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NEWS LITES : KING HELPS THOSE WHO HELPED HIM.

Stephen King's charity is donating $40,000 to help buy a new ambulance for a rescue service that came to the novelist's aid this summer.

It was just the latest in a string of high-priced thank-yous the horror writer has sent since he was hit by a van as he walked along a rural road near his home in Lovell, Maine.

King earlier announced he would give $100,000 each to Central Maine Medical Center and Northern Cumberland Memorial Hospital in Bridgton - the two hospitals where he was treated.

The Stoneham Rescue Service, the first to reach King, has been struggling to raise money for a new ambulance for nearly a year.

Miss America raises diabetes awareness

Miss America 1999 Nicole Johnson will continue to raise awareness for diabetes as a spokeswoman for Sylmar-based MiniMed Inc., it was announced Friday.

Johnson, a diabetic herself, has addressed doctors and patients during her reign with her ``Diabetes: Unmasking the Hidden Killer'' campaign. It emphasizes the importance of education, early diagnosis and recognizing effective treatments for the disease.

Johnson began therapy with MiniMed's external insulin pump more than two years ago, replacing her regimen of four to six insulin injections a day.

Brinkley had family breast cancer scare

Model Christie Brinkley says her own breast cancer scare inspired the introduction she wrote to a new children's book about families facing breast cancer.

``Both my mom and myself had scares, and thank goodness, neither of us had cancer. But those two incidents gave me just a little teeny glimpse of what it's like to have the fear and the rush of emotions,'' Brinkley told The Associated Press this week.

The book addresses those fears - particularly the children's fears - and explains breast cancer through cute illustrations and in words children can understand, Brinkley said.

``Kids Talk'' is a free book from the Susan G. Komen Foundation designed for children 10 and under. It was written by Laura Numeroff, author of ``If You Give a Mouse A Cookie,'' and Dr. Wendy Harpham, who has written several cancer guides.

Copies are available by calling (800) IM-AWARE.

Publisher does not suffer dining fools

Alain Gayot, publisher of a series of city restaurant guides, says that when he combines a meal and an interview with a prospective critic, the candidate gets an automatic turn-down for several offenses. As listed in the Wall Street Journal:

Mishandling the dinner fork, ordering the same meal as Gayot, ``devouring the breadbasket before the entree is served,'' ordering meat well done, and ordering Perrier, which the publisher thinks ``is only appropriate as an aperitif before dinner.''

OFFBEAT: Woman subscribing to jail time

If someone got Penny Page angry, she signed them up for a magazine subscription - or a hundred. A judge sent her to jail for two months on forgery charges. Page, 46, of Painesville, Ohio, sent a total of 350 magazine subscriptions to a job counselor, a landlord and a neighbor. She pleaded guilty last month to four felony counts of forgery for signing her enemies' names on subscriptions.

``I don't think you realize the gravity of the situation,'' Judge Paul Mitrovich said Wednesday.

Mitrovich also placed her on probation for three years and ordered her to take an anger management class.

Survivor buys Tour champ's jersey

A testicular cancer survivor has become the new owner of the yellow jersey Lance Armstrong won as Tour de France champion.

Blaine Rollins of Denver won Armstrong's jersey with a bid of $20,500 in an Internet auction that lasted 22 days, the same duration as the famous race. The auction benefited the Lance Armstrong Foundation, which is dedicated to fighting urological cancer.

Rollins, 32, was diagnosed with testicular cancer in April 1998 and recovered after surgery and chemotherapy one month later.

``I was interested in the jersey because I was inspired by Lance's recovery and attempt to rejoin cycling after what he had been through,'' Rollins said. ``I am excited now to have a piece of one of the most inspiring sporting achievements of my time.''

Armstrong, 27, learned in 1996 that he had testicular cancer, which spread to his bones and brain. He underwent aggressive chemotherapy and three operations, and in February 1997 was cancer-free. In July, Armstrong became the second American to win the Tour de France.

OVERHEARD

``We're giving away a million dollars, but we're giving people a multimillion-dollar experience. It'll be like living in a National Geographic special.''

- Mark Burnett

about CBS' show ``Survivor.''

CAPTION(S):

3 Photos

Photo: (1) KEEP ON ROLLING

Cyclist Lance Armstrong, left, hands over his Tour de France victory jersey to Blaine Rollins.

(2) KING

(3) BRINKLEY
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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Oct 9, 1999
Words:771
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