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McDONNELL DOUGLAS SLAM MISSILE COMPLETES FIRST NIGHT TEST

 ST. LOUIS, Oct. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Navy successfully conducted a night flight test of the Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM) on Sept. 23 at the Pacific Missile Test Center off the coast of California.
 To date, more than 30 SLAMs have been launched, and this marked the fifth firing of the improved version. Built by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, the upgraded version of SLAM includes improvements to the flight software, launch system and target designation capability. In addition, the new software incorporates a feature called "energy management guidance," which increases the allowable altitude and ambient temperature for SLAM flights.
 The SLAM, which was preprogrammed with two waypoints, target location and other mission data prior to aircraft takeoff, was launched by an F/A-18 aircraft and controlled by a second F/A-18 equipped with a Walleye data link.
 The SLAM flew autonomously using a global positioning system (GPS) for precise midcourse navigation accuracy. GPS midcourse positioning greatly enhanced target acquisition by pointing the missile's Maverick infrared seeker directly at the target. When the infrared imaging seeker was turned on at the pre-programmed time, the target was within the seeker's field of view.
 Using SLAM's man-in-the-loop guidance system, the pilot then identified and locked onto the target -- a simulated building complex on San Nicolas Island -- and the missile then guided itself to a direct hit.
 SLAM, a derivative of the McDonnell Douglas Harpoon anti-ship missile system, allows Navy aircraft to maintain a safe distance from enemy defenses while attacking high-value targets with precision accuracy.
 SLAM combines the airframe, propulsion and control systems of the Harpoon with a new guidance system composed of a Maverick infrared imaging seeker, a Walleye data link and a GPS receiver/processor.
 During operation, the seeker video is transmitted to the control aircraft; the operator views the image, recognizes the target, and selects a specific aimpoint on the target. Aimpoint control provides precision strike capability while minimizing collateral damage to surrounding civilian areas.
 SLAM is deployed from land-based and carrier-based attack aircraft and can be adapted for ship launch. Its launch range is in excess of 50 nautical miles, but can be controlled from even greater ranges.
 SLAM was used effectively during Operation Desert Storm even though it had not completed the operational evaluation testing phase of the program.
 After only a 22-month development program, McDonnell Douglas delivered the first SLAM in November 1988. SLAM is manufactured by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace in St. Charles, Mo.
 -0- 10/13/93
 /CONTACT: Barbara Huddleston, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, 314-234-2689/


CO: McDonnell Douglas Aerospace ST: Missouri, California IN: ARO SU:

LM-EH -- LA022 -- 1705 10/13/93 13:01 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 13, 1993
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