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SEVEN MANUFACTURING SECTORS GIVE MARYLAND EMPLOYMENT BOOST

 SEVEN MANUFACTURING SECTORS GIVE MARYLAND EMPLOYMENT BOOST
 TWINSBURG, Ohio, May 19 /PRNewswire/ -- For those who think that economic stability in Maryland rests on defense and aerospace manufacturing employment, here's a surprise. Statistics from the just published 1992 Harris Maryland Industrial Directory reveal that the three largest industrial sectors are: printing and publishing, electrical and electronic equipment, and food products manufacturing. "These are not only the largest sectors," according to Robert A. Harris, president of Harris Publishing Company of Twinsburg, Ohio, "But they're also the sectors that provided Maryland with a source of employment stability during the current recession."
 As the leading compiler/publisher and provider of manufacturers directories and directories on diskette for the United States and Canada, the Harris research staff contacts virtually all of the manufacturers in the state. "Our information is comprehensive and detailed," commented Harris. "Every entry is telephone verified, so the accuracy level is very high. Our research shows that despite a modest .9 percent overall drop in manufacturing employment over the last year, many sectors increased employment."
 Harris noted that the printing and publishing sector recorded a 5.4 percent gain in employment from April 1991 through April 1992, up from 30,279 in 1991 to 31,918 in 1992. That was followed by the electrical and electronic products manufacturing sector, with a 1.2 percent rise in employment from 29,084 in 1991 to 29,430 in 1992. Growth in this group was primarily found in the production of communications equipment and electronic components. Also, employment in food products manufacturing grew 1.4 percent from 22,745 in 1991 to 23,061 in 1992.
 Mark Wasserman, secretary for the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development agrees with the Harris findings. "Following the national trend, Maryland's manufacturing jobs have declined over the past decade, yet at the same time our manufacturing output has increased dramatically," said Wasserman. "Productivity in Maryland's manufacturing firms shows the highest increase of any state in the nation, and there is a new impetus here for improvement and expansion of our manufacturing base."
 Wasserman noted that the Maryland Foundation for Manufacturing Excellence and the Maryland Manufacturers Association have joined forces to implement a strategy of support for the manufacturing industry. "We anticipate future breakthroughs in the area of manufacturing new kinds of products that will evolve from our R&D leadership in the life sciences," added Wasserman, "and we want to prepare ourselves for the challenges ahead by utilizing new technologies and training our workforce."
 Governor William Donald Schaefer sees Maryland's manufacturing as a strategic priority. "In economic development, I want to concentrate on manufacturing -- the foundation for any non-agricultural economy, including ours," stated the Governor. "We have seen a sharp increase in overseas exports, but I am convinced we can capture a broader share of the international market. To that end, we are initiating an action plan to assist manufacturers, and I am personally committed to revitalizing this important sector of our economy."
 Based on input to date from manufacturers across the state, the Governor's Office identified five strategic priorities that will serve to focus the activities of government agencies and the educational community in the years ahead. They consist of:
 1. Create a competitive environment.
 2. Encourage and nurture new manufacturing ventures.
 3. Accelerate the modernization of existing manufacturers.
 4. Support the revitalization of the workforce.
 5. Help manufacturers to solidify existing markets and gain
 access to new markets.
 According to James E. Tebay, president of the Foundation for Manufacturing Excellence, Maryland is one of the few states where total value added by Manufacturing Industries has increased significantly in the past few years. "The percent change is 24 percent over the period of 1985 to 1989," said Tebay.
 With the recession winding down and competition to reach manufacturers increasing, Harris commented that Maryland marketers are ordering copies of the 1992 Harris Maryland Industrial Directory at an unprecedented rate. "We see a resurgence of new market prospecting taking place as the economy improves. We're hearing from new customers. People are telling us that they have to conduct their businesses more efficiently. And interestingly enough, we're hearing from more people who want their directory in diskette form for their personal computers. These businesses want in-depth information and they want it fast."
 The Harris statistics also showed other areas of increase included chemical manufacturing with a 1.1 percent jump in employment from 11,068 in 1991 to 11,194 in 1992. Miscellaneous manufacturing employment, which includes everything from the manufacturer of signs, jewelry, markers and toys to numerous other products, grew 1.4 percent from 4,792 in 1991 to 4,857 in 1992. Furniture and fixtures showed a modest .8 percent rise in employment from 2,910 in 1991 to 2,934 in 1992. One of the smallest sectors, petroleum and coal products produced the most rapid growth in manufacturing employment with a 6.9 percent jump from 2,086 in 1991 to 2,229 in 1992.
 Harris anticipates a slow but steady recovery for Maryland. "The people of Maryland possess an entrepreneurial spirit," he concluded. "We constantly hear company executives express their loyalty to the state. They care about their employees. Over 200,000 Marylanders were employed in manufacturing in 1991 and trends show the numbers will definitely be on the increase."
 For more information on Harris directories call 800-888-5900.
 Seven Maryland Manufacturing Employment Sectors
 Show Significant Growth
 Employment Pct. Change Emp.
 Industry 1991 1992 Increase
 Printing and publishing 30,279 31,918 5.4
 Electrical and Electronic
 equipment 29,084 29,430 1.2
 Food products 22,745 23,061 1.4
 Chemicals 11,068 11,194 1.1
 Misc. manufacturing 4,792 4,857 1.4
 Furniture and fixtures 2,910 2,934 .8
 Petroleum and coal products 2,086 2,229 6.9
 Source: 1992 Harris Maryland Industrial Directory
 -0- 5/19/92
 /CONTACT: Barbara Brouse of Harris Publishing Co., 216-425-9000, or 800-888-5900/ CO: Harris Publishing Co. ST: Ohio, Maryland IN: PUB SU:


CG -- CL002 -- 1609 05/19/92 07:33 EDT
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