Printer Friendly

ROTABLATOR: 'MOST PROMISING' NEW ANGIOPLASTY DEVICE

 ROTABLATOR: 'MOST PROMISING' NEW ANGIOPLASTY DEVICE
 SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- Simon Stertzer, M.D.,


director of Medical Research for the San Francisco Heart Institute at Seton Medical Center in Daly City, Calif., recently released findings of 18 months of clinical trials utilizing a new angioplasty procedure called rotational ablation. The procedure utilizes a new device called the RotaBlator developed by Heart Technology Inc., in Bellevue, Wash. Following FDA guidelines, the San Francisco Heart Institute is one of only three facilities in California chosen to participate in the evaluation.
 Stertzer, who co-developed balloon angioplasty in 1977 with Andreas Gruntzig, M.D., and Richard K. Myler, M.D., said that the new RotaBlator system could be, "the single most important development in angioplasty since the advent of the over-the-wire balloon." Stertzer performed his first rotational ablation in September of 1990 and reports a 96 percent success rate in nearly 300 cases.
 While rotational ablation and balloon angioplasty are both non- surgical procedures, they differ in that balloon angioplasty uses a balloon-tipped catheter that is threaded into a partially blocked artery and then inflated to compress fatty deposits against the artery walls to re-open the artery. With rotational ablation, a steel burr is used in place of the balloon. The burr, embedded with 30 micron diamond chips, is guided through the artery and, once in place, rotates at 195,000 r.p.m. to core out the plaque blockage.
 The San Francisco Heart Institute, at Seton Medical Center, is one of the few facilities in the world to offer all types of angioplasty procedures including: balloon, laser, and directional atherectomy angioplasty, as well as rotational ablation angioplasty. Stertzer reports that "75 percent of all cardiac patients can now be treated with one or a combination of methods of angioplasty without resorting to open heart surgery." Stertzer further stated that he personally considers rotational ablation very much more useful than balloon angioplasty for difficult cases and vastly more effective than the recently FDA-approved laser angioplasty.
 Seton Medical Center is on the leading edge in treatment and research of cardiovascular disease and is one of the leading providers of state-of-the-art cardiology technology in America. The San Francisco Heart Institute at Seton Medical Center, founded in 1983, has an internationally respected reputation for cardiovascular research and education. The San Francisco Heart Institute will offer a course in the RotaBlator system this summer.
 FDA approval of the RotaBlator device is imminent. Once approved, qualified cardiologists across the country will have access to the new system. Stertzer believes that, given all of the technology now available to cardiologists, rotational ablation will soon be recognized as the most promising new form of angioplasty.
 Anyone desiring more information regarding coronary care should call Seton Medical Center's public information lines. When calling from California, the toll free number is 800-33-HEART; when calling from outside California, please call 800-82-HEART.
 -0- 2/14/92 R
 /CONTACT: Judy Jacobs or James Hollenbeck of I.D.E.A., 415-788-4777, for San Francisco Heart Institute/ CO: San Francisco Heart Institute ST: California IN: MTC SU: PDT


DG -- SF005 -- 0295 02/14/92 15:07 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Feb 14, 1992
Words:520
Previous Article:AIR RESOURCES BOARD CHAIRWOMAN'S RESPONSE TO AUTO/OIL STUDY ON CARS/GAS
Next Article:TOYOTA TO RAISE PRICES ON 1992 MODELS
Topics:


Related Articles
ADVANCED INTERVENTIONAL SYSTEMS ADDS NEW CATHETER TO CLINICAL TRIALS WITH EXCIMER LASER SYSTEM
CORDIS' SLEUTH ANGIOPLASTY CATHETER GAINS MARKET APPROVAL
CORDIS' ORION SOFT TIP ANGIOPLASTY CATHETER GAINS MARKET APPROVAL
TWO NEW CORDIS ANGIOPLASTY CATHETERS GAIN U.S. MARKET RELEASE
CORDIS TRAKSTAR ANGIOPLASTY CATHETERS APPROVED FOR US MARKET RELEASE
BOSTON SCIENTIFIC AND HEART TECHNOLOGY ANNOUNCE AGREEMENT TO MERGE
Boston Scientific Announces FDA Approval of RotaLink(R) Device.
Survivors of South Texas Man Call on FDA to Tighten Rules on Medical Devices; Family Settles Lawsuit Against Boston Scientific for Undisclosed Sum,...

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters