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SENATORS VOTE TO RESTORE RULE ON OVERTIME PAY.

Byline: Associated Press

In a mild setback for the Wilson administration, the Senate voted Thursday to reverse a state commission decision and restore a requirement for overtime pay after eight hours of work per day.

But the vote fell far short of the two-thirds majority needed to override an anticipated veto by Gov. Pete Wilson.

Twenty-one senators, a bare majority of the 40-seat Senate, voted to send the overtime bill to the Assembly. Fourteen lawmakers opposed it.

The bill, by Sen. Hilda Solis, D-El Monte, would require time-and-a-half pay for employees in a variety of industries and businesses if they work more than eight hours a day and double-time pay after 12 hours a day.

An employer would not have to pay overtime for up to four hours of work if the employee was making up time taken off for personal reasons.

The bill also would set up a procedure similar to current practice, under which employees could vote to work four 10-hour days per week without overtime.

The bill is a response to a 3-2 vote last month by Wilson's Industrial Welfare Commission to abolish the eight-hour rule for 6 million nonunionized workers in a variety of industries.

Supporters say the commission's decision will make it easier for employees to work flexible schedules to deal with family needs and will bring California into line with overtime requirements in most other states.

But opponents say the change will mean child-care problems, lower pay and longer work shifts, particularly for part-time employees who won't be protected by the continuing requirement for overtime after 40 hours of work per week.

Critics also predict the decision will hurt union members by undercutting their ability to negotiate for eight-hour days.

AREA ROLL CALL

Here is how local legislators voted in the 21-14 roll call by which the California Senate approved legislation which would require overtime pay after eight hours of work per day for about six million California workers. On this vote, a ``yes'' vote was a vote to approve the bill and a ``no'' vote was a vote to reject the bill. Voting ``yes'' were 20 Democrats, 0 Republicans and 1 independent. Voting ``no'' were 0 Democrats, 14 Republicans and 0 independents.

FOR

Tom Hayden, D-Los Angeles

Richard Polanco, D-Los Angeles

Herschel Rosenthal, D-Los Angeles

Adam Schiff, D-Pasadena

Diane Watson, D-Los Angeles

AGAINST

W.J. ``Pete'' Knight, R-Palmdale

Cathie Wright, R-Simi Valley

CAPTION(S):

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Box: (Color) AREA ROLL CALL (See text)
COPYRIGHT 1997 Daily News
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Copyright 1997, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Article Details
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Title Annotation:BUSINESS
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:May 23, 1997
Words:409
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