NUCLEAR HEALTH STUDY.
ROCKWELL DEBACLE: HOW DID IT START? : INVESTIGATORS PROBE WASTE VIOLATIONS.
ACQUISITION WON'T IMPEDE PROBE, CLEANUP.
ROCKETDYNE GETS HEALTH STUDY BEFORE PANELISTS.
EDITORIAL : A HEALTHY UNION BOEING'S PLAN TO BUY ROCKETDYNE APPEARS TO BE POSITIVE NEWS FOR BOTH COMPANIES.
EPA TO CLOSELY MONITOR ROCKETDYNE CLEANUP AFTER GROUP AIRS COMPLAINTS.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters