Printer Friendly

Open shelves and a long peninsula bring old kitchen into today.

Out of a maze of doorways, corridors, and chopped-up spaces, SAnta Barbara architect John Vrtiak created this open kitchen where cookware is within reach and light and work space are abundant. In a double play, he also retained or re-created detailing to keep the remodel at one with the style of this 1918 bungalow.

When work began, all interior partitions were clear redwood board-and-batten paneling, painting white in an earlier attempt to brighten the dark rooms. Vrtiak recycled the paneling and kept the original ceilings wherever possible.

He installed a 10-foot-long work peninsula between dining area and kitchen. Set in the chop-block counter is a gas cooktop with warming oven below. A step away, out of diners' view, are two wall ovens and a niche for spice storage.

On the opposite wall, a shallow new bay window brightens the tiled counter and double sinks, and creates counter space behind them. Above all work areas, canister lights are recessed in the ceiling.

Vrtiak decided against overhead cabinets in favor of open shelves. He also outfitted a 3- by 8-foot pantry at one end of the kitchen with adjustable floor-to-ceiling shelves.
COPYRIGHT 1985 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1985 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Sunset
Date:May 1, 1985
Words:189
Previous Article:Take the sun bridge up to he new bedroom wing and the views.
Next Article:For extra security and wind protection.
Topics:


Related Articles
They started with a dark 1925 kitchen.
Kitchen efficiency in tight quarters.
What's new, what's old? She skillfully blended both.
First step in this kitchen remodel: she enrolled in an owner-builder class.
They turned it into a three-station, many-cooks kitchen.
The old kitchen didn't have space for a table.
They revived the galley kitchen.
A Y-shaped counter was the answer.
They moved, opened up, and reorganized the kitchen.
A cozier kitchen ... with new angles and curves.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters