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Kicking activities for fun and physical strength!

KICKING ACTIVITIES FOR FUN AND PHYSICAL STRENGTH!

Kicking activities can provide a child who has a disability with greater coordination, improved dexterity, increased led strength and physical enjoyment for many hours. The following are goals and exercises that parents can work on with their child in teaching kicking skills.

The first goal is for your child to be able to touch a ball with his foot. The following eight steps should be followed to achieve this:

(1) Place your child in a comfortable and functional position for moving his legs.

(2) Place a large playground ball or soccer ball in front of your child.

(3) Give your child a verbal cue: "Touch the ball."

(4) Allow your child time to try and move his foot to touch the ball.

(5) If your child does not move his foot, demonstrate kicking and repeat the verbal cue.

(6) If your child still does not move his foot, repeat the verbal cue and physically assist your child in touching the ball.

(7) Reinforce your child when his foot touches the ball. Repeat the above sequence five to seven times.

(8) After five to seven repetitions, allow your child 30-60 seconds rest before beginning the sequence again. Reinforce your child during this rest period as well as during the activity.

The secong goal is for your child to be able to push a ball forward with his foot. The next eight steps should be followed:

(1) Place your child in a functional position for moving his legs.

(2) Place a large playground ball or soccer ball in front of his foot.

(3) Give your child a verbal cue: "Push the ball."

(4) Allow your child time to move his foot towards the ball.

(5) If your child does not push the ball, demonstrate and physically manipulate him through movement several times.

(6) Repeat the verbal cue and allow your child time to push the ball.

(7) Reinforce successful pushes of the ball and encourage your child to swing his leg through a greater range of motion.

(8) Repeat the above sequence five to seven times, then allow your child 30-60 seconds rest before repeating sequence. Reinforce your child during the rest period as well as during the activity.

Finally, the last goal is for your child to be able to kick the ball forward. By following the next seven steps, your child should be able to accomplish this:

(1) Place your child in a comfortable and functional position for kicking.

(2) Place a large playground ball or soccer ball in front of his foot.

(3) Give your child a verbal cue: "Kick the ball."

(4) Your child should swing his leg back and then forward to kick the ball (from previous practice).

(5) Encourage your child to swing his leg down and through the ball with greater force to kick the ball farther (physically assist your child).

(6) Repeat the above step seven to 10 times. Reinforce your child after each kick and, at the same time, provide tips on how your child can kick the ball even farther.

(7) After seven to 10 trials allow your child 30-60 seconds rest before repeating the sequence. Reinforce your child during this rest period as well as during the activity.

TEACHING SUGGESTIONS

* Explore different positions to determine your child's best position for kicking.

* Have your child try each foot to determine which is best for kicking.

* Use hula hoops, targets or soccer goals to encourage your child to kick as far as possible.

* Gradually fade assistance so that your child is kicking independently.

* Be extremely cautious when manipulating your child's leg (consult a therapist).

* If you know of other children who are also developing their kicking skills, consider organizing a team to participate in "team skill soccer."

* Encourage your child to watch soccer games.
COPYRIGHT 1990 EP Global Communications, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1990 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
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Title Annotation:for children with a disability
Publication:The Exceptional Parent
Article Type:column
Date:Sep 1, 1990
Words:638
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