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More of Ngundeng's Prophecies (Part II).

By Gatkuoth Deng August 29,2009 -- I have been encouraged by a lot of email messages flooding my account requesting that I should avail more of Ngundeng's prophesies about Sudan. I have also noticed interest shown by many people who have directly commented under my Part I article entitled, "Some of Ngundeng's Predictions." But let me make a few things clear in response to concerns raised by some of the commentators about Ngundeng as a figure that represents whatever his messages were all about, and my own intention to avail such messages to the readers and the general public. I am a Christian by faith, baptized in the name of Jesus Christ, and I want to make it clear that I will NEVER agree with any body that thinks or believes that Ngundeng is God and may be worshipped as such like God. I will never accept that! To me, he is just a messenger! However I will not also agree with any one who thinks it is not necessary to avail and study what 'REALLY' did this controversial figure, Ngundeng, prophesy about the people of Sudan. Let me try to explain some more on these two points. Even if Ngundeng were to be a real prophet sent by God for the people of South Sudan, prophets are not God to be worshipped. They are just messengers of God to tell to people what exactly God says or directs them to say about such a particular kind of people. This is why prophets like Moses, Isaiah, Ezekiel, Amos, etc, etc, were not worshipped by the people of Israel. But the messages they delivered from God were either rejected (disobeyed) or accepted (obeyed). Ngundeng himself believed in God and predicted the coming of Christianity to South Sudan, which he wholeheartedly believed in when he talked of "Deng Nyang-geer" which translates "God of the Cross." But even if Ngundeng were to be a pretender or a 'devil' as some of the commentators would choose to describe him, it is still good to let us get informed about his messages and study what this 'devil' really prophesied about us! Whether we avoid facing the reality, his messages are unknowingly impacting on our lives as some of them have already been proven to be true and actually occurred. How would we then be sure that they are not from the true one God? The same way prophets of the Old Testament in the Bible used to live and conduct rituals was the same way Ngundeng did his, too. To avoid or run away from knowing Ngundeng's prophesies would be surrender to ignorance. And I expect or advice that our arguments on them should NOT be illogical and emotional arguments that are driven by tribalism and jealousy. Face them with logical argument. I will also expect that some of the commentators are not Northerners who use names of Southerners. If they are there they should be encouraged to use their own true names and participate in the discussions freely. Having said that, I would also be lying to you if I tell you that the interpretations I have provided are 100% correct and believe them in whole. I am not self-convinced either by some of the interpretations, and this is why I write the messages as I hear them directly in Nuer language from the songs in the cassette so that other Nuer readers can correct any mistake. I am also aware that there are many other non-Nuer individuals who speak and write in Nuer and are also familiar with the Ngundeng's predictions. We should judge and individually try to interpret the predictions by how they are said in the songs, and may be not by how they are interpreted by some of the Nuer elders. But I find it more helpful to avail the interpretations by the Nuer elders as a food for thought. Some of the commentators were also concerned and asked questions like why would Ngundeng's prophesies be on politics and not specifically on religions if he were a true prophet of God. To me it is difficult to draw a line between politics and religion when it comes to directives given to prophets by God. They are cross-cutting. I don't understand how one could interpret the directive given to Prophet Moses of the Old Testament by God to bring the children of Israel out from bondage in Egypt. God told the Egyptian King Pharaoh through Moses "Let my people go!" That was a strong political statement! Here is a Prophet, Moses, talking to a King of a sovereign nation and telling him to let his people go and establish their own country in their own land where they would also have a different leader. Was it not politics? What about Joshua whom God told to invade the land of present Palestine and kill even babies and take over the land? Was it not politics of war? What about the slogan by the current church leaders in South Sudan who say, "Let my people choose!" in reference to the upcoming referendum for the people of South Sudan? To think that God and his prophets plus Christian Priests are not politicians is a big mistake! God intends to resolve on every issue affecting his children whether on political, economical, security and social issues, etc. Ngundeng was not sent to preach the Gospel, but to alert the people of South Sudan of the danger ahead of them. This is the reason he might have concentrated on such matters. Elders could recall that he did not only sing the songs of his messages but also explained some of them. Since people of Ngundeng's generation were not smart teachers, they could only succeed in passing the songs to the next generations and forgotten the lectures given to them by Ngundeng about their interpretations. But elders say he could tell them what he meant in plain talking and these were mostly on politics, economics and peace. Ngundeng's religious teachings were based on social life where he was said to be warning people against use of excessive sex, etc. He also taught about peace among tribes. So, if Ngundeng's prophesies concentrated on politics, security and economic prosperity of South Sudan as some say, this could be the very reason for which God sent him to explain in details how the people of South Sudan would suffer because of political and economic oppression and marginalization, and what they could do in order to avoid more suffering. In this case he encouraged peace, unity and economic self-reliance and prophesied for his people to form their own independent South Sudan. Thus, he tried to play a similar role played by Moses to rescue the children of Israel from oppressive Pharoah of Egypt, but time was not ripe in case of South Sudan. In his lifetime, as I stated in my previous Part I article, Ngundeng succeeded to stop raids and bloodshed between Nuer and their neighboring tribes. Are security concerns and peace-making, political and economic destiny of a people only for political leaders to handle or do they involve religious leaders as a cross-cutting responsibility? Coming now to the main topic, I have received a lot of emails asking me to present some of Ngundeng's prophecies even for South Sudan internal affairs and also more of the South-North relations. As I said in my first article on the topic, I am not interested to present to the readers or general public the internal affairs of South Sudan because of their sensitivity and irrelevance to my intended topic. I am more comfortable only in venturing into Ngundeng's prophecies on the general North-South relations. But before I go to present more of the North-South relations, let me present a few of the South Sudan internal affairs, particularly some of the positive and less sensitive ones. And let me refer you to some of the following names which Ngundeng used in his songs which readers may come across in the article. Yang (cow), Luak (byre) and Wec (country), they can all refer to South Sudan as used by Ngundeng. Hok (cattle) and raan (person), naath (people) can all refer to people in his usage. There is a saying in Nuer that "Raan e yang kuoth" meaning "Man or human being is a cow of God." Also Ngundeng used nicknames for himself and for other people he mentioned. For example, Jambiel (colorful), Mac Thok (language grabber), etc. are nicknames he used to describe himself. By Jambiel he likened himself to a beautiful color. People also say he used the name Mac Thok because he could understand languages of strangers. Elders say Ngundeng predicted some of our present leaders. In his songs he talked of a leader called 'Kiir Nyal Diing' who would lead our people. Elders say it is Salva Kiir Mayardit. The name 'Kiir' would match the first name of our current leader, but 'Nyal Diing' is just a nickname describing Kiir. 'Nyal Diing' in Nuer are names of many doted colors, for example like that of a cow and leopard, etc. It simply translates "Kiir of many colours." Ngundeng said this Kiir will one day bring, probably bad news, to his people when he said "Kiir Nyal Dieng be ha juoc lom." Literally translates "Kiir Nyal Diing will bring me messages." But the word 'lom' in Nuer is more of a 'gossip' than just a message or news. And in what form will he bring the news, no body knows. Ngundeng also said "Tik yual kuoth bi mac de bool." This translates "The flames of fire of the God's long bearded man shall be widespread." Some elders say he meant our late hero Dr. John Garang de Mabior in reference to the magnitude and severity of the 21 years of the wide spread civil war in the South which he led. Others think it is also Salva Kiir. Ngundeng also talked of the current South Sudan Vice President, Dr. Riek Machar among other leaders, some of whom are either dead and others alive, and others with names that are not clear to me because of nicknames. Generally in South Sudan internal affairs, Ngundeng, after prophesying a lot of suffering and internal fighting among South Sudanese, he finally predicted a unified South Sudan under a uniting, loving and caring leadership. He predicted a united people of South Sudan, happy and do not recognize themselves on the basis of tribalism or practice of tribalism. It is not yet clear whether this predicted unity is supposed to happen before or after independence. In his songs in Nuer he said, "Cia ben pal gaat ka diaal e nga bi nga ngico, cang ni Ngok bike toang cuare dual ke beri marol; gueth ce jany ke ram kel ce bi yic ni how; jiok nyal yith tung de puar; ci gueth jany ke rol mac ce bi yic ni how; jiok nyal yith tung de puar." It translates: "You have all come together, praying together all my children without bothering to know who is who; even the Ngok will participate in the building (of the nation); don't be afraid of Jalaba's flags; the power has been in one person, but this will not be too confusing for the world (nation?); my colored bull's long horns reach to the skies; the power has lasted long with Jalaba, but will not be too confusing for the world; my colored bull's long horns reach to the skies." Since this sounds like a political statement in regard to the North-South relations, elders recalled Ngundeng's explanations that it may mean unity of the people of South Sudan. They also say that he predicts how powerful or rich South Sudan would be when he likened it to a bull with long horns that reach to the skies. They compared this to a description in the Bible in which God described a once powerful Kingdom of Nebuchadnezzar to a big tree with long branches under which all kinds of birds rest. And again, Ngundeng refers to South Sudan as a cow or in this case as a bull. In economic sense he describes it as a cow that produces milk (resources) and in the sense of political or military power he describes it as a bull with long horns. It also said "Nuer yiene Jang cang loke haa be ngoang e ba dhile guurun." Translation, "Nuer and Dinka, even if you dislike or reject me, I will still be your father some day." It is some times confusing to try to know who Ngundeng refers to when he says 'I', because he seems to represent every body of his choice in South Sudan. Readers will notice that he in the following paragraphs seems to say 'I' as a representative of every thing from God, himself and the leader of the South. He continued to say "gook nyaliep, gook nyaliep cuare kuar kuon ruac Deng rol kene wea (cuor) ka jala ke mac mi riaw how." It translates "Prophets (leaders?); prophets of Nyaliep don't reject the leader; God rules the land with vultures and I am carrying a weapon that lightens the skies." Again, I don't know who he refers to by the name 'Nyaliep' that has prophets (leaders) who he cautioned not to reject the leader. And who is that leader? The elders I asked did not know. In what seems to be his assurances, Ngundeng said "Jal Deng ke mac mi riaw how, chan dial bi ku kaan ke Ngundeng, Ngundeng Bong laar jiak ka laar goy, cuara beera mat keel kene beer roalC*luore cier e bee mo C*e hoo ruac kuar ke nei ti mieng, ca laat caara cu pal ruec." He says "God holds a weapon that lightens the skies (world); all the poor will survive because of Ngundeng; Ngundeng Bong says bad things and also says good things; don't mix my flag with the flag of JalabaC*receive the star from the EastC*.It is because the leader talks to the deaf, who have forgotten the messages of the black (cow)". Again, here he refers to prophesies about South Sudan as prophesies about a black cow. He warned against combining the flag of Jalaba and that of his (South Sudan). It is not clear to elders what he meant by mixing of flags. Some say he might have meant the current GONU and GOSS flags used by Salva Kiir. Others also think that two different flags could simply symbolize his declaration of separation (two separate independent countries). Elders also think that Ngundeng had predicted insecurity incidents in Malakal town, Upper Nile state among other incidents throughout the South. In his songs he said, "Rek Makal chan bi le met leeng, but mai ke wuor, ban toat ni door, ni door eba nguel ka dial thiec, marol mi wan we gaak bi tuok muor thoar." This translates, "The town of Malakal we will not continue to play games against each other; we will spend the whole of winter (season) running; and we will spend the whole of Summer in the wilderness; in the wilderness that I will ask for all my dues; Jalaba if I will get angry with you, your mother's cooking utensils will float." Ngundeng also predicted other violent incidents in some other specific towns or villages he mentioned by names in the South. But some are too sensitive to comment on. In another prophesy which is thought to mean the conflict involving all parts of Sudan, Ngundeng said "Cango wa gaako piny be tee wany wany, be ku wany en piny, be wany mani kany cang, mani kuony cang, cuec de hoa ba wany, cam hoa be wany." "The day I will get angry the land (nation) will be unstable; it will be unstable; it will be unstable in the East, up to the West; south of it will be unstable; north of it will be unstable." Elders also think that there would be a time when Jalaba would fear the South and confine itself to the North when Ngundeng said, "Rol mac ce biet piny ca gueth de luoc e Deng, thiece yang cia mi jiakC*bi gook marol e luoc, tare tet kun dong biaa te kuee te ke toot ti koang ke lia, ce ben han Deng luak jala ke mac mi riaw how." This translates, "Jalaba has quietly confined itself; its power has been reversed by God; if asking for my cow (land) has become something bad; lift up your hands pleading and may be you will have survivors; there are those who rush to meet their death; I have come, the God of the land, holding a weapon that lightens the skies (world). In what elders thought was a situation of an imposed final war on the South that would also be different from the wars fought in the past; Ngundeng also said "Koor e thaar rele rode ci dual ngoang gat gualeen, cieng guari ci duale ngong, nyan nyan koor e kua jol ni wal C*kora col yiene mieth beel." Translation, "The war of last year (before) is different; I am tired of being afraid my step brother; people of my father's land, I am ceasing to get afraid; I have been trying to avoid war for a very long timeC*do you think my war is like eating grain?" In another portion he continued by saying "yoate thony e bi kuake duoth, kathi rodu nhiam Deng ke taath mi boor, ken wii wal bike ku ruac..?." This translates "I will hit the circumcised (Jalaba); and he will leave behind all his properties; Jalaba has come across God who holds a big brand new spear; the ten states will finally be ruled byC*? A "big brand new spear" to elders may mean a type of modern weaponry. Also note that I cut off some of the last sentence because of its sensitivity. He also said, "Ken jiook ka ci kena ngar-ngareC*caa goola yoac mac ci goola de riaw, wec jiath da thiele coah, coah ni coa ranC*gaat ji hook e mo ca ngaai." Translation, "My dogs have played against me; they have dragged my family (nation?) on to fire; my family almost got destroyed; among our trees have no other bones; only the bones of humans; my children, I don't know why." And he continued in another portion that "Mi waa rode thaac luak ba gaat ka ciolC*ba gaat ka col I bia luaak bi rol kon ben jiek ni rey luak, e luak Deang yith puar." Translation, "When I reach (control) all the corners of my luak (South Sudan) I will call my children to come so that Jalaba will get us in our land; let the Luak reach to the skies." Another one says, "Ba yioku yiath, ba yioku yiath luak Ngundeng cie jen kuaa Nguene, me kua nguen bia kule we ni yicia widun guandong." It says, "I will use your weapons, I will use your weapons because Ngundeng's nation has been envied; where will you go as it has been envied; return to God as the last choice." Ngundeng also predicted the return of his dang (rod), which was taken to South Sudan from Great Britain after 80 years, when he said in his song, "Mi ciaa thuok ke ruac noonge dang, en mac thok eni nyuura." This translates, "If you have finished with the talks (debates) bring my rod (dang); I, the language grabber, am still seated." Elders say the timing of return of Ngundeng's rod was in accordance with his prediction. Some say the talks could mean the Naivasha peace talks in Kenya. Others think it means the current debates going on in the implementation of the CPA. But they all agree that the return of dang symbolizes the return of power which they said was lost since 1920s, or acquisition of modern weaponry. This, like others, is also a food for thought. He also said "Kuar dang nguan ngot ni joor jal ke jur ti kur ke bathdor C*bi wang cuec de a cang kene pay." It translates "Four leaders are yet to come with hundreds and thousands of strangers (forces)C*on my right eye will be sun and moon." Elders think that these hundreds and thousands of strangers that are yet to come may mean foreign forces of aggression against South Sudan by about four countries. But Ngundeng said they would also be defeated. Again, this is a food for thought. Another prophesy which elders thing is directly related to the people of Southern Blue Nile is when Ngundeng said in his songs "Lare Funj ci maar e dan daak, kua lar Funj, lare je co nyal kua lat ke leer." It says "Tell the Funj that the past relations have ended; tell Funj, tell the son-in-law; continue to discuss it over." This to elders is also confusing. Some think the prophesy talks of ending past relations between Funj and Jalaba or may be ending relations between Funj and South Sudan. And who is the 'son-in-law' in this case, is also confusing. And what does it mean to say 'continue to talk it over?' I have not come across any thing that mentions Nuba Mountains or its people. It could be in a different tape. Or I might have not understood that he meant Nuba Mountains if he used some kind of a nickname for the region. These are again some of the songs I noted. I could not present most of them. The whole cassette can nearly take a hundred pages if I were to transcribe it all. The songs were not recorded directly from the mouth of Ngundeng himself for those of you who need some clarity. There was no tape recorder in Nuerland, at least during Ngundeng's lifetime. But those who were with him passed the message in form of songs which were easily remembered and recorded after the benefit of the tape recorder technology reached the Nuerland. My cassette was recorded in 1988 by a different fellow who went to Wec Deang (Lou-Nuer) and recorded it from a grandson of Ngundeng Bong. I then recorded it from him in 1992. But it is always the same even if you record it from different Nuer elders in Unity, Upper Nile and Jonglei states. They may differ in the order of the songs' tracks, but the songs will remain the same. I understand that it is not an easy thing to try to correctly interpret what Ngundeng really said about Sudan. Even Nuer elders continue to struggle to find the correct interpretations. This is the reason they prefer to wait for their occurrence to just fit them into things that have already passed and getting to pass. For example, if you asked a Nuer elder just in 1988, the time my cassette was originally recorded, he would not explain to you what Ngundeng meant by "Wii Wal" (ten states). He would just get confused because by then there were only three regions of Equatoria, Bahr el Ghazal and Upper Nile in the South in 1988. But after the present government of Omer el Bashir divided the South into ten states in 1993, elders then rushed to confirm that these were the ten states Ngundeng predicted. The tragic incident I heard from elders talking about it before it happened, and I am sorry to mention it, was the tragic death of our late hero Dr. John Garang de Mabior. I heard about his predicted fate by Ngundeng from about three different elders. One told me about it since 1988 that there was something Ngundeng said about Dr. Garang. Again after he signed the CPA, and before he could take oath of office as First Vice President of Sudan and President of the Government of Southern Sudan, two other elders told me that unless Ngundeng was wrong in his prophesies, Dr. Garang would not live longer after entering Khartoum. When I heard about his death over the CNN I felt shocked and afraid. I couldn't believe it. I couldn't believe that what the elders told me could come true. Plus the ten states which he predicted and came true, I came to realize that Ngundeng could be right in his prophesies. He might have been empowered with vision by God to tell us in black or white what were the things God said were going to happen to us as the people of God in South Sudan and Sudan as a whole. This could be the reason why he claimed to have been given "God's eye glasses." I think he meant he was empowered with God's vision to enable him see into the future with accuracy. However, I still stand with my word that I would NEVER agree with any body who tries to make people believe that Ngundeng is God that can be worshipped. No, that can be a big mistake; even Ngundeng himself would have opposed it. To me, he was simply a prophet or messenger of God; as simple as that. The author, who lives in USA, can be reached at: gatkuothlam@yahoo.com

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Publication:Sudan Tribune (Sudan)
Date:Aug 31, 2009
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