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NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE TESTS WIRELESS PUBLIC PHONES IN DOWNTOWN BOSTON

 BOSTON, May 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Hundreds of New England Telephone customers are using pocket-sized cordless public phones to make calls from downtown Boston as part of a two-year trial of Cordless Charge-a-Call(sm) Service.
 Following a successful trial with employees, NET announced today it has recruited some 400 customers to try out the new service using cordless phones similar to those sold in retail stores for use at home or at work.
 The service lets customers make calls from most street corners in the area between the expressway and Boston Common, and from North Station to South Station. Calls can also be made from several terminals at Logan Airport and inside Jordan Marsh downtown.
 Calls are dialed just as they would be from an NET coinless public phone -- as collect, billed to a third party, or with an NET Calling Card -- and at the same rates. There are no additional charges or subscription fees.
 Again, just like the coinless public phone, Cordless Charge-a-Call Service will let customers make calls, but not receive them. However, about 200 of the 400 customers in the trial will have phones with built- in pagers so that they can return pages by just pushing a button. They also can be connected directly to the person paging them by subscribing to Meet Me service, one of several options available from MobileComm, the paging service provider for the trial.
 "We think some of the same people who use cordless phones at their homes or businesses will like the convenience of being able to place calls from downtown Boston on their own cordless sets instead of having to find a public phone," said Alan Murphy, marketing director for the NYNEX (NYSE: NYN) telephone companies.
 NET has installed digital radio base stations inside buildings at major downtown intersections. When a customer places a call, the equipment at the nearest corner relays the call in much the same way as the base station of a cordless home phone.
 The phones will use digital radio technology to connect with the base stations -- not analog radio as used by today's conventional cordless sets -- making calls crystal clear and secure from electronic eavesdropping via scanners.
 The Motorola (NYSE: MOT) cordless phones, which also function as standard cordless phones at home or work, eventually will be sold at a number of area retail stores at prices similar to those of many of the sets available today.
 If the trial is successful, the company will make the service more widely available in Boston and other metropolitan areas.
 -0- 5/5/93
 /CONTACT: John Johnson of New England Telephone, 617-743-3677/


CO: New England Telephone ST: Massachusetts IN: TLS SU: PDT

DJ -- NE009 -- 4875 05/05/93 12:42 EDT
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Date:May 5, 1993
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