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MGM'S '2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY' HITS 25TH ORBIT

 CULVER CITY, Calif., March 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Twenty-five years ago, movie audiences watched a bone hurled into the sky by a prehistoric man metamorphose into a spinning space station. These opening scenes of Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey" realized the transformation of the science fiction movie genre as much as they symbolized the modernization of man.
 The Academy Award-winning "2001: A Space Odyssey" has embarked on its 25th anniversary celebration, beginning with its return to Los Angeles' Cinerama Dome, where it was first seen in 1968. The movie begins a limited seven-day engagement on Friday, March 19, and will be shown in 70mm, 6-track stereophonic sound.
 In addition, a completely re-mastered, special anniversary edition of "2001: A Space Odyssey" video and laserdisc will be released this summer. The package will include art and extended liner notes on the film.
 Directed by Kubrick, who also wrote the screenplay with Arthur C. Clarke, "2001: A Space Odyssey" opened in 1968 to widespread critical and audience acclaim. Instantly recognized as a landmark achievement in filmmaking, it went on to win an Oscar for Best Special Effects. Its final scenes were so stunningly bizarre that it fostered analysis and debate that continue to this day. Initial doubts that its cost would be recouped were nullified by the cumulative effect at the box office and an estimated $50 million in rentals. Years later, it is still drawing large theater audiences at reissues around the world.
 It has withstood the test of time in other areas as well. Credited with legitimizing and raising the level of the science fiction movie genre, technically as well as artistically, "2001: A Space Odyssey" would foster the later accomplishments of such sci-fi moviemakers as George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. It established a new criterion for space adventures: one that did not demand death rays and monsters, but rather the peaceful exploration of man's final frontier.
 Aspects of the film also became part of the vernacular -- permanent and instantly recognizable references to its most powerful moments: the voice of HAL, the computer (Douglas Rain), gently admonishing Keir Dullea's Dave as he slowly disengages him is still parodied in advertising and other media today; and the theme song, "Thus Spake Zarathustra" by Richard Strauss, has become a theme song for real-life space exploration.
 Other planned celebrations for the 25th anniversary of this milestone film include an A.F.I. screening of the picture in Washington in April and special limited engagements in theaters nationwide.
 -0- 3/19/93
 /CONTACT: Nancy Willen of MGM, 310-280-6168/


CO: Metro Goldwyn Mayer ST: California IN: ENT SU:

BP-JL -- LA029 -- 8133 03/19/93 19:58 EST
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Date:Mar 19, 1993
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