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Organic polymer tested as optical link.

Models of "information superhighways" use inorganic crystals to convert electric signals to light. Organic polymers, however, promise to be easier to integrate into a high-speed communications network, as well as mechanically tougher and less expensive than crystals (SN: 8/3/91, p.77).

Scientists at IBM's Almaden Research Center in San Jose, Calif., have shown that electro-optic polymers can impart the information from six cable television channels onto a single laser beam for transmission through optical fibers. "We're getting TV pictures that are very near commercial broadcast quality," says IBM's Barton A. Smith.

The investigators' TV test apparatus will help them further develop such promising polymers, says Smith, who presented his team's findings at the spring meeting of the Materials Research Society, held last month in San Francisco.
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Title Annotation:organic polymers used to convert cable television information into laser beam for transmission through optical fibers
Publication:Science News
Article Type:Brief Article
Date:May 15, 1993
Words:128
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