Printer Friendly

MANUFACTURERS SAY LABELING BILL WON'T HELP CONSUMERS

 MANUFACTURERS SAY LABELING BILL WON'T HELP CONSUMERS
 WASHINGTON, June 24 /PRNewswire/ -- Proposed labeling legislation


that would require automakers to indicate what country a vehicle's parts come from is a prescription for confusion, Association of International Automobile Manufacturers (AIAM) Chairman Jack Reilly said today.
 "All of the automakers in the world, including domestic manufacturers, buy parts from all over the world," said Reilly, who is also chairman of American Isuzu Motors, Inc. "This measure ignores reality by failing to acknowledge that motor vehicle manufacturing has become an international activity."
 Under the American Automobile Labeling Act of 1992, all automobiles sold in the United States would include a label which identifies the percentage of parts and assembly labor which originates in the United States, as well as any country where one- third of the parts originate. Percentages would be rounded off to the nearest 10 percent.
 Reilly maintains, however, that there are major problems associated with this bill. "For example," said Reilly, "it places heavy emphasis on the origin of 'parts,' but does not state exactly what is considered an automobile part. Do you count the alternator as one part from one country, or, do you treat the wire, the housing, the bearings, and the bolts as separate parts?"
 Reilly added that there are already several different schemes in federal law to calculate U.S. content, none of which has been particularly informative. "Trying to identify foreign parts in a car overlooks the normal commercial practice in the automobile manufacturing industry," said Reilly. "Rather than helping American consumers to determine the U.S. content of their cars, this new legislation will most likely cause considerable consumer confusion."
 "Congress needs to accept the fact that internationalization of the automobile manufacturing industry benefits American consumers," concluded Reilly. "Without internationalization, these same consumers would be faced with lower quality vehicles, higher prices and fewer choices."
 -0- 6/24/92
 /CONTACT: Charles Lockwood of the Association of International Automobile Manufacturers, 703-525-7788/ CO: Association of International Automobile Manufacturers, Inc. ST: District of Columbia IN: AUT SU: LEG


DC -- DC032 -- 3492 06/24/92 17:30 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jun 24, 1992
Words:349
Previous Article:THOMAS D. GIBSON NAMED CHAIRMAN OF MONTCLAIR SAVINGS BANK
Next Article:COORS LIGHTS UP LINCOLNFEST WITH SILVER BULLET SKYSHOW; EMPHASIS PLACED ON DRINKING SAFELY
Topics:


Related Articles
JUST SAY 'MOO' TO MONSANTO, SAYS STONYFIELD FARM
Federal Biotechnology Review Strengthened With White House Plan.
Mandatory Biotech Labels Imply Safety Concerns, Raise Trade Barriers, Says GMA.
The biotech battle looms large.
Senate Agriculture Committee Approves Nationally Uniform Labeling Standards.
Information overload: food labels and signs can provide valuable information to consumers. But how much is too much? (Washington Perspective).
Branding store brands: store-branded products were once thought of as second-best alternatives to national manufacturers' items, but they are quickly...
Cigarette gag: smokes and speech.
Senate bill would mandate country-of-origin labeling for dairy products.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters