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NATIONAL AND LOCAL INDIAN LEADERS DENOUNCE TRUMP ATTEMPT TO USE CONGRESS AS TOOL FOR PERSONAL GAIN

 Cite Trump Bill as Economic Racism
 SAN DIEGO, May 27 /PRNewswire/ -- With thousands of jobs and


hard-won economic independence to protect, the nation's Indian leaders today denounced new legislation, sponsored by states heavily involved in the gambling industry, that would betray Native American sovereignty to benefit developer Donald Trump and gaming industry interests, according to National Indian Gaming Association Vice Chairman Daniel Tucker.
 Nevada Sens. Harry Reid and Richard Bryan and Reps. James Bilbray of Nevada and Robert Toricelli of New Jersey have introduced a new bill that proposes to redefine Indian governance of tribal lands; will reconfigure the National Indian Gaming Commission; and will place a national moratorium on Indian gaming.
 "Many years ago a white man stole Manhattan from the Indians for a few beads," said National Indian Gaming Association Chairman Rick Hill at a Capitol Hill press conference. "Now, another white man from Manhattan has come to take even the measly beads still left to them. This man's name is Donald Trump, and the Gaming Integrity and State Law Enforcement Act of 1993 is written just for him and his friends in Atlantic City and Las Vegas."
 California's tribal leaders, angry over this latest legislative threat, today issued their own statement calling on Congress to reject the Trump bill.
 "Donald Trump has no shame left. He is clearly attempting to use Congress for his empire building at the expense of one of America's poorest minorities," said Tucker, who is also Tribal Chairman of the Sycuan Band of Mission Indians. "Trump would use this new law to deprive tribal governments of their right to control their own land; violate protection established by the U.S. Constitution; and crush the laws that have enabled tribes to break free of welfare dependence.
 "By attempting to re-engineer the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, created by the Congress and governors in 1988, Trump wants the federal and state governments to turn their backs on the Indians and reverse the 1987 Supreme Court decision that promised to protect our rights," said Tucker. "Gaming today represents a $500 billion pie. Private casino owners like Trump and the state lotteries already have more than 90 percent of it locked up. Now Trump wants the small percentage that Indians use to build schools, homes, roads and to fund health clinics, libraries, education and care for the elderly. If Donald Trump is concerned about unfair competition, why doesn't he sue the state lotteries? They rake in more than $200 billion annually."
 "Unlike the profits from big business gaming, Indian gaming pays for community improvement and economic self-sufficiency," said Viejas Band of Mission Indians Tribal Chairman Anthony Pico. The Viejas Band operates a successful gaming center near Alpine, Calif. "Casino owners like Donald Trump use their profits to purchase personal luxuries like private limousines, giant yachts and country estates that are unheard of in Indian country. In the shadows of Trump's own Taj Mahal in Atlantic City are glaring inner city slum conditions and homelessness. Compare this with the housing and employment and new tax revenue generated by Indian gaming. Indian gaming is enabling native American communities to create their own economic independence. We want jobs, not welfare, and the right to govern our own destiny.
 Under the provisions of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, the majority of Indian gaming proceeds are spent on job creation, business development, education, healthcare needs and community improvements. In many states, tribes have been able to reduce both tribal and local surrounding community dependence on welfare assistance.
 "Many of the treaties originally entered into by the federal government with Native American tribes relegated them to usually rural, economically under-developed land with little natural resources," said Mary Ann Andreas, tribal chairwoman for the 1,000-member Morongo Band of Mission Indians located in Banning, Calif. "For many tribes, gaming represents a clean, environmentally responsible, profitable business that provides the kind of attraction that enables us to draw from a broad geographic base. Now, a rich man like Donald Trump is using the states that already have a monopoly on gambling to take away our only form of economic security."
 Barona Band of Mission Indians Tribal Chairman Clifford LaChappa said the Trump legislation represents "an all-out attack on Indian tribes."
 "Congress needs to understand that this is an attempt to eliminate any other alternatives to Las Vegas and Atlantic City," said LaChappa. "The bill amounts to economic racism because it would cut off the flow of economic benefits to thousands of needy people to benefit the greedy few. It is a betrayal of the very agreement that Congress and the states created with the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act." The Barona tribe operates a gaming facility just outside Lakeside, Calif.
 In summary, NIGA leaders said the Trump bill proposes the following:
 -- It would redefine Indian lands and eliminate the rights of tribal governments to govern large portions of their own reservations. This would violate previous treaty rights and 200 years of case law protected by the U.S. Constitution.
 -- It would restructure the National Indian Gaming Commission, thereby imposing state control, not federal control, over Indian gaming activities. This would violate the terms of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.
 -- It would impose a moratorium on any further Class III (Las Vegas-style) gaming. This change would immediately prevent Indian tribes from realizing present operational revenue for their communities while the Trump casinos would continue to generate profits.
 -- It would deny Native American tribes judicial protection of their rights under IGRA. This means the tribes, unlike ordinary American citizens, would have no protection from the courts and could only negotiate with the states. In the last year, it has been the courts who have issued decisions supporting Indian tribes in their struggle to preserve their rights within the states.
 -- The Trump bill would immediately reinstate state criminal jurisdiction over federal criminal jurisdiction. This is also a violation of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.
 -0- 5/27/93
 /CONTACT: Waltona Manion of Waltona Manion & Associates, 619-674-1141/


CO: ST: California IN: CNO SU: LEG

JB-LS -- SD005 -- 3116 05/27/93 16:40 EDT
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