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Riot police fire tear gas, charge protesters in Tunis.

TUNIS: Riot police riot police npolicía antidisturbios

riot police nforces fpl de police intervenant en cas d'émeute;
hundreds of riot police →
 fired tear gas tear gas, gas that causes temporary blindness through the excessive flow of tears resulting from irritation of the eyes. The gas is used in chemical warfare and as a means for dispersing mobs.  and baton-charged protesters Monday who staged demonstrations on a Tunis avenue where rallies are banned, in some of the worst violence seen in the Tunisian capital in months.

As hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets, the head of the Ennahda Islamist party which dominates parliament called on Tunisians to "be patient" and give the new government a chance to bring in reforms.

"Give the current government a chance. One has to be patient, it's the first elected government, they must be helped," Rached Ghannouchi told supporters at a rally outside the city center.

Hundreds of demonstrators marking Martyrs' Day and protesting against a ban on demonstrations on Habib Bourguiba Avenue, a main thoroughfare in Tunis, were brutally dispersed by riot police who detained a number of them.

Wrapped in Tunisian flags and shouting "We're not afraid, the people are here", the demonstrators sought shelter in neighboring streets and shops after police in trucks and on motorbikes repeatedly charged them.

"I'm here to honor our martyrs, and to protest against the ban on demonstrating here. We're the ones who freed Tunisia, they don't have the right to ban our peaceful marches," said septuagenarian sep·tu·a·ge·nar·i·an  
n.
A person who is 70 years old or between the ages of 70 and 80.

adj.
1. Being 70 years old or between the ages of 70 and 80.

2. Of or relating to a septuagenarian.
 protester Mohsen Ben Henda.

Other demonstrators said they were protesting against Ennahda, which emerged as the biggest party after an October election, the first democratic vote in Tunisia since the Arab spring uprising that ousted ex-strongman Zine El Abidine Ben Ali General Zine El Abidine Ben Ali (زين العابدين بن علي; born in Hammam-Sousse on September 3, 1936) is the President of the Tunisian Republic since 7 November, 1987 and only the second one .

"We came here today to demand our freedoms, to denounce the repression that Ennahda militias inflict on us every day," said Raed Korbi, a young doctor who had taken refuge in a cafe.

"What's happening today is terrible," said a woman who gave her name only as Yamina and said she was a lawyer, tears welling in her eyes.

"We are peaceful people and they bar us from using Habib Bourguiba Avenue, but they gave it to the Salafis," she said, referring to an ultraconservative Muslim group.

Tunisia banned demonstrations on Bourguiba Avenue, a symbol of the poplar uprising and a common site for rallies, after Islamist protesters demanding sharia law last month attacked a group of actors.

On Saturday, police forcefully dispersed a protest by thousands of unemployed graduates who tried to march on the avenue, wounding about 20, according to according to
prep.
1. As stated or indicated by; on the authority of: according to historians.

2. In keeping with: according to instructions.

3.
 organizers.

"I'm shocked," former Tunisian Human Rights League chief Mokhtar Trifi told AFP (1) (AppleTalk Filing Protocol) The file sharing protocol used in an AppleTalk network. In order for non-Apple networks to access data in an AppleShare server, their protocols must translate into the AFP language. See file sharing protocol. . "The people whom the revolution swept to power are now those who stop us from demonstrating. This is a really sad day."

"Look, this is the free Tunisia, the Tunisia of Ennahda," shouted another demonstrator.

A correspondent for French news weekly Le Point and the editor of Tunisian online news service Kapitalis were roughed up by police.

Interior ministry spokesman Khaled Tarrouche defended the ban, saying: "We will not let chaos take over."

He said police fired tear gas to avoid worse violence after demonstrators pelted them with objects, adding that a firebomb had destroyed a police car.

Martyrs' Day commemorates the bloody crackdown by French colonial French Colonial architecture was an American domestic archtectural style. It was most popular in the American South in states such as Louisiana.[1] Characteristics  troops on a protest in Tunis on April 9, 1938.

Addressing Ennahda supporters who rallied at a former prison site outside the city center for Martyrs' Day, Ghannouchi said the government had its work cut out to help Tunisia recover from the rule of ex-strongman Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, who fled in January 2011 after a popular revolt.

"It's impossible to correct in just a year what was destroyed in 50. The state we inherited is like a rotten hut which needs to be pulled down and cleaned up," he said.

Daily NewsEgypt 2012

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Publication:Daily News Egypt (Egypt)
Geographic Code:6TUNI
Date:Apr 9, 2012
Words:605
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