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One-third of young workers live with their parents.

One in three U.S. workers ages 18 to 35 are living in their parents' homes, the same percentage as live on their own, according to a survey commissioned by the AFL-CIO, which represents 11.5 million workers in the United States.

Only 31 percent of young workers say they make enough money to cover their bills and put some money aside, 22 percentage points fewer than in 1999. Six in 10 do not have enough money saved to cover two months of living expenses, and one in four cannot even pay their monthly bills.

The survey found that jobs, health care and education top the economic agenda for young workers, more than half of whom earn less than $30,000 annually Three in 10 young workers lack health insurance, up from 24 percent 10 years ago, and 79 percent of the uninsured say they don't have coverage because they can't afford it or their employer does not offer it. Nearly 40 percent have put off education or professional development because they can't afford it.

When asked who is most responsible for the economic problems facing the United States, nearly half of young workers place the blame on greed by Wall Street, banks and/or corporate executives.

The survey of 1,156 workers, including 602 young workers, was conducted in late July Young workers comprise roughly 25 percent of current union membership.

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Publication:The Journal of Employee Assistance
Article Type:Brief article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Oct 1, 2009
Words:232
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