Printer Friendly

PISTOLS IN MAIL ONLY GIMMICK FOR WESTERN FILM TRIBUTE

 PISTOLS IN MAIL ONLY GIMMICK FOR WESTERN FILM TRIBUTE
 LOS ANGELES, Feb. 27 /PRNewswire/ -- Employees of the post office


need not worry about a certain group of pistols that are being sent in the mail, even though the guns are not registered. These weapons turned out to be toys -- cap guns, to be exact -- and they're being sent to film distributors and members of the press by showman R.J. Thomas to promote "Western Flickers," his tribute to the silent-era shoot-em-ups.
 The rip-roaring days of Tom Mix are back with Thomas' story of a film studio that churned out westerns -- or "oaters" as they were sometimes called -- for 20 years.
 "Western Flickers" (available on home video from Canyon Cinema, 2325 Third Street, Suite 338, San Francisco, CA, 94107, 415-626-2255, $29.95) is a mock-documentary about Thomas West, a bicycle repairman from Ohio who accidentally became the head of a run-down movie studio in California. Though initially inexperienced, West managed to turn a bankrupt company into the most prolific western film studio of the silent era.
 After West's success, ex-bounty hunter T.J. Spikes asked the studio to film his pursuit (and, hopefully, capture) of "The Cactus Kid," a notorious outlaw who had been robbing banks for 25 years without being caught. Spikes wanted the adventure filmed as "the greatest western ever made." West asked Spikes how he was going to catch an outlaw who had eluded the law for more than two decades. Spikes' reply: "Leave that up to me. Your job is to make a movie."
 Thomas first attracted national attention in 1987 with "I Write A Mystery," his audiocassette spoof of old radio thrillers that carried a "warning notice" regarding the show's "unbearable suspense." He followed this with "The Politician's Life," a film send-up of Jack Kennedy concerning "the greatest congressional primary race ever held." The picture toured the festival circuit in 1990 and is also available from Canyon Cinema. He is now awaiting the video release of "The Great 1950s Science Fiction Movie," a parody of the Roger Corman drive-in cheapie.
 Thomas wrote, produced, and directed "Western Flickers" and also appears in the pic as a struggling filmmaker (circa 1947) trying to make a documentary about the Western Flickers studios.
 The promotional pistols spoof the gun that Spikes used on his quest for "The Cactus Kid." "Spikes told his men that he was to get the first shot in," a Spikes crony remembers in the film. "He was terrified that a second banana would shoot 'The Kid' before he did."
 -0- 2/27/92
 /CONTACT: R.J. Thomas, 805-297-1831/ CO: ST: California IN: ENT SU:


AL-KJ -- LA007 -- 3258 02/27/92 12:07 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Feb 27, 1992
Words:447
Previous Article:WAYNE DUBAND NAMED PRESIDENT, WARNER BROS. INTERNATIONAL THEATRICAL DISTRIBUTION DIVISION
Next Article:UNION PACIFIC DIRECTORS DECLARE QUARTERLY DIVIDEND OF 34 CENTS A SHARE
Topics:


Related Articles
PICK OF THE BOX; MUSIC.
Guns, girls and godfathers ... the whole enchilada; THE MEXICAN (15).
America remembers presents: the Elvis Presley Western Tribute Revolver.
Never mind the Beatles ...
Never mind the Beatles. . . it's time for punk.
John Wayne centennial holster set.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters