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Last-minute thoughts on kerosene.



COUNTRYSIDE: In the July/Aug. 2006 issue a reader asked if you could rejuvenate re·ju·ve·nate  
tr.v. re·ju·ve·nat·ed, re·ju·ve·nat·ing, re·ju·ve·nates
1. To restore to youthful vigor or appearance; make young again.

2.
 kerosene kerosene or kerosine, colorless, thin mineral oil whose density is between 0.75 and 0.85 grams per cubic centimeter. A mixture of hydrocarbons, it is commonly obtained in the fractional distillation of petroleum as the portion boiling off . He has K-1 kerosene, which is more refined and will last a long time, especially in sealed plastic containers. With kerosene, the biggest villain is an open container, which allows oxidation, and water to enter. I am using up my reserve of K-1 that is 10 years old and was stored in tightly sealed five-gallon containers with no additive added. It is still 90% clear and works fine and has not hardened the wicks of my lamps. When it starts to yellow then your performance goes down. When I now open a container I add a kerosene additive from American Wick (1-800-USA-WICK) that disperses water. It contains methyl alcohol methyl alcohol: see methanol. , which is used in some gasoline additives to dry out your gasoline in winter. The claim on the bottle is that it contributes to extended wick life, reduces odors Odors

anosmia

Medicine. the absence of the sense of smell; olfactory anesthesia. Also called anosphrasia. — anosmic, adj.

halitosis

bad breath; an unpleasant odor emanating from the mouth.
, and inhibits corrosion. I cannot say if it does or does not. I have not used enough to tell if there's any difference from the untreated kerosene.

K-1 clear kerosene is the best lamp and wick-type heater fuel I have used. The kerosene with red dye (even K-l) has given me large carbon deposits on the wicks and more soot when lighting and extinguishing. Lamp oil lamp oil

see paraffin (2).
 is mostly paraffin and has not "wicked" well for me, and is more expensive for the amount of light given. Diesel fuel of any grade is just not good in lamps or wick heaters at all, in my book. Diesel fuel will actually grow bacteria in storage if not treated.

--Maki Serkahn, makimn@lcp2.net

COUNTRYSIDE: In response to "rejuvenate kerosene," July/Aug. 2006, pg. 20. I have never used old kerosene, but years ago I often used old gasoline from cars being strapped out.

Old gasoline smells different and is described as being "varnishy" and will gum up the needle valve needle valve
n.
A valve having a slender point fitting into a conical seat, used to regulate accurately the flow of a liquid or gas.
 in a carburetor if used too much. Needle valves set a carburetor's fuel air mix.

However, that is not the only problem you have. Plastic burns; to store a flammable liquid Generally, a flammable liquid means a liquid which may catch fire easily.

In the USA, there is a precise definition of flammable liquid as one with a flashpoint below 100 degrees Fahrenheit.
 in a flammable container is dangerous. The kerosene should be stored in a metal container, preferably steel drums, but copper or aluminum containers will also work.

A flammable liquid in a flammable container is an accident waiting to happen. Flammable liquid should never be stored in a dwelling where people or animals live or sleep.

My advice is if the kerosene isn't going to be used up soon, is to take it to a hazardous waste Hazardous waste

Any solid, liquid, or gaseous waste materials that, if improperly managed or disposed of, may pose substantial hazards to human health and the environment. Every industrial country in the world has had problems with managing hazardous wastes.
 disposal site to be disposed of properly.--J. Sweeny, Arizona
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Title Annotation:The wood carver
Author:Serkahn, Maki; Sweeny, J.
Publication:Countryside & Small Stock Journal
Date:Sep 1, 2006
Words:438
Previous Article:Whittling twigs and branches.
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