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PARTY ANIMALS; Posh schoolkids in orgy of sex and drugs Teens as young as 13 trash pupil's house Telly melted by paintstripper, goods stolen.

Byline: By Michael Christie

DRINK-and-drug-crazed pupils at one of Scotland's top private schools caused pounds 15,000 of damage at a party.

It happened after a fifth-year boy was left in his upmarket home alone to study and held the bash with his pals while his parents took a Florida break.

Police were called after more than 100 people trashed the house.

Many of the partygoers were from posh St Aloysius' College in Glasgow - and some were as young as 13.

Now the school's headmaster has sent a letter to parents saying: 'In all my years of teaching I have never come across anything as extreme as what happened.

'I am frankly appalled.'

Pictures were torn off walls, the basement was spray painted and goods including a Sony PlayStation stolen.

A TV melted after paint stripper was poured on it and light sockets were torn off the walls.

Mud was smeared over carpets and food shoved into an uncovered blender, which showered the kitchen walls.

Drugs, booze and used condoms were found in the house.

Patrick Low, 16, hosted the party for a few friends - but someone leaked the details and a horde of gatecrashers came.

Patrick, the son of management consultant David Low, had been left at the house in Glasgow's West End to study for his exams.

Mr Low is considering legal action when he finds out who caused the damage.

The school - motto 'Ad majora natus sum' I am born for greater things - have written to parents to urge those involved to come forwardMr Low said: 'My son, out of some misguided loyalty to his friends at school, hasn't told me anything of any consequence. Having said that, I now know what happened, having got statements from some of the younger people that were at the party.

'I am pretty annoyed. I am disappointed but I don't consider my son responsible for this.

'It got out of hand but it has cost around pounds 15,000 to put right.'

Mr Low and wife Noelle had left for a week-long holiday on a Friday and a family friend was to stay with Patrick from the following day.

Mr Low agreed that six of Patrick's friends could stay over on the Friday night. But one pal, described by David as 'a twit', spread the news of the party at the Lows' house using internet messaging.

Within hours, more than 100 people had turned up and events quickly spiralled out of control.

According to Mr Low, the majority were fifth-year pupils from St Aloysius' College.

Others were from the sixth form and a handful were in their second and third years.

Older youths also turned up, some of whom are suspected of supplying the drugs and booze.

Mr Low added: 'In some of the bedrooms, used condom packets, earrings and sundry items of clothing were found'Drugs were found, grass, and there were empty bottles everywhere.

'Some of them appeared to be stoned and drunkwhich resulted in vandalism and sexual activity.'

One 16-year-old was arrested and charged with theft when police arrived to break up the party.

Parents pay up to pounds 6700 a year to send a child to the 146-year-old Catholic college.

It educates boys and girls aged three to 18 years, 450 in the junior school and 800 in the senior school.

Many former pupils will be horrified to learn of the debauched party. The school's reputation is built on academic excellence and religious piety. Its long line of head teachers were all Jesuit priests until September last year when John Stoer took over from Father Adrian Porter.

When the Lows contacted Mr Stoer, he sent a letter to the parents of pupils suspected of being involved asking them to discuss the matter among themselves.

However, some parents are angry that their son or daughter has been implicated in the drink and drug-fuelled orgy when they were nowhere near the house.

But Mr Low backed the headmaster's stance, saying: 'I have no criticism of the school or the headmaster or the way they have handled this.

'They have acted immediately, responsibly and firmly.

'They are shocked and are concerned about the behaviour or some of their pupils.'

Mr Stoer said that the school could not take any direct action because the party took place at a weekend during the school holidays.

Instead, he sent a letter to parents of children he believed were at the party, regardless of their activities that night.

He added: 'It is now a matter for them how they pursue it with their children. But I have made it clear that such behaviour is totally unacceptable and incompatible with the ideals of the school.

'While in no way condoning such activities, it should be noted that many of our pupils felt uncomfortable with what was developing and left the party before any trouble started.

'This serves as a warning to parents as to what might happen at other parties their children might want to attend.

'The school was already planning a series of meetings with parents to discuss the problems that teenagers today face and how parents can help.

'These will now assume even greater importance

CAPTION(S):

FEES: St Aloysius' charges pounds 6700 a year; PRIVATE: St Aloysius' College; ANGRY: Dad; David Low
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Publication:Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland)
Date:Apr 26, 2005
Words:880
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