Printer Friendly

RESULTS OF PHASE I/II TRIAL ON LM-CD45 REPORTED AT BRITISH TRANSPLANT SOCIETY MEETING

 CAMBRIDGE, U.K., April 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Preliminary analysis of the results of a Phase I/II trial on LM-CD45, a drug for the prevention of acute rejection episodes following organ transplantation were presented to the British Transplant Society meeting April 7, 1993 in Exeter, UK by Dr. Lawrence Goldberg of St. Mary's Hospital, London on behalf of the Anti-CD45 Study Group.
 LM-CD45 is being developed by Cantab Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: CNTBY) of Cambridge, U.K., in collaboration with Baxter Healthcare Corporation of Deerfield, Ill. Scientists believe that rejection episodes are caused in part by the kidney's dendritic cells, which carry a protein known as the CD45 antigen. Researchers at Cantab have developed a pair of monoclonal antibodies that bind to the CD45 antigen and are designed to destroy dendritic cells: the drug is used ex-vivo to pretreat the donor kidney prior to transplantation.
 Dr. Goldberg reported that in an open label, safety study of 40 patients from four UK transplant centers, kidneys were pre-treated with LM-CD45 prior to transplantation and maintained at 4 degree celcius for at least 40 minutes. A biopsy was taken to measure antibody uptake using a double labelling immunohistological technique. The patients were followed for three months and the results showed the drug to be safe. There were no patient deaths, though four kidneys were lost: one from unremitting rejection; one from failure of reperfusion at the time of the transplant, probably due to pre-existing renal disease in the donor; and two from a thrombosis of the renal artery, (one of which was mechanical in aetiology). Only two patients had an antibody response to rat immunoglobulin (HARA) and one of these had HARA activity prior to treatment.
 Of the 40 transplants in the trial, 30 were analyzed for uptake of LM-CD45 by the donor kidney and the incidence of rejection episodes. There was a significant correlation (p.<0.05) between uptake and reduction in the number of acute rejection episodes. Eighteen of these patients received kidneys with high antibody uptake (defined as 95 percent or more of the cortical dendritic cells marked with LM-CD45) and of those, 4 (22 percent) experienced rejection episodes. Of the remaining 12 patients, 9 (75 percent) had episodes of rejection.
 Dr. Goldberg reported that the clinical trials of LM-CD45 will continue in 1993 with Phase II/III program, as is normal is drug development, to determine methods of optimizing uptake of the antibody and to confirm the safety and efficacy of LM-CD45 in preventing episodes of acute rejection following kidney transplantation in larger patient groups.
 -0- 4/7/93
 /CONTACT: Paul Haycock, M.D., Cantab Pharmaceuticals plc, (United Kingdom) 011-44-223-423413, or Anthony Russo, Ph.D. of Noonan/Russo Communications, 212-979-9180, for Cantab Pharmaceuticals plc/
 (CNTBY)


CO: Cantab Pharmaceuticals plc ST: IN: MTC SU:

AH-OS -- NY020 -- 3731 04/07/93 10:58 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Apr 7, 1993
Words:470
Previous Article:PNM SETTLES SUITS WITH GAS PRODUCERS
Next Article:PACIFIC ASIA TECHNOLOGIES APPOINTS KNOWLES CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
Topics:


Related Articles
RESULTS OF PHASE I/II TRIALS USING IMMUNOGEN'S ONCOLYSIN B SHOW POTENTIAL FOR PREVENTING RELAPSE IN CANCER PATIENTS
BAXTER, CANTAB SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETE PHASE I/II TRIALS FOR DRUG THAT REDUCES REJECTION IN ORGAN TRANSPLANTS
CANTAB REPORTS THE START OF A CLINICAL TRIAL CONDUCTED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF WALES COLLEGE OF MEDICINE FOR CERVICAL CANCER
AutoImmune Provides Update of Clinical Trial Programs for Oral Tolerance Pharmaceuticals
BioTransplant and MedImmune Report Phase II Results of BTI-322 to Treat Graft-versus-host Disease in Transplant Patients
AnorMED receives orphan drug designation new agent in stem cell transplants for cancer patients.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters