Printer Friendly

Lighten up: turning old stencils into art.

Atlanta artist Theron Colucci loves working with trash. Give him old solder stencils and components, and his passion for providing "the world a compelling visual representation of the cutting edge technology that surrounds us" shines through, so to speak.

A 17-year veteran of the electronics industry, Colucci has been reforming used stencils into creative artworks such as lamps for almost two years. After a few struggles initially trying to find a way to form and bend the stainless steel into a workable configuration, he discovered the need for a basic sheet metal brake and an industrial sheet metal cutter.

"I actually started my first lampshade after going to Home Depot and studying the way that stovepipe was joined," said Colucci. "After a few trial and error attempts, I, quite by accident, found an ideal way to join the ends of the foils together in a way that gives a very clean, smooth appearance. I now use that bend for every lampshade I create."

His creations usually take five to six hours to complete and involve making the lampshade, assembling the basic lamp hardware and designing and casting the liquid plastic bases. A favorite lamp is "High Tech Victorian." "The cast plastic base on this lamp was made from thousands of chip resistors, inductors and capacitors and is a depiction of a flower," stated Colucci. "It is matched to an oval-shaped shade and is reminiscent of the design of lamps from, of course, the Victorian Era."

Sources for stencil have not proved problematic so far, as his stencil benefactors range from electronics manufacturing services (EMS) providers to stencil manufacturers. And, although lead is a primary concern for him when working with the used stencils, he meticulously cleans every stencil with alcohol and ammonia-based cleaners.

Continually exploring the recyling of other electronics materials into art, Colucci is currently creating a table from parts taken from an old chip shooter. "I take great satisfaction knowing that most of my materials are recycled," stated Colucci.

Colucci's artwork may be viewed at Eclectic-Electric's web site, www.electric.com, and he may be contacted at tkcolucci@ earthlink.net.
COPYRIGHT 2003 UP Media Group, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2003, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:artists Theron Colucci; Industry News
Author:Hamburg, Lisa
Publication:Circuits Assembly
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Feb 1, 2003
Words:352
Previous Article:EMS program managers certified.
Next Article:IBM, Camstar form alliance.
Topics:


Related Articles
Boy in the Hood.
James Rosenquist Master Pieces.
Felix Gonzalez-Torres.
ENCAUSTIC LETTERS & NUMBERS Middle School.
Matisse mania madness.
ARTIST ENDS 52-YEAR LULL WORK USES RARE STENCIL TECHNIQUE.
School mascot artistically interpreted. (High School).
VALLEY ARTISTS COOK UP ANNUAL FEAST FOR EYES.
HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS THE SANTA CLARITA ARTISTS ASSOCIATION TRANSFORMS NEWHALL HOUSE INTO GALLERY.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters