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NEW YORK STATE FUNDS TO SUPPORT HIGH-TECH ACTIVITIES; CORNELL UNIVERSITY FIRST TO INSTALL IBM'S NEW PARALLEL SUPERCOMPUTER

 ITHACA, N.Y., April 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Cornell University and IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced that the Cornell Theory Center is the first customer to install IBM's new RISC-based, parallel supercomputer. The IBM Scalable POWERparallel System(A) (SP1(A)) which was introduced in February will be used by scientists and engineers nationwide to do research in a wide variety of disciplines - at gigaflops(B) speed.
 After Cornell Theory Center (CTC) staff gain expertise with the new 64-processor, general-purpose supercomputer, they will train members of the scientific and technical community on how to use the SP1 via high- speed networks -- while exploring Grand Challenge problems. These problems have been identified by the federal government as vital to the nation's future; finding solutions to the specific challenges requires significant, high-performance computational capabilities.
 "We now have a new scalable, parallel environment in which scientists can experiment with advanced technologies," said Malvin H. Kalos, director of the Cornell Theory Center. "By using the SP1 and widely promoting the idea of RISC-based parallelism, we are training a whole new generation of supercomputer users."
 The new system was purchased with a $12.3 million grant from the New York State Urban Development Corporation. The funds have been allocated to Cornell for high-performance computing technology research. Cornell will use a portion of this funding to purchase the SP1 and follow-on systems from IBM.
 "This kind of high-technology investment is important to all of us," Governor Cuomo said. "Such partnerships between business, higher education and government will advance research today and create jobs tomorrow."
 The Theory Center also plans to acquire IBM's next generation of scalable, parallel systems in 1994 with a combination of state, federal and corporate funds. Proposed acquisitions include a system with up to 512-processors, capable of performing at speeds exceeding 100 gigaflops. Similar to the SP1 already installed at Cornell, the follow-on system will have serial, batch and parallel computing capabilities.
 "We are delighted with the way Cornell has embraced the SP1," said Irving Wladawsky-Berger, general manager, IBM Power Parallel Systems. "The IBM/Cornell relationship combines the best of our joint resources -- cost-effective technologies, advanced applications and high- performance computing expertise. This is only the beginning of what promises to be incredibly exciting times for the future of parallel computing."
 In November of 1992, IBM and Cornell announced a partnership to develop scientific and technical applications for the new supercomputer. Specific Grand Challenge application areas this partnership is targeting include: fluid dynamics, plasma physics, ground water and air pollution analysis, rational drug design, ozone mapping, and seismic analysis.
 Specifically, drug design researchers will soon be able to utilize the high performance computing power of the SP1 to model complex molecules like the genetic material of the HIV virus. New drugs would then be designed to interfere with the deadly virus' capability to live or reproduce.
 The Cornell Theory Center is one of four national supercomputing centers supported by the NSF. The CTC also receives funding from other federal agencies, as well as New York State, IBM and other members of the Center's Corporate Research Institute. New York State provides annual operations support for the Theory Center, in addition to capital equipment funding.
 The SP1 was developed at the IBM Highly Parallel Supercomputing Systems Laboratory (HPSSL) in joint partnership with the IBM Research Division. Established by IBM in February 1992, the HPSSL (Kingston, NY) is dedicated to the design, development and delivery of a series of scalable, parallel high-performance systems, based on IBM's industry- leading RISC System/6000(A) technology. The HPSSL is part of IBM's newly-formed POWER Parallel Systems organization, an internal joint venture which combines resources from the Enterprise Systems line of business and the Advanced Workstation & Systems Division.
 NOTE: (A) Indicates a trademark or registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
 (B) Gigaflops - billions of floating operations per second.
 -0- 4/7/93
 /CONTACT: Marta Decker, 914-642-5467 or Kelly Fitzgerald, TSI, 212-505-9900, both of IBM; or Larry Bernard of Cornell, 607-255-3651/
 (IBM)


CO: International Business Machines Corp. ST: New York IN: CPR SU: PDT

WB -- NY021 -- 3716 04/07/93 10:30 EDT
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Date:Apr 7, 1993
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