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Part 3 New jobs.

Most New Jobs Created Since 2003 are Part-Time

Most of the jobs created during the current wave of growth in Israel are parttime Adj. 1. parttime - involving less than the standard or customary time for an activity; "part-time employees"; "a part-time job"
part-time
. As we shall see, more than a quarter of their holders would prefer to work full-time.

Between 2003 and 2006, 256,500 new jobs were created; 143,000 of these (56%) were part-time and the balance of 113,500 (44%) were full-time. In 2005, for the first time, the number of new, full-time jobs exceeded the number of new part-time jobs. This trend has continued, but in 2006 there were fewer new full-time jobs than in 2005.

Most New Men's Jobs Created Since the Renewal of economic Growth are Full-Time

Examining the figures by gender, we find that most of men's new jobs are fulltime, while most of women's new jobs are part-time.

With respect to men, the current wave of economic growth is divided into two distinct periods: In the years 2003-2004, 85% of the new jobs created were parttime, while in the more recent years of 2005-2006, 93% of the new jobs created were full-time.

Most New Women's Job Created Since the Renewal of Economic Growth are Part-Time

The picture is different for women: During the current wave of growth, 20032006, the percentage increase of part-time jobs was significantly higher than the percentage increase of full-time jobs. During this 4-year period, only 30% of the 121,600 new jobs taken up by women were full-time. Nevertheless, for women as for men, 2005-2006 saw an increase in the number of full-time jobs.

What Kinds of Jobs Were Created?

The new jobs are in different sectors of the economy. Below we discuss women and men separately. (Note that data about the distribution by economic sector are available only up to 2005; therefore, the total figures presented below are different than those presented on the previous page, which also include 2006.)

Women

About half (49%) of the new jobs held by women are in the areas of health, welfare, social services social services
Noun, pl

welfare services provided by local authorities or a state agency for people with particular social needs

social services nplservicios mpl sociales 
, and education. The salaries in these services, especially in social and welfare services, are relatively low. In the business sector, business services experienced the greatest job growth. As evident in the following table, the business service category showing the most significant job growth was "Security and Cleaning Activities" (a growth rate of 45.7%), which consists of unskilled jobs at low pay. Another category with high growth is "Other Business Activities," which includes legal, bookkeeping and accounting services; advertising; architectural and engineering services, and other business services (a growth rate of 20%).

Men

Approximately one-third--37,000--of all new jobs taken by men were in the general category of Business Activities, including the sub-category "Security and Cleaning Services," which alone contributed 12,200 new jobs. This means that 12% of the new jobs resulted from the intifadah intifadah

(Arabic; “shaking off”)

Palestinian revolt (1987–93, 2000– ) against the Israeli occupation in the Gaza Strip and West Bank.
, and were not a product of normal economic growth. Together with the low-paying jobs, much better paying jobs were also taken up by men, primarily in the high-tech industry. These parallel developments reflect the split structure of the Israeli economy--dramatic growth in fields that have little investment and low wages, in parallel with fields that are heavily invested and offer high wages.

High Tech Cannot Employ All Israelis This is a list of prominent Israelis (including Arab citizens of Israel). Historical figures
Politicians

See also: List of Israeli politicians

  • Chaim Weizmann - first President of Israel (1949-52)
 

The most glamorous glam·or·ous also glam·our·ous  
adj.
Full of or characterized by glamour.



glamor·ous·ly adv.
 sector of the Israeli economy is high tech. It accounts for about half of all industrial exports and contains some of the biggest economic success stories of recent years.

However, only a small portion of the Israeli labor force works Force Works was a short-lived Marvel Comics superhero team. It first appeared in Force Works #1 (July 1994).

The group was formed from the remains of the West Coast Avengers, after leader Iron Man left the Avengers due to an internal dispute.
 in high tech --10% in 2005--even using the broadest possible definition, which includes not just the high-tech industry, but also high-tech services (see box below). The high tech sector in Israel was adversely affected by the bursting of the global high-tech bubble A bit in bubble memory or a symbol in a bubble chart.  in 2000, as well as by the recession resulting from the intifadah. This was clearly reflected in a loss of jobs. The decline came after the number of jobs had almost doubled in the second half of the 1990s, from 115,500 in 1995 to 207,500 in 2001.

During the years of intifadah, 2001-2003, high tech lost 15,000 jobs; in 2003, it had a total of 192,600 jobs. The female workforce declined by 11% and the male workforce by 5%.

In 2004, Israel's high tech sector began once again to expand, reflected in 4,500 new jobs--3,700 of them in electronic components (2,800 to men and 900 to women). In 2005, however, the biggest increase was in the field of "Medical and Scientific Equipment for Control and Supervision."

It should be noted that the intifadah affected not only jobs but also wage levels. Between 2001 and 2003, the average monthly wage for salaried persons in high tech declined by 10.5%, from NIS Niš or Nish (both: nēsh), city (1991 pop. 175,391), SE Serbia, on the Nišava River. An important railway and industrial center, it has industries that manufacture textiles, electronics, spirits, and locomotives.  15,787 to NIS 14,126. The sharpest decline was in high-tech services, especially computer services--a drop of 16%. When Israel began to emerge from the recession in 2004, there was a small increase in the average monthly wage in high tech, which continued in 2005.

Renewed re·new  
v. re·newed, re·new·ing, re·news

v.tr.
1. To make new or as if new again; restore: renewed the antique chair.

2.
 Economic Growth: Not a Boon Boon

A general term that refers to a benefit or improvement for investors. This can include such things as increased dividends, a stock market rally and stock buybacks.

Notes:
 to All Workers

At the time of writing, some 290,000 Israeli workers are unable to benefit from the renewed economic growth, either because they are unemployed, have despaired of finding work, or are working part-time instead of full-time. Each of these groups is briefly reviewed below.

The Unemployed

During the intifadah, unemployment rose sharply: In 2002, 2003 and 2004, unemployment exceeded 10%. Such a high level of unemployment had previously occurred only in 1991-1993, during the peak years of immigration immigration, entrance of a person (an alien) into a new country for the purpose of establishing permanent residence. Motives for immigration, like those for migration generally, are often economic, although religious or political factors may be very important.  from the former Soviet Union.

In the past two years, with resumed economic expansion, unemployment gradually grad·u·al  
adj.
Advancing or progressing by regular or continuous degrees: gradual erosion; a gradual slope.

n. Roman Catholic Church
1.
 decreased to 9% in 2005 and 8.4% in 2006 (CBS (Cell Broadcast Service) See cell broadcast. , L abor Force Survey 2005; Press Release of February February: see month.  28, 2007).

The Worsening wors·en  
tr. & intr.v. wors·ened, wors·en·ing, wors·ens
To make or become worse.

Noun 1. worsening - process of changing to an inferior state
decline in quality, deterioration, declension
 Situation of the Unemployed

Unemployed persons are entitled en·ti·tle  
tr.v. en·ti·tled, en·ti·tling, en·ti·tles
1. To give a name or title to.

2. To furnish with a right or claim to something:
 to unemployment compensation only under certain conditions. The first requirement is that they register with the Government Employment Service. If, after registration, the Employment Service fails to find work for them, they are entitled to submit a request for unemployment compensation to the National Insurance Institute.

The bureaucratic bu·reau·crat  
n.
1. An official of a bureaucracy.

2. An official who is rigidly devoted to the details of administrative procedure.



bu
 procedures result in only some of the unemployed registering with the Employment Service--about 80% on average since 1995. A much smaller proportion actually receives unemployment compensation: In 1995-2001, an average of 46% of the unemployed received compensation (calculation based on Esther Esther (ĕs`tər), book of the Bible. It is the tale of the beautiful Jewish woman Esther [Heb.,= Hadassah], who is chosen as queen by the Persian King Ahasuerus (Xerxes I or II) after he has repudiated his previous wife, Vashti.  Toledano, Recipients of Unemployment Compensation in 2005, Table A). Between 2002 and 2006, the terms of entitlement An individual's right to receive a value or benefit provided by law.

Commonly recognized entitlements are benefits, such as those provided by Social Security or Workers' Compensation.
 to unemployment compensation became much more stringent. As a result, the proportion of unemployed persons receiving compensation dropped to about 24% in 2006 (data from the Research and Planning Administration of the National Insurance Institute, April 26, 2007). In addition, the payments themselves were sharply curtailed. As a result, although the number of unemployed persons rose, total payments declined from an average of NIS 3.754 billion in 2001-2002 to NIS 1.957 billion in 2006 (at 2006 prices; Esther Toledano, Recipients of Unemployment Compensation in 2005, Table 2; data for 2006 were obtained from the Research and Planning Administration of the National Insurance Institute, April 26, 2007).

In other words Adv. 1. in other words - otherwise stated; "in other words, we are broke"
put differently
, the safety net which once existed for unemployed women and men has greatly deteriorated.

Increase in the Duration of Unemployment

While the unemployment rate is slowly declining, the duration of unemployment is increasing. In 2005, some 24% of unemployed women and 27% of unemployed men remained unemployed for over a year; two years earlier, in 2003, only 18% of men and women remained unemployed for that long. The proportion of those seeking work for over four years has also recently increased, and the number of those seeking work for 2-4 years also rose slightly. On the other hand, the proportion of those seeking work for two years or less has declined.

Unemployed Persons Who Give Up Looking for Work

Among the unemployed, there is another significant group--those who have given up looking for work. These are people who want to work, but whose failed efforts over a long period of time have led them to stop looking for a job. In 2005, their proportion among Jews Jews [from Judah], traditionally, descendants of Judah, the fourth son of Jacob, whose tribe, with that of his half brother Benjamin, made up the kingdom of Judah; historically, members of the worldwide community of adherents to Judaism.  amounted to 1.0% of the Jewish Jew·ish  
adj.
Of or relating to the Jews or their culture or religion. See Usage Note at Jew.



Jewish·ly adv.
 work force, compared with 1.3% in 2000 (for April through December December: see month.  2000). If we add those who have given up looking for a job to the ranks of the officially unemployed, we find that the real unemployment rate is higher than that reported in the media.

The increase in the number of people who gave up looking for a job is greater among Arab and "other" citizens ("others" are Christians Christians, name taken by the followers of several evangelical preachers on the American frontier, notably James O'Kelley, Abner Jones, and Barton W. Stone, all of whom were antisectarian.  who are not Arabs Arabs, name originally applied to the Semitic peoples of the Arabian Peninsula. It now refers to those persons whose primary language is Arabic. They constitute most of the population of Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, , most of them immigrants from the former Soviet Union), and this is especially true for women. Over the last five years, the proportion of male "Arabs and others" who have given up on finding a job increased from 4.1% to 8.7%, while the proportion of women increased from 6.9% to 12.8%. In short, 10% of the civilian work force of "Arabs and others" are men and women who have despaired of finding a job (CBS, Labor Force Surveys, various years).

Part-Time Workers Who Desire Full-Time Jobs

Finally, another group that might be added to the ranks of the unemployed are workers employed part-time who desire full-time jobs. In 2000, some 19% of part-time workers in Israel reported that they wanted to work full-time; in 2006, this rose to 23.0%. These women and men want to work more, but are not finding full-time positions (ibid.). The proportion of dissatisfied dis·sat·is·fied  
adj.
Feeling or exhibiting a lack of contentment or satisfaction.



dis·satis·fied
 part-time workers in Israel is three times larger than in countries of the OECD OECD: see Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. . An analysis conducted by the Bank of Israel The Bank of Israel (Hebrew: בנק ישראל‎) is the central bank of Israel. The Bank of Israel is located in Jerusalem, with a branch office in Tel Aviv.  noted that some 80% of dissatisfied part-time employees are women (Bank of Israel, 2005 Report, pp. 178-181).

The hi tech sector includes a number of manufacturers (pharmaceuticals, machinery, electronic components, communications equipment, quality control equipment, and the aircraft industry), as well as a number of services (communications, computer services Data processing (timesharing, batch processing), software development and consulting services. See service bureau, SaaS and ASP. , research and development).
New employees
By Type of Job * 2003-2006 * Percentage Change

Type of Job   2003   2004   2005   2006

Full-time     0.6%   0.3%   3.5%   2.9%
Part-time     6.2%   9.2%   4.3%   2.1%

Note: Does not include persons temporarily absent from work.

Sources: Adva Center analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics, Press
Release of February 28, 2007, "Statistics from the Manpower Survey for
the Last Quarter of 2006 and for the Year 2006"; CBS, Manpower Survey
2005.

New employees: men
By Type of Job * 2003-2006 * Percentage Change

Type of Job   2003    2004   2005   2006

Full-time     0.5%    0.5%   3.8%   3.0%
Part-time      10%   15.2%   0.7%   1.4%

Note: Does not include persons temporarily absent from work.

Sources: Adva Center analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics, Press
Release of February 28, 2007, "Statistics from the Manpower Survey for
the Last Quarter of 2006 and for the Year 2006"; CBS, Manpower Survey
2005.

New employees: Women
By Type of Job * 2003-2006 * Percentage Change

Type of Job   2003   2004   2005   2006

Full-time     0.8%   0.1%   3.0%   2.7%
Part-time     4.4%   6.1%   6.3%   2.5%

Note: Does not include persons temporarily absent from work.

Sources: Adva Center analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics, Press
Release of February 28, 2007, "Statistics from the Manpower Survey for
the Last Quarter of 2006 and for the Year 2006"; CBS, Manpower
Survey 2005.

Women: New Employees by Economic Sector
2003-2005 * Economic Sectors With at Least 2,000 New Female Employees
* In Descending Order of Number of New Women Employees * Thousands and
Percentages

                                              New Female   Percentage
                                              Employees     Change
                                              2003-2005    2003-2005

Total                                           107.3        10.3%
Health, Welfare and Social Services              27.0        15.0%
Education                                        25.0        11.4%
Business Activities                              23.4        20.3%
  Thereof: Other business activities             12.6        20.7%
    Thereof: Legal and notary services            3.7        25.2%
    Thereof: Architecture, engineering, and       2.6        22.8%
      other technical activities
  Thereof: Security and cleaning activities       7.9        45.7%
Trade and Repair of Motor Vehicles                9.6         7.4%
Household Services by Individuals                 6.4        20.3%
Transport, Storage and Communications             5.9        14.5%
Hotel and Restaurant Services                     5.4        13.4%
Banking, Insurance & Finance                      4.9        11.4%
Manufacturing                                     4.4         4.2%
  Thereof: Publishing and printing                2.7        36.0%

Source: Adva Center analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics, Manpower
Surveys, various years.

Men: New employees by economic sector
2003-2005 * Economic Sectors With at Least 2,000 New Male Employees
* In Descending Order of Number of New Men Employees * Thousands and
Percentages
                                              New Male    Percentage
                                              Employees     Change
                                              2003-2005    2003-2005

Total                                           101.9         8.2%
Business Activities                              36.7        23.0%
  Thereof: Other business activities             13.2        21.5%
    Thereof: Architecture, engineering, and       4.8        24.4%
    other technical activities
    Thereof: Legal and notary services            2.4        16.0%
  Thereof: Security and cleaning activities      12.2        34.9%
  Thereof: Computer services                      7.2        17.8%
Hotel and Restaurant Services                    16.8        31.9%
Trade and Repair of Motor Vehicles               15.7         8.7%
Transport, Storage and Communications             9.8         9.2%
Manufacturing                                     9.7         3.6%
  Manufacturing: Metal products                   5.0        13.3%
  Manufacturing: Electronic components            4.2        40.0%
  Manufacturing: Transport equipment              3.1        19.4%
  Manufacturing: Industrial equipment for         2.3        12.7%
  control & supervision, medical scientific
  equipment
Construction                                      7.6         6.9%
Community, Social, & Personal Services            6.0        10.9%
Health, Welfare & Social Services                 5.0         9.2%
Agriculture                                       3.4         9.1%

Source: Adva Center analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics, Manpower
Surveys, various years.

Hi-Tech Workers
By Gender * 2000-2005 * Total Workers and Percentage of New Workers
* by Sub-Sector * Thousands

                          2000    2001    2002    2003    2004    2005

High-Tech Sector--Total   189.3   207.5   193.2   192.6   197.1   217.2

Men                       123.1   134.6   126.1   127.8   131.5   143.8
Women                      66.0    72.7    67.0    64.8    65.5    73.5
New Workers: Men           22.9    11.4    -8.5     1.7     3.7    12.3
New Workers: Women         13.9     6.7    -5.7    -2.2     0.7     8.0

Manufacturing in the       89.2    92.2    89.3    89.7    93.4   100.0
High-Tech Sector

Men                        60.9    61.5    61.0    62.5    65.0    65.9
Women                      28.3    30.5    28.1    27.2    28.4    30.4
New Workers: Men            6.9     0.6    -0.5     1.5     2.5     4.5
New Workers: Women          4.4     2.2    -2.4    -0.9     1.2     2.1

Services (knowledge-      100.1   115.3   103.9   102.9   103.7   117.3
intensive) in the
High-Tech Sector

Men                        62.3    73.1    65.1    65.3    66.5    74.3
Women                      37.7    42.2    38.9    37.7    37.2    43.0
New Workers: Men           16.0    10.8    -8.0     0.2     1.2     7.8
New Workers: Women          9.5     4.5    -3.3    -1.2    -0.5     5.8

Sources: Adva Center analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics,
Manpower Surveys, various years.

Average Wage of Hi-Tech Workers
2001-2005 * NIS * Constant 2006 Prices

                                                2001     2002     2003

High-Tech Sector--Total                        15,787   14,525   14,126

Manufacturing in the High-Tech Sector--Total   15,103   14,523   14,337

  Thereof: Electronic components               12,208   12,445   12,379
  Thereof: Electronic communications           18,305   17,278   17,270
  equipment
  Thereof : Industrial equipment for           17,788   16,970   16,624
  control and supervision, medical

  and scientific equipment
  Thereof: Transport equipment                 14,062   13,621   13,502
  (including aircraft manufacture)

Services (knowledge-intensive)                 16,315   14,527   13,957
in the High-Tech Sector--Total

  Thereof: Communications                      11,124   10,129    9,865
  Thereof: Computer services                   18,291   16,180   15,422
  Thereof: Research and development            17,394   16,346   16,195

                                                2004     2005

High-Tech Sector--Total                        14,430   14,875

Manufacturing in the High-Tech Sector--Total   14,449   14,850

  Thereof: Electronic components               10,799   11,029
  Thereof: Electronic communications           18,217   18,551
  equipment
  Thereof : Industrial equipment for           17,353   17,745
  control and supervision, medical
  and scientific equipment
  Thereof: Transport equipment                 13,418   14,026
  (including aircraft manufacture)

Services (knowledge-intensive)                 14,414   14,895
in the High-Tech Sector--Total

  Thereof: Communications                       9,515    9,424
  Thereof: Computer services                   16,009   16,481
  Thereof: Research and development            17,432   18,487

Note: Data for 2004 and 2005 are based on a new survey.

Sources: Adva Center analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics, Manpower
Surveys, various years.

New employees
By Type of Job * 2003-2006 * Thousands

      full   part
      time   time

2003   8.6   37.7
2004   5.2   59.2
2005  53.8   30.4
2006  45.9   15.7

Note: Does not include persons temporarily absent from work.

Sources: Adva Center analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics, Press
Release of February 28, 2007,
Statistics from the Manpower Survey for the Last Quarter of 2006 and
for the Year 2006"; CBS, Manpower Survey 2005.

New employees: men
By Type of Job * 2003-2006 * Thousands

       full   part
       time   time

2003    4.5   19.8
2004    4.5   33.0
2005   33.0   37.2
2006    1.7    3.5

Note: Does not include persons temporarily absent from work.

Sources: Adva Center analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics, Press
Release of February 28, 2007, "Statistics from the Manpower Survey for
the Last Quarter of 2006 and for the Year 2006"; CBS, Manpower Survey
2005.

New employees: Women
By Type of Job * 2003-2006 * Thousands

       Full   part
       time   time

2003    4.2   17.8
2004    0.7   26.2
2005   16.6   28.7
2006   15.2   12.2

Note: Does not include persons temporarily absent from work.

Sources: Adva Center analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics, Press
Release of February 28, 2007,
Statistics from the Manpower Survey for the Last Quarter of 2006 and
for the Year 2006"; CBS, Manpower Survey 2005.
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Publication:Israel Labor Report
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:7ISRA
Date:May 1, 2007
Words:2972
Previous Article:Part 2 High wages, low wages.
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