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Rita McEwan--nursing leading, reformer and visionary.



With the death of Rita (Esmae) McEwan last November in Wellington, psychiatric nursing in New Zealand New Zealand (zē`lənd), island country (2005 est. pop. 4,035,000), 104,454 sq mi (270,534 sq km), in the S Pacific Ocean, over 1,000 mi (1,600 km) SE of Australia. The capital is Wellington; the largest city and leading port is Auckland.  has lost one of its early trailblazers.

McEwan was born in 1918 and educated in Canterbury. She registered as a psychiatric nurse at Ngawhatu Hospital in Nelson in 1943, as a general nurse at Gisborne's Cook Hospital in 1945 and as an obstetric ob·stet·ric or ob·stet·ri·cal
adj.
Of or relating to the profession of obstetrics or the care of women during and after pregnancy.



obstetrical, obstetric

pertaining to or emanating from obstetrics.
 nurse at Auckland's National Women's Hospital Women's Hospital of Greensboro (part of Moses Cone Health System)

As the state's first free-standing hospital dedicated to women, the Women's Hospital of Greensboro is a 134-bed hospital is dedicated to providing state-of-the-art, compassionate and personalized care to women
 in 1956. She completed the post graduate diploma A Graduate Diploma is generally a postgraduate qualification. Australia
See also:


Postgraduate diplomas offered in Australia are typical of those offered in England, Wales, and Ireland.
 of nursing in Wellington in 1952.

McEwan had a long and distinguished career as a psychiatric nurse in New Zealand and abroad. She was a tutor sister at Ngawhatu Hospital and the Auckland Mental Hospital and an assistant matron at Tokanui Hospital. In the 1950s she was appointed matron of Levin's Kimberley Hospital and Training School and in 1960 matron of Tokanui Hospital in Te Awamutu. During the last five years of her career, she returned to the psychiatric service as principal nurse of Porirua Hospital retiring in 1982.

Much of McEwan's work in mental hospitals was before drugs were available for the treatment of mental illness, when hospitals were locked and care was custodial, leaving much to be desired. She had tremendous empathy with people. She insisted on their dignity being respected and was an inspiration to nurses and people with mental illness alike. She was an advocate for and insisted on standards of professionalism for psychiatric nursing and the care of people with mental illness far beyond the standards of the time. She had a commanding presence and a vibrant and forceful personality. She was mentally and physically agile and always impatient to achieve progress. She used the strength of her personality to reform psychiatric nursing services.

McEwan also had a long and distinguished career internationally with the World Health Organisation over a period of 20 years. She established schools of nursing in Singapore, Iran and Egypt and did consulting and advising assignments in the Philippines, Fiji, Thailand, Nepal and Indonesia. She was one of New Zealand's major contributors to the development of nursing services internationally at that time. She maintained an extensive range of international contacts from those years of service to the benefit of New Zealand's services as well.

When McEwan was appointed nurse inspector in the Division of Nursing at the head office of the Department of Health in 1961, she was the first nurse from the psychiatric services to be appointed to the wider nursing field. Over subsequent years she held other positions as tutor and then principal at the School of Advanced Nursing Studies. She spent a lot of her time educating general nurses in the basic concepts of psychiatric nursing while advocating for the role of psychiatric nurses, improvement in their practice, and better standards of care Standards of care are medical or psychological treatment guidelines, and can be general or specific. They specify appropriate treatment protocols based on scientific evidence, and collaboration between medical and/or psychological professionals involved in the treatment of a given  for people with mental illness.

In retirement, McEwan held appointments on the Oakley Hospital Committee of Inquiry, the Health Services health services Managed care The benefits covered under a health contract  Personnel Commission, the Alcoholic Liquor Advisory Council, the C L Bailey Trust, the Richmond Fellowship Richmond Fellowship was founded in 1959 by Elly Jansen who bought a house in Richmond, London and invited patients from the local psychiatric hospital to live with her. She ran the house based on the ethos of a therapeutic community which proved very successful in reintegrating people , and was a selector for Volunteer Service Abroad. She also gave personal support to many nurses in their old age.

She was awarded the MBE MBE (in Britain) Member of the Order of the British Empire

MBE n abbr (BRIT) (= Member of the Order of the British Empire) → título ceremonial

MBE n abbr (Brit) (=
 in 1981 and NZNA's Gold Medal gold medal

traditional first prize. [Western Cult: Misc.]

See : Prize
 of Honour in 1983.

McEwan was an outstanding nursing leader in New Zealand and overseas over a period of 60 years. She articulated a vision of psychiatric nursing and, through her energy, persuasiveness and determination, made it happen. She was very effective in achieving change because of her vibrant personality and charming manner. She was an extraordinary person and those who worked with her remember her with the greatest admiration and affection.

Information provided by former matron of Christchurch's Sunnyside Hospital Sunnyside Hospital 1863-1999, was the first mental asylum to be built in Christchurch, New Zealand. It was initally known as 'Sunnyside Lunatic Asylum', and its first patients were 17 people who had previously been kept in the Lyttleton gaol.  and State Services Commissioner Heading the State Services Commission, the State Services Commissioner is the head of the New Zealand State Services. The current State Services Commissioner is Mark Prebble. Background  Margaret Bazley and psychiatric nursing researcher Kate Prebble
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Copyright 2007, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Title Annotation:NEWS AND EVENTS
Author:Prebble, Kate
Publication:Kai Tiaki: Nursing New Zealand
Article Type:Biography
Geographic Code:8NEWZ
Date:Feb 1, 2007
Words:617
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