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Rob Blake selected as chief of the Environmental Health Services Branch of CDC.

The Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services (EEHS) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has announced that Robert (Rob) Blake, M.P.H., R.E.H.S., president of the National Environmental Health Association, has been selected as the chief of the Environmental Health Services Branch.

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Mr. Blake comes to EEHS from the Georgia Division of Public Health, where he served as the director of the Environmental Health and Injury Branch.

From 1994 to 1999, Mr. Blake worked for the DeKalb County Board of Health in Georgia as assistant environmental health director. In 1999, he became environmental health director and influenced the field in numerous ways. During his tenure in Georgia, Blake started various initiatives to improve food safety, created a West Nile virus response plan, started an indoor air quality initiative, initiated a body art inspection program, launched a Web-based environmental health data management system, and increased involvement in county planning and zoning processes. He has also worked to market environmental health services as a discipline.

Blake is a past chair of the National Conference of Local Environmental Health Administrators (NCLEHA), the Metro-Atlanta Environmental Health Directors group, and the Metro Atlanta Surveillance Task Force (MASTF). He is a former member of the National Association of City and County Health Officials (NACCHO) Environmental Health Committee and is a current member of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) Environmental Health Directors workgroup.

Blake, who is from England, completed his undergraduate work in London, then worked for two years in England as a general environmental health officer. He then immigrated to the United States and served as an environmental health specialist in Saginaw, Michigan. After working three years in Saginaw, he returned to graduate school at the University of Michigan, where he earned his M.P.H. degree. Between 1986 and 1994, Blake worked as an environmental health specialist, community right-to-know coordinator, and environmental health director at the Washtenaw County Health Department in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
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Title Annotation:NEHA News
Publication:Journal of Environmental Health
Date:Oct 1, 2007
Words:333
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