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New Video from Modern Manners Appeals to Teens' Self-Absorption to Teach Manners; MTV Director teams with Etiquette Consultant to Encourage Teenage Courtesy.

Business Editors

GAITHERSBURG, Md.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jan. 7, 2004

Modern Manners, the company founded by etiquette consultant Christine Chen, today released the first in a series of fictional videos teaching manners and courtesy to teenagers. The Contest, the first video, follows 4 teenagers on a double-date while subtly showing that good manners can help teens get the attention they want from each other.

Chen, a formally-trained model, collaborated with Terrence Michael, producer of MTV's "Duets," to produce the 40-minute video teaching courtesy, but with a twist. The duo used teenagers' own self-interest to craft their message. "While most teens think only about themselves and are unaware of how their behavior affects others," said Chen, "they are also unusually sensitive to any perceived slights. That was our opening," she said.

Chen and Michael realized that connecting courteous behavior to better jobs or lifestyles wouldn't work, given most teens' short planning horizon. "We needed a way to show that better manners had an immediate pay-off," said Chen. "For teens that means relationships, so we built the video around the behaviors of asking for and going on a date."

Michael recruited singer-songwriter Jaffe for the video. Winning a radio contest to meet Jaffe, one of the teens must then invite the others. The story follows the two couples dining out, meeting Jaffe, and watching his latest video.

"Manners and etiquette today are not about extending your pinkie while sipping tea," insists Chen, "but about showing respect for others - and yourself."

The Contest - A Video of Social Skills for Teens is available for $19.95 (+ S&H) from Amazon.com or from Modern Manners at www.modernmanners.net.

About Christine Chen

Christine Chen is the director of Modern Manners, a consulting firm helping children, teens, and young adults develop social skills to develop self-confidence, build self-esteem, and encourage respect for others. She has conducted programs for private and public schools, taught workshops, and lectured at teacher conventions and parent groups. She has been featured in Families Magazine, The Gazette, and The Washington Times. She received training and certification from The Protocol School of Washington. For more information: www.modernmanners.net or call 301.580.7780.
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Publication:Business Wire
Date:Jan 7, 2004
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