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Life Sciences Discovery Fund Awards Health Research Program Grants.



SEATTLE -- The Life Sciences Discovery Fund (LSDF LSDF Least Significant Digit First
LSDF Local Spin Density Functional
) today announced its latest grant recipients. Four Washington State-based research organizations will receive life sciences program grants totaling more than $18 million. The newly-funded health research initiatives will focus on advancing vaccine development, improving the potential of cardiac resuscitation resuscitation /re·sus·ci·ta·tion/ (-sus?i-ta´shun) restoration to life of one apparently dead.

cardiopulmonary resuscitation
 technology, improving the delivery of mental health and substance abuse services in rural communities, and developing highly-targeted intracellular drug delivery mechanisms. (See Backgrounder Information).

The Life Sciences Discovery Fund awardees are: Lawrence Corey Lawrence Corey (b. February 14, 1947), Professor of Medicine and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Washington, is an American physician-scientist and an internationally recognized expert on infectious diseases. , Fred Hutchinson
This article is about Fred Hutchinson, the American baseball player and manager. For the medical institution established by his brother in his memory, see Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.
 Cancer Research Center; Thomas Rea, Seattle & King County (Washington) Department of Public Health; John Roll, Washington State University Washington State University, at Pullman; land-grant and state supported; chartered 1890, opened 1892 as an agriculture college. From 1905 to 1959 it was the State College of Washington. ; and Patrick Stayton, University of Washington.

"The four new Life Sciences Discovery Fund grant recipients represent the breadth and depth of life sciences research--from accelerating vaccine development to targeting better drug delivery methods inside human cells, to studying point-of-care resuscitation technology, and to reaching out to rural, underserved populations to improve mental health and substance abuse services. We are proud to award the LSDF program grants to such valuable scientific and public health research endeavors," said Executive Director Lee Huntsman.

The grantees were selected by the Life Sciences Discovery Fund Board of Trustees board of trustees Politics The posse of thugs who oversee an institution's administration. See Board of directors.  from among 29 proposals that were evaluated by national experts convened by the American Association for the Advancement of Science American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), private organization devoted to furthering the work of scientists and improving the effectiveness of science in the promotion of human welfare. . In a rigorous competitive process the proposals were weighted on their scientific merits and their abilities to utilize this funding to provide statewide economic returns, to build a competitive life sciences industry, and to advance health care for Washingtonians.

Funding for the LSDF grant competitions comes from Washington's allocation of bonus payments under the Master Tobacco Settlement, revenues arising from multi-state litigation An action brought in court to enforce a particular right. The act or process of bringing a lawsuit in and of itself; a judicial contest; any dispute.

When a person begins a civil lawsuit, the person enters into a process called litigation.
 with tobacco product manufacturers. This group of awardees is the fourth to be funded by LSDF.

BACKGROUNDER INFORMATION

Life Sciences Discovery Fund 08-02 Program Proposals

Lawrence Corey, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, $4,727,296

Program title: Washington Vaccine Alliance

Program focus: To develop an integrated, multi-institutional program to stimulate discovery and development of vaccines for widespread use

Scientific and financial constraints throughout the vaccine development process result in delays and high product costs that limit the public health impact of candidate vaccines. Because of these challenges, the firms that develop vaccines do so only when validated animal tests or human clinical trials demonstrate a likelihood of success. The Washington Vaccine Alliance will bring a shared translational research framework and interdisciplinary expertise to vaccine economics, design, formulation, testing, materials production, immune response immune response
n.
An integrated bodily response to an antigen, especially one mediated by lymphocytes and involving recognition of antigens by specific antibodies or previously sensitized lymphocytes.
 assessment, and product planning.

Three specific vaccine projects will be initially addressed. One in five adults in Washington State is infected with the herpes simplex virus Herpes simplex virus
A virus that can cause fever and blistering on the skin, mucous membranes, or genitalia.

Mentioned in: Conjunctivitis


herpes simplex virus
 (HSV (Hue Saturation Value) A color space similar to HSB. See HSB.

HSV - hue, saturation, value
)-2. Infectious syphilis cases have doubled in the United States since 2000 and E. coli E. coli: see Escherichia coli.
E. coli
 in full Escherichia coli

Species of bacterium that inhabits the stomach and intestines. E. coli can be transmitted by water, milk, food, or flies and other insects.
 contamination continues to be a persistent problem in the nation's food sources. Each of these disease agents costs Washington and the nation billions of dollars in treatment and care.

Collaborating organizations: Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division; Infectious Disease Infectious disease

A pathological condition spread among biological species. Infectious diseases, although varied in their effects, are always associated with viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, multicellular parasites and aberrant proteins known as prions.
 Research Institute, Program for Appropriate Technology in Health The Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (more commonly known as PATH) is an international, nonprofit organization based in Seattle, Washington (USA); with offices in fourteen countries and more than 400 employees. , Seattle Biomedical Research Institute Seattle Biomedical Research Institute is the largest independent, non-profit organization in the United States focused solely on infectious disease research. The mission of SBRI's nearly 250 employees is to eliminate the world's most devastating infectious diseases through , University of Washington, Washington State University

Thomas Rea, Seattle & King County Department of Public Health, $2,653,031

Program title: Program to Integrate Technology and Cardiac Arrest cardiac arrest
n.
Abbr. CA A sudden cessation of cardiac function, resulting in loss of effective circulation.


Cardiac arrest
A condition in which the heart stops functioning.
 Resuscitation

Program focus: To improve cardiac resuscitation technology and resuscitation outcomes

Out-of-hospital heart attacks, or sudden cardiac arrests, are a major public health challenge and account for 10 percent of deaths in the United States. Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart is unable to circulate blood, usually because of a disorganized dis·or·gan·ize  
tr.v. dis·or·gan·ized, dis·or·gan·iz·ing, dis·or·gan·iz·es
To destroy the organization, systematic arrangement, or unity of.
 heart rhythm. Across the nation emergency medical services An Emergency medical service (abbreviated to initialism "EMS" in many countries) is a service providing out-of-hospital acute care and transport to definitive care, to patients with illnesses and injuries which the patient believes constitutes a medical emergency.  (EMS) attempt resuscitation in hundreds of thousands of victims each year with less than 20 percent being successful, indicating an opportunity to advance public health if resuscitation therapies and technology can be improved. Public health researchers from the Seattle & King County Department of Public Health will work to improve on technology applications that affect sudden cardiac arrest outcomes. They will couple clinical resources with corporate and EMS stakeholders whose experience spans the technical, research, and clinical components of resuscitation.

Each year 4,000 Washingtonians suffer a sudden cardiac arrest. Low survival rates indicate room for improvement. Successful resuscitation requires a coordinated, time-sensitive set of rescuer actions that integrate activation of emergency response, CPR Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Definition

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a procedure to support and maintain breathing and circulation for a person who has stopped breathing (respiratory arrest) and/or whose heart has stopped (cardiac
, defibrillation Defibrillation Definition

Defibrillation is a process in which an electronic device sends an electric shock to the heart to stop an extremely rapid, irregular heartbeat, and restore the normal heart rhythm.
, and advanced medical therapies, collectively called the 'links in the chain of survival.' Across these 'links,' there is a strong interface between technology and human. The technologies include defibrillator-monitors, devices that aid CPR, and communication tools. Researchers hope to better integrate these technologies to develop complementary resuscitation methods including active guidance of rescuer actions during resuscitation and innovative approaches for education. Findings and practices will be translated across the state using a web-based training tool and a resuscitation training academy.

Collaborating organizations: University of Washington, Philips Medical, Physio-Control, Inc.

John Roll, Washington State University, $4,048,617

Program title: Program of Excellence in Rural Mental Health and Substance Abuse

Program focus: To improve the delivery of mental health and substance abuse services in rural, underserved communities

The use of evidence-based treatments (EBTs), clinical guidelines that rely on what researchers have found to be effective treatment, has grown in all areas of health care in an effort to reduce errors and improve health. In the field of mental health, most EBTs have been developed for use in urban areas and may not be easily transferable to rural environments. Out of 39 Washington State counties, 23 are classified as rural with more than one million residents.

Applying a translational research approach, the investigators' first priority is to develop, modify, and implement EBTs for substance abuse and mental illness for use in Washington's rural areas. The team's long-term priority is to develop a self-sustaining program that is supported by public and private sector funds to conduct high-quality research for translation into effective treatment protocols. Through the use, refinement, and delivery of EBTs, this group of clinician-researchers seeks to improve the physical and behavioral signs and symptoms of drug and mental health disorders. If successful, the program will provide savings to Washington in the medical and social costs of managing these disorders. Washington State realizes four dollars in benefits for every dollar spent for treatment costs related to delivering treatments for alcohol, drug, and mental health disorders.

Collaborating organizations: Group Health Center for Health Studies, Swedish Medical Center
This article refers to the hospital in Seattle, Washington. For the hospital in Englewood, Colorado, see Swedish Medical Center (Colorado).


Swedish Medical Center is a large nonprofit health care provider located in Seattle, Washington.
, University of Washington, Washington Department of Social and Health Services The Department of Social and Health Services, or DSHS is Washington's social security department and is also responsible for overseeing health care in the state. Annually, 1.5 million people rely on DSHS for their services. External links
  • Official DSHS homepage
 

Patrick Stayton, University of Washington, $7,163,794

Program title: Center for Intracellular Delivery of Biologics

Program focus: To better deliver drugs to their site of action within cells

With mainstream delivery methods a drug often gets 'lost' and does not reach the proper area within a patient's body to have the designated effect. A multi-disciplinary research center with three cores--drug characterization, smart delivery systems, and preclinical models--will be created where scientists will develop new approaches for delivering biological drugs inside human cells. Highly-targeted delivery and release of these drugs to their sites of action inside the cells optimize drug therapy in defined cell populations and minimize damage to other areas of the body.

Cancer and pulmonary trauma are leading causes of death in Washington and across the nation and result in millions of inpatient hospital days. Using polymer chemistry and nanotechnology, the center investigators will develop new technology platforms by evaluating the safety and effectiveness of drug delivery systems for these medical conditions. This program will identify new intracellular drug vehicles for clinical use that could result in many new commercialization opportunities.

Collaborating organization: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

The Life Sciences Discovery Fund, a Washington State agency established in 2005, makes grant investments in innovative life sciences research to benefit Washington and its citizens.
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Date:Dec 16, 2008
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