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KODAK IMAGING PRESIDENT SHOWCASES PHOTOGRAPHIC BREAKTHROUGHS

 KODAK IMAGING PRESIDENT SHOWCASES
 PHOTOGRAPHIC BREAKTHROUGHS
 Thomas Unveils Depth Imaging,
 Underwater Film in Array of Upcoming Innovations
 COLOGNE, Germany, Sept. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- In a departure from tradition, Eastman Kodak Company's (NYSE: EK), Leo J. Thomas, group vice president and president of Kodak Imaging, today previewed a parade of Kodak innovations that could help redefine the photographic landscape for professional and amateur photographers.
 Thomas, speaking at the biennial Photokina imaging trade fair here, unveiled a range of new technologies and tools Kodak will consider bringing to market in the near future, including:
 -- A stunning demonstration of depth imaging photos that require no special equipment or lenses to view their three- dimensional effects;
 -- A new reversal film breakthrough in which the blue cast found in today's underwater photos is removed;
 -- A prototype rechargeable 35 mm camera for consumers that eliminates the need for replacement batteries;
 -- New activity books for children that encourage learning through photography.
 Thomas also said Kodak would announce a new line of medium- speed Ektachrome professional reversal films in 1993.
 Thomas described many imaging innovations that he said establish Kodak as the world leader in images.
 "The most fascinating chapter in photography's history is about to begin," Thomas said. "Photography is a science, and photography is a business. I have been on both sides, and I believe for photography to prosper, the science and the business must be squarely aligned."
 "With new technology, new markets and new applications, the future of photography is alive with possibilities," he noted.
 Thomas explained that a chain of taking, making and displaying photographs is the model for Kodak's imaging innovations. Within that framework, he said, "both silver halide and electronic technologies can fit in anywhere."
 "Over the last two years, Kodak has announced new imaging products at a rate of about one a week. Less than half were pure silver halide products; a third were purely electronic," he said. "About 20 percent were hybrid products, such as Photo CD. They result from fusion technologies, products made possible when the boundaries between disciplines melt away." REFOCUS ON CUSTOMERS
 Thomas said that while "people want pictures," Kodak had discovered factors that prevent customers from taking photos. "Countless Kodak moments have vanished when batteries died, or the flash was slow to recycle," he said. "Someone worried about an audible shutter click may hesitate at the critical visual moment in a child's piano recital. And many pictures don't happen simply because somebody left the camera home."
 Possible future Kodak products help overcome such hurdles, he said. Among them:
 -- A pilot program for selling single-use cameras, film and batteries in specially designed vending machines in Europe.
 -- An "always-ready" rechargeable Kodak Star 35 mm camera with a charging stand "delivers enormous convenience. People find the camera faster since it's always in its recharging cradle," Thomas said.
 -- "Ingenious single-use cameras" sold in Japan with inexpensive, detachable specialty lenses and filters that create special-effects snapshots.
 -- Programs that introduce children to picture-taking through photo-workbooks and story albums as "visual journals that engage children's skills at multiple levels, building confidence, visual literacy and writing skills."
 -- New ultra-compact Kodak Cameo 35 mm cameras -- for European and other world markets -- with flip-up flashes that minimize red-eye in flash photos.
 One model features a quiet magnetic shutter. TECHNOLOGICAL LEADERSHIP
 In professional and commercial photography, Thomas said Kodak will introduce new Ektachrome professional films in 1993 "with the best speed-to-grain performance of any film in their speed class. They will contain T-grain emulsions in all layers," Thomas said. "Ektachrome film colors have never looked better. Lemons will look more like lemons. Tomatoes and peppers will look redder, greener. And flesh tones will be remarkably true to life."
 In addition, Thomas said, Kodak researchers say they have only begun to exploit the imaging capabilities of photographic films.
 "An ISO 100 color negative film with Ektar 25 film grain and sharpness is not here today, but there is no reason we won't have it someday," he noted. "Continuing improvements in film technology do not, of themselves, cause more pictures to be taken. But by enabling better results, they drive our confidence that exposure growth will increase steadily for at least as long as anyone can responsibly foresee."
 Other Kodak innovations -- new stereo images, Kodak digital camera system models, Photo CD applications, electrophotographic and thermal color printers, and digital special effects features of the Cineon digital film system for filmmakers -- showcase Kodak's leading-edge electronic and hybrid imaging technologies.
 "The dozens of people at Kodak and Philips who developed Photo CD have named and bounded a new domain in imaging technology," he said. "This is the equivalent of discovering a new continent with fields of opportunity fenced only by the imagination. By Photokina '94, the evidence will be incontrovertible that this is, indeed, the most remarkable photographic system development of its generation."
 "We know that quality hard copy color will be in demand forever," Thomas said. "We know how to apply a common approach and platform to support of high-value product streams. We will convert our knowledge to the benefit of the only indispensable person: the customer." Thomas added that photography remains a growing medium for the basic human need to tell and share personal stories.
 "The hunger for the great story told in detail was at the heart of photography, even before George Eastman," he said. "The technology delivers these emblems of the times of our lives. Anything that improves on the delivery and on the image will have its place in the chain."
 -0- 9/16/92
 /CONTACT: Paul C. Allen, Eastman Kodak Company, 343 State Street Rochester, N.Y., 14650-0518, 716-724-5802/
 (EK) CO: Eastman Kodak Company ST: New York IN: CHM SU: PDT


LC -- CL008 -- 0004 09/16/92 09:49 EDT
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