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RAIN POSSIBLE TODAY; TROPICAL STORM IS APPROACHING.

Byline: Lisa Van Proyen Daily News Staff Writer

Get the umbrellas handy - just in case.

After braving record-breaking, triple-digit temperatures in recent weeks, Southlanders are in for a chance of warm showers and thunderstorms beginning today. It's all because of a tropical storm named Frank that is expected to be about 500 miles south of Los Angeles by this morning, weather experts said.

The forecast calls for about a 20 percent chance of showers in the San Fernando Valley and parts of Ventura County today, increasing to a 30 percent chance Monday, said Bill Hoffer, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Oxnard.

The Antelope Valley's chances are stronger at 50 percent today and 60 percent Monday, he said.

But Hoffer said the forecast was continually changing as the weather service received reports Saturday night.

``Moisture is difficult to predict exactly where it's going to land,'' he said. ``We have to wait for Ol' Frank to truck up the coast to see what will happen.''

But even if Southlanders don't see rain, there will be plenty of humidity to swelter in. The humidity is expected to be at 70 percent to 85 percent thanks to tropical storm Frank on the West Coast of Baja California, Hoffer said.

``It'll be hot, muggy, a horrible thing.''

Laura Hannon, a senior meteorologist at AccuWeather, based in State College, Pa., echoed Hoffer.

``It's probably going to be uncomfortably humid in Southern California,'' she said. ``This amount of tropical moisture is unusual.''

Most areas of the Valley will reach the low- to mid-90s today. Combined with the high humidity levels, it will appear hotter, Hoffer said.

``It goes up exponentially,'' he said.

For Southern California desert and mountain areas, rainfall is more likely, with an 80 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms in the High Desert and Wrightwood, weather experts said.

``The brunt of the moisture will pass to the east of us,'' Hoffer said.

Meanwhile on Saturday, Simi Valley, which reached 100 degrees, tied its record high set in 1969 and 1970, the meteorologist said.

Woodland Hills, Northridge and Burbank reached 101 degrees Saturday, Hoffer said. Chatsworth peaked at 103.
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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Aug 9, 1998
Words:357
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