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Not Your Average Anti-War Lefty

That's the case Jim Sleeper tries to make here and here.

He cites "Calvinist currents of public obligation and individual conscience" in Lamont country and finds a correlation in his opposition to the war in Iraq with his uncle Thomas W. Lamont Thomas William Lamont, Jr. (September 30 1870 – February 2 1948) was an American banker.

Lamont was born in Claverack, New York. He graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1888 and earned his degree from Harvard University in 1892.
 II's support of American involvement in WWII WWII
abbr.
World War II


WWII World War Two
. As a 17-year-old Exeter student, "Tommy" Lamont spoke out against European Fascism and argued that Americans had a responsibility to stamp it out. He saw WWII as a "Good Fight" (and he died fighting it.) According to according to
prep.
1. As stated or indicated by; on the authority of: according to historians.

2. In keeping with: according to instructions.

3.
 Sleeper, the War in Iraq is no such thing.

"Had Tommy survived, he'd be 82 years old now, and had he opposed the Iraq war in any highly public way, conservative political operatives and their writerly writ·er·ly  
adj.
Of, relating to, characteristic of, or befitting a writer: "set a standard of writerly craft for that...well-wrought magazine" Newsweek. 
 fellow travelers and apologists would be sliming him as shamelessly as they did such veterans as John Kerry, Max Cleland, John Murtha, and even John McCain."

As for Tommy's nephew Ned:

"He has told anyone who'll listen that he became Lieberman's challenger because he couldn't convince anyone else to make the race. But his courage in doing that reminds me That Reminds Me is a series of programmes broadcast on BBC Radio 4 where someone (usually) connected with comedy talks about their life for thirty minutes in front of a live audience.  of the uncle he never knew: Both have risen to a civic-republican standard which too many others have forsaken for·sake  
tr.v. for·sook , for·sak·en , for·sak·ing, for·sakes
1. To give up (something formerly held dear); renounce: forsook liquor.

2.
."

Joe Lieberman, one would imagine, would argue that his support for the war would make him Thomas Lamont's true intellectual descendant. But there it is.

-- Jason Horowitz
Copyright 2006 The New York Observer
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
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Article Details
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Author:Observer Staff
Publication:The New York Observer
Date:Oct 19, 2006
Words:229
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