Printer Friendly
The Free Library
22,741,889 articles and books

LCFA - No reporting ban on youngsters' football; FOOTBALL.



Byline: LUKE Luke

early Christian; the “beloved physician.” [N.T.: Luke]

See : Evangelism
 REDDY

THE Liverpool County Football Association has responded to criticism surrounding sur·round  
tr.v. sur·round·ed, sur·round·ing, sur·rounds
1. To extend on all sides of simultaneously; encircle.

2. To enclose or confine on all sides so as to bar escape or outside communication.

n.
 its alleged banning of match reports on junior football.

The local association received criticism last month, after informing Ainsdale Juniors they had breached regulations prohibiting the production of match reports at under-seven and under-eight levels.

However, LCFA senior football development officer Jack Walton has stated a ban on the production of reports is not in place.

Speaking on behalf of the LCFA, Walton said: "A thick skin comes in handy when I read reports that The Liverpool County FA has 'banned' the publication of kids' match reports.

"The devil is in the detail, as always, but that's simply not the case. The fact is we do not publicly record results or league tables in under-sevens' and under-eights' football simply because adults can become obsessed with them, to the point where it is inhibiting in·hib·it  
tr.v. in·hib·it·ed, in·hib·it·ing, in·hib·its
1. To hold back; restrain. See Synonyms at restrain.

2. To prohibit; forbid.

3.
 the development of young players.

"We know that players, parents and grandparents love to read match reports - and we're happy to endorse To sign a paper or document, thereby making it possible for the rights represented therein to pass to another individual. Also spelled indorse.


endorse (indorse) v.
 it, so long as they are in the spirit of kids' football and not critical of the opposing team."

The policy to only produce results and league tables from under nine level upwards is rolled out across England by the Football Association.

Walton believes such measures are needed in order to manage the competitive streak of coaches and parents, which can impact upon a young footballer's opportunity to learn the game.

"Basically, kids play at that age is for really intrinsic intrinsic /in·trin·sic/ (in-trin´sik) situated entirely within or pertaining exclusively to a part.

in·trin·sic
adj.
1. Of or relating to the essential nature of a thing.

2.
 reasons," added Walton.

"They love the game, they want to be with their mates and also have fun.

"Suddenly though, when you put them in a situation with a league and points, the attitudes of coaches and parents can change and rub off on the kids. So the environment changes and impacts upon the kids.

"The kids know the score, they know how well they've done and how hard they've tried.

"This rule is more for the adults.

"It's so the focus isn't all about winning. Where a manager may say 'we've just won the under-7s league,' but the manager may have used the same players, left three out in order to win and those three may not return to the game.

"Even at under-seven, the kids are as competitive as hell, it just doesn't become win at all costs."

? SEE pages 4-7 for a round-up from some of the Merseyside junior football leagues who have submitted reports to Junior XSport.
COPYRIGHT 2011 MGN Ltd.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2011 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

 Reader Opinion

Title:

Comment:



 

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Sport
Publication:Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England)
Date:Nov 29, 2011
Words:410
Previous Article:Club gets a big kick out of World Championships; KICKBOXING.
Next Article:Dan's goal more than football; Teenager's charity work is honoured.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2014 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters