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Out and about: Experts for CCW.

A NORTH Wales-based broadcaster is among a quartet of members of the Countryside Council for Wales announced by Environment, Planning and Countryside Minister Carwyn Jones.

Dei Tomos, a broadcaster and journalist from Nantperis, Caernarfon, first became a member of CCW 1997. A founder member of "Clwb Mynydda Cymru" the Welsh Mountaineering Club and a former member of the Snowdonia National Park Authority, he is vice president of the Campaign for the Protection of Rural Wales and the Council for National Parks. Dei, currently the Clerk to Llanberis Community Council, has been appointed for his knowledge and expertise in the media.

Robin Pratt, a livestock farmer in Pembrokeshire who farms South American Guanaco, first joined CCW in 1997. He was formerly Chair of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority and a member of the Secretary of State's Agricultural Advisory Panel. The two new members of CCW are a self-employed broadcaster, writer and publisher and a hill farmer from Ceredigion.

William Patrick O'Reilly, from Llandysul, Carmarthenshire, is currently the Managing Director of First Nature, a publishing enterprise specialising in wildlife, ecology and environmental education topics.

Dr Ieuan Joyce runs a hill farm in Ystumtuen, Ceredigion, as well as farming with his parents on a 150 dairy and sheep farm straddling the Welsh/English border in Kington, Herefordshire: he has been a lecturer in the School of Biology, University of Leeds
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Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Daily Post (Liverpool, England)
Date:Oct 6, 2005
Words:228
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