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Of rolls, welds and algae.

Even production techniques appear to affect a metal's relative sensitivity to biocorrosion, according to chemist Chitta Ranjan Das of Ravenshaw College in Cuttack, India. In studies where steel samples were immersed in seawater containing two species of blue-green algae ajnd one red alga native to the Sea of Bengal, mild (regular) steel corroded much faster than did stainless steel, "cold-rolled metals corroded much faster than hot-rolled samples," Das reports. Though all the metals succumbed to corrosion in the control environment -- seawater without algae--they did so far more slowly.

In all metals, corrosion first occurred at welds. And again, Das says, how a weld had been made appeared to affect vulnerability, "with gas-welded samples corroding much faster than electrical arc-welded samples."
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Title Annotation:biocorrosion
Publication:Science News
Date:Jul 20, 1985
Words:120
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