Printer Friendly

NEWS LITE : WHISKEY, DIMES IN SINATRA TOMB.

Frank Sinatra was buried with some of his favorite things: a bottle of Jack Daniels whiskey, a pack of Camels, a Zippo lighter and 10 dimes.

Daughter Tina Sinatra said carrying the dimes dated back to the 1963 kidnapping of her brother, when her father wanted to make sure he always had pay phone change.

``I think it came from Frankie's kidnapping, maybe before,'' she said on CNN's ``Larry King Live.'' ``He never wanted to get caught not able to make a phone call. He always carried 10 dimes.''

She placed the dimes in his pocket. Her sister, Nancy, put the bottle of whiskey in Sinatra's pocket and someone else slipped in the cigarettes and lighter.

Sinatra, 82, died May 14 of a heart attack. He was buried last week, his pockets full of memories.

``We really wanted him to have a big send-off,'' Tina Sinatra said.

Hope's birthplace for sale in London

Bob Hope's birthplace isn't in the posh part of London. It doesn't even have an indoor toilet. So a modest price tag shouldn't be taken as an insult.

The rundown three-bedroom house in south London where Hope was born in 1903 is up for sale with an asking price of 86,000 pounds, which equals about $140,000.

``Houses around the area normally go for about 95,000 pounds ($155,000) but this needs a lot of modernization,'' said real estate agent Paul Harrison.

Since it went on the market two weeks ago, a few people have come to see the house on Craigton Road in the leafy residential neighborhood of Eltham. But there's been only one offer, which hasn't been accepted because it was too low.

Hope, who will turn 95 on Friday, spent the first four years of his life in Eltham, where his mother worked as a maid and his father as a stonemason. The family then moved to the United States.

Glenn's supporters want cereal tribute

He's no athlete, but astronaut-turned-politician-turned-astronaut-again John Glenn deserves to be on a cereal box, at least according to his home state fans.

Ohio's congressional delegation petitioned the maker of Wheaties to put a picture of the U.S. senator on the cereal box. General Mills said it would consider the request.

The 77-year-old Glenn, who's retiring from the Senate this year, is scheduled to make a space shuttle flight in October to test how older people fare in space. He said he was honored by the request, but joked, ``Considering my age, you'd think they'd want to put my face on a bottle of Geritol.''

Glenn was a decorated military flier who became the first American to orbit Earth. He went on to a long political career. General Mills said only athletes have graced Wheaties boxes since the practice began in 1958.

Arena demolition leaves Boston monkey mystery

Boston Garden lore took on another odd chapter - even after the venerable arena's demolition - with the discovery of monkey bones amid the rubble.

Said to house gremlins who plagued visiting basketball teams, the former home of the Boston Celtics built in 1928 was dreaded for problems real and imaginary, but there were never reports of a resident monkey.

The mysterious remains found in the wreckage last week prompted demolition workers to pause for a moment of silence.

``The Celtics might have to change their mascot,'' said former Garden director Larry Moulter. ``This obviously was a true fan.''

Visiting teams over the years complained about dead spots in the Garden's famed parquet floor and perceived slights like the occasional lack of hot water in the showers, but none ever mentioned a rogue monkey swinging off the backboard to swat away jump shots.

Officials have no idea where the monkey might have come from.

The remains didn't look old enough to be from the great monkey escape of 1936, when Frank Buck's ``Bring 'Em Back Alive'' animal show nearly lost a passel of monkeys during the show. And besides, all those feisty critters supposedly were rounded up.

A check with Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey didn't turn up any leads either, despite the fact the circus performed at Boston Garden in 1994.

And although monkeys were part of an old ``Wizard of Oz'' show at the Garden, none of the ones dressed up in wings was reported to have flown the coop.

Italian team sets new record for pizza making in 12 hours

It worked out to one pizza every six seconds: a bid by four Italian bakers in Forli, Italy, to set a new world record that produced 6,940 pies in 12 hours.

Italian television said Friday night's feat might even secure Dovilio Nardi, Michele Accetta, Nicola and Franco Grittani a place in the Guinness Book of World Records, although the latest edition doesn't list a pizza-making speed record.

The four put on a show, joking and clowning as they transformed a ton of flour, 300 quarts of water, 1,540 pounds of tomatoes and a ton of mozzarella cheese into steaming pizzas from noon to midnight.

Thousands of people gathered in the Piazza Saffi in this town in northern Italy near Bologna to help clean up the mess by eating free pizza; retirement homes and convents also got free dinners.

Wilson names actor to state Indian culture board

Actor Edward Albert may have been killed off from his daytime soap job, but he got another one - although nonpaying - thanks to Gov. Pete Wilson.

Wilson this past week appointed the actor-activist to the state's Native American Heritage Commission, which works to identify and protect American Indian burial sites and cultural resources.

``It's certainly an honor and also a challenge,'' Albert said. ``Working with native peoples here in California is a road that I've walked my whole life.''

The 46-year-old Malibu resident is the founder and chairman of that city's Native American Task Force, which does work similar work to the state commission's with the area's original inhabitants, the Chumash Indians.

His appointment to the commission, like all appointments, is subject to state Senate confirmation.

The television and feature-film actor wrapped up a role last month on ABC's ``Port Charles'' after his devilish character, Dr. Bennett Devlin, was murdered.

Albert, the son of ``Green Acres'' star Eddie Albert, also is lending his vocal talent to a coming Steven Spielberg-produced TV animation series, ``Invasion America.''

CAPTION(S):

2 Photos

PHOTO (1) `I'd like to thank the Academy . . .'

A newly commissioned Navy officer leaps in joy after receiving his diploma Saturday from President Clinton, right, during graduation ceremonies at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md.

Roberto Borea/Associated Press

(2) GLENN
COPYRIGHT 1998 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1998, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:May 24, 1998
Words:1100
Previous Article:ROBERT W. MORGAN, L.A. RADIO HOST.
Next Article:L.A. BRIEFS : WOMAN APPARENTLY FALLS TO HER DEATH.


Related Articles
NEWS LITE : SINATRA IGNORING TABLOID HEARSAY.
NEWS LITE : JAILED TEACHER SAYS SHE, BOY WERE PROLIFIC IN PREVIOUS LIFE.
NEWS LITE : KUDROW: NO ENVY AMONG `FRIENDS'.
FRANK SINATRA; PORTRAIT OF A LEGEND.
NEWS LITE : HOMETOWN SINGS PRAISES OF FAVORITE SON.
NEWS LITE : $167,000 RAISED IN SINGER'S NAME.
NEWS LITE : `SEX' SERIES HAS ACTRESS NERVOUS.
NEWS LITE : BROWN VISITS SOUL GREAT'S HOMETOWN.
NEWS LITE : CIGARETTE CHARACTER INSPIRES TEEN-AGE VERSION.
NEWS LITE : MADONNA LEADS NOMINEES FOR MTV'S MUSIC AWARDS.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters