Printer Friendly

Pigments take their NOx.

Pigments take their [NO.sub.x]

Nitrogen oxides can chemiclaly after textile fibers, dyes and paints, but scientists have scant data on indoor [NO.sub.x] levels or on which oxide species might damage artworks most. Now, preliminary data from an umpublished study indicate some pigments are vulnerable to "very very low" levels of nitric acid, says Lynn G. Salmon of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Salmon observed that this pollutant -- one of the more reactive [NO.sub.x] species -- not only causes fading but also turns one green pigment purple.

The pigment study follows an assay of nitric acid in five Los Angeles museums. In four museums, Salmon and her co-workers found that levels were quite low, at only a few percent of outdoor levels. The fifth, which opened its windows in summer, sometimes had indoor nitric acid concentrations approaching 40 percent of outdoor levels. However, even low indoor levels do not guarantee the safety of museum holdings, the researchers report in the July ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. They say an accumulation of nitric acid on surfaces -- perhas including artworks -- appears to explain why one museum's indoor levels remained so low.
COPYRIGHT 1990 Science Service, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1990, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:nitrogen oxide with subscript
Publication:Science News
Date:Jul 14, 1990
Words:194
Previous Article:NO(subscript x)ious PAH-lution: precarious prediction.
Next Article:Tallying orbital trash: a debris-tracking telescope may ride the shuttle.
Topics:


Related Articles
Ozone depletion research wins Nobel.
Investing millions in environmental initiatives.
CAPITOL FUMES OVER SMOG CHECK; STATE LAWMAKERS CALL FOR SCRAPPING OF NEW PROGRAM.
SUNSET GETTING NEARER FOR STATE'S SMOG POLLUTION.
Cleaner diesel.
Considering diesel catalysts.
Bosch pursues diesel technology.
Diesel goes blue: if cleanliness is next to godliness then the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board must have...

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters