Printer Friendly

ROCHESTER GAS & ELECTRIC WILL REPLACE GINNA STEAM GENERATORS; PART OF OVERALL PLAN TO MEET FUTURE ENERGY NEEDS

 ROCHESTER, N.Y., Dec. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Rochester Gas and Electric Corp. (NYSE: RGS) announced today that it will replace the two steam generators in the Ginna Nuclear Plant in 1996.
 The Ginna plant meets about half of the electric energy needs of RG&E's customers.
 Steam generators are critical components of the Ginna plant. They produce the steam which turns a turbine. The turbine powers a generator which produces electricity.
 Cost of the replacement is estimated at $115 million. The units themselves cost about $40 million, and installation will cost about $60 million. The remainder of the cost is for engineering and other support services.
 Installation of the new steam generators will take about three months. Preparation for the replacement will begin during the plant's routine 1993 maintenance outage.
 The decision regarding Ginna is one part of an RG&E study of how the company can best meet its customers' future energy needs. The study, called the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP), looked at all of RG&E's energy sources and how they can help the company be its most competitive. The IRP concluded that the company should operate Ginna to the end of its licensed life in 2009. The study subsequently moved on to the question of steam generator replacement, and resulted in today's announcement.
 The new steam units will help assure that Ginna will operate at peak efficiency. Because of an intensive maintenance program, RG&E has received more years of service from Ginna's current steam generators than any other company with the same type nuclear plant.
 The company said installation of new steam generators is the most cost-effective option it evaluated as part of the IRP. Under study for about two years, other options were closing the Ginna plant, or allowing it to continue operating with the existing steam generators to 2009. Either option would require purchasing lost electric power elsewhere.
 Because of expected escalating costs associated with maintaining the existing steam generators, analysis showed that, amortizing the costs between now and 2009, replacing the steam units is the least-cost course of action for RG&E customers. The study concluded that retiring Ginna in the next few years was the most expensive choice.
 Replacing the steam generators will cost about $30 million less than the "continued operation" option, and about $100 million less than the retirement option.
 Continued operation of Ginna will also help RG&E meet its corporate commitment to a clean environment.
 In its 22 years of service to the community, the Ginna plant has achieved a performance record among the better nuclear plants in the U.S. Taking into account the annual shutdowns for routine maintenance, Ginna in recent years has been on-line about 85 percent of the time. The national average is about 70 percent.
 Like similar plants, it has experienced degradation in some of the 3,260 tubes that make up each steam generator. About 30 percent of the tubes have required repair. In addition, a chemical buildup on some of the tubes has reduced their heat transferring capability, causing a loss in plant capacity of about three percent, or 15 megawatts. Both conditions would continue to erode the plant's performance if the existing steam generators were left in place.
 Because of several design improvements since the first generation of units, as well as the aggressive maintenance program in place at Ginna, the new units should experience reduced maintenance costs and help improve plant availability.
 Installation of the units will be accomplished by a contractor yet to be
chosen. The project will provide about 500 short-term jobs for certain skilled trades.
 The existing steam generators will be removed from the Ginna containment structure with a crane. Each unit weighs 350 tons and is 63 feet tall. While the replacement is underway, RG&E will follow its normal aggressive practice of taking all necessary steps to safeguard workers and the public. Before the project begins, nuclear fuel will be removed from the plant's reactor and temporarily stored underwater in the spent fuel pool located nearby. RG&E does not expect any abnormal release of radiation to the atmosphere.
 The existing steam generators will become low-level radioactive waste. They will be placed in a protective structure which will be built on the Ginna grounds.
 FACT SHEET: GINNA STEAM GENERATOR REPLACEMENT
 -- Key reasons for replacing Ginna's steam generators:
 -- Lowest cost option for customers.
 -- Highest reliability of long-term electric supply.
 -- Shorter annual maintenance outages.
 -- Lower maintenance costs.
 -- Reduced radiation exposure for outage workers.
 -- The major maintenance consideration in the steam generators is the growing number of tubes that require plugging or sleeving during annual routine maintenance outages.
 -- Because of increasing maintenance costs and declining plant efficiency, continued operation with existing steam generators until retirement in 2009 would cost customers about $30 million more than replacing the steam units.
 -- Because the cost of the plant would not be fully amortized, retiring Ginna in the next few years would cost customers about $100 million more than replacing the steam generators.
 -- RG&E studied the option of replacing lost power by purchasing energy from alternative generators, by arranging long-term power contracts, and by re-powering existing RG&E facilities. The study determined that all of these options would be more costly to the customer than energy produced at Ginna.
 -- The major components of the replacement project -- the equipment and the installation -- were competitively bid. Their costs will be fixed, and any overruns will be borne by suppliers
 -0- 12/16/92
 /CONTACT: Richard Peck of Rochester Gas & Electric, 716-724-8813/
 (RGE)


CO: Rochester Gas & Electric ST: New York IN: UTI SU:

BM -- CL013 -- 7796 12/16/92 14:15 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Dec 16, 1992
Words:938
Previous Article:AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY'S DISBROW ANNOUNCES PLAN TO RETIRE
Next Article:SPRINT PARTICIPATES IN CONSTRUCTION OF FIRST TRANS-ATLANTIC NETWORK
Topics:


Related Articles
FUEL COSTS AT GINNA AMONG LOWEST IN U.S.
ROCHESTER GAS & ELECTRIC CORPORATION ANNUAL SHAREHOLDERS MEETING
SCE&G's SUMMER NUCLEAR STATION BEGINS OUTAGE FOR REFUELING AND STEAM GENERATOR REPLACEMENT
PSE&G UPDATES STATUS OF SALEM NUCLEAR GENERATING STATION
NUCLEAR UPDATE: HOPE CREEK GENERATING STATION RETURNS TO SERVICE;
RG&E ANNOUNCES SECOND QUARTER 1996 FINANCIAL RESULTS
Ginna To Go Out Of Service Briefly
RG&E to Take Ginna Out of Service for Tests
RG&E'S Ginna Nuclear Plant Returns to Service
RG&E Reports 1997 Third Quarter Earnings

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters