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Integration of letter-sound correspondences and phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting: a pilot study examining the effects of instructional sequence on word reading for kindergarten children with low phonological awareness.



Abstract. Research evidence indicates that integration of letter sounds with phonological pho·nol·o·gy  
n. pl. pho·nol·o·gies
1. The study of speech sounds in language or a language with reference to their distribution and patterning and to tacit rules governing pronunciation.

2.
 blending and segmenting is critical for acquisition of beginning word reading skills. Yet, a review of kindergarten kindergarten [Ger.,=garden of children], system of preschool education. Friedrich Froebel designed (1837) the kindergarten to provide an educational situation less formal than that of the elementary school but one in which children's creative play instincts would be  intervention studies intervention studies,
n.pl the epidemiologic investigations designed to test a hypothesized cause and effect relation by modifying the supposed causal factor(s) in the study population.
 revealed that the optimal sequence for integrating these two component skills has not been investigated empirically em·pir·i·cal  
adj.
1.
a. Relying on or derived from observation or experiment: empirical results that supported the hypothesis.

b.
. In this pilot study, two sequences for integrating and teaching letter-sound correspondences and phonological blending and segmenting were compared to determine which sequence resulted in higher word reading and phonological awareness Phonological awareness is the conscious sensitivity to the sound structure of language. It includes the ability to auditorily distinguish parts of speech, such as syllables and phonemes.  performance and higher rates of growth for kindergarten children with low phonemic pho·ne·mic  
adj.
1. Of or relating to phonemes.

2. Of or relating to phonemics.

3. Serving to distinguish phonemes or distinctive features.
 segmentation skills. Fifty-five children, 36 with phonemic segmentation deficits, were randomly assigned as·sign  
tr.v. as·signed, as·sign·ing, as·signs
1. To set apart for a particular purpose; designate: assigned a day for the inspection.

2.
 to two instructional conditions: (a) parallel, integrated (PI), or (b) parallel, non-integrated (PN-I) sequence. At posttest post·test  
n.
A test given after a lesson or a period of instruction to determine what the students have learned.
, initial segmentation skills explained only 7% of the variance The discrepancy between what a party to a lawsuit alleges will be proved in pleadings and what the party actually proves at trial.

In Zoning law, an official permit to use property in a manner that departs from the way in which other property in the same locality
 for the PI group and 36% of the variance for the PN-I group on segmentation fluency flu·ent  
adj.
1.
a. Able to express oneself readily and effortlessly: a fluent speaker; fluent in three languages.

b.
 measures. The PI sequence "closed the gap" in phonemic segmentation between children with low segmentation skills and children with adequate skills by posttest. Children in the PI sequence also performed reliably higher on word reading generalization gen·er·al·i·za·tion
n.
1. The act or an instance of generalizing.

2. A principle, a statement, or an idea having general application.
 at posttest and maintenance, and the rate of change in the growth trajectory Trajectory

The curve described by a body moving through space, as of a meteor through the atmosphere, a planet around the Sun, a projectile fired from a gun, or a rocket in flight.
 for letter-sound fluency was greater for the PI sequence.

Recent promulgation PROMULGATION. The order given to cause a law to be executed, and to make it public it differs from publication. (q.v.) 1 Bl. Com. 45; Stat. 6 H. VI., c. 4.
     2.
 and implementation of the "Early Reading First" and the "Reading First" initiatives as part of the No Child Left Behind Act The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-110), commonly known as NCLB (IPA: /ˈnɪkəlbiː/), is a United States federal law that was passed in the House of Representatives on May 23, 2001  of 2001 represents a nationwide effort to help all students become readers by grade three (No Child Left Behind Act, 2001). These initiatives focus on early identification, intervention A procedure used in a lawsuit by which the court allows a third person who was not originally a party to the suit to become a party, by joining with either the plaintiff or the defendant.  and prevention of reading failure for all children, but especially young children at risk of future reading disabilities.

Prior to these initiatives, more than two decades of research have investigated questions related to phonological and alphabetic awareness and successful acquisition of beginning reading skills (e.g., Adams Adams, town (1990 pop. 9,445), Berkshire co., NW Mass., in the Berkshires, on the Hoosic River; inc. 1778. Its manufactures include chemicals, textiles, and paper products. The Berkshire region attracts tourists year-round. , 1990; Ball & Blachman, 1988, 1991; Lewkowicz, 1980; Liberman & Shankweiler, 1985; National Reading Panel, 2000; Stanovich, 1986; Torgesen & Davis, 1996; Wagner, 1988; Wagner & Torgesen, 1987). Several "big ideas" (Kameenui & Carnine, 1998) have emerged from this research base.

First, in beginning reading, phonological awareness is critical, especially in kindergarten, because it forms the foundation for developing alphabetic understanding, a skill that requires children to map the individual sounds in words onto the letters of the alphabet alphabet [Gr. alpha-beta, like Eng. ABC], system of writing, theoretically having a one-for-one relation between character (or letter) and phoneme (see phonetics). Few alphabets have achieved the ideal exactness.  in order to be able to read words (e.g., Adams, 1990; Ball & Blachman, 1991; Footman, Francis Francis, French prince, duke of Alençon and Anjou
Francis, 1554–84, French prince, duke of Alençon and Anjou; youngest son of King Henry II of France and Catherine de' Medici.
, Beeler, Winikates, & Fletcher Fletcher may refer to one of the following: Ideas and companies
  • A fletcher makes arrows, see fletching.
  • Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, the graduate school of international relations of Tufts University, located in Medford, Massachusetts.
, 1997; National Reading Panel, 2000; Smith, Simmons Simmons may refer to:

People:
  • Adelma Simmons (1903 – 1997), American author and herbalist
  • Al Simmons (1902-1956), American baseball player
  • Allan Simmons (born 1959), British scrabble player and author
  • Andrew Simmons (born 1984), British wrestler
, & Kameenui, 1998).

Second, converging con·verge  
v. con·verged, con·verg·ing, con·verg·es

v.intr.
1.
a. To tend toward or approach an intersecting point: lines that converge.

b.
 evidence suggests that specific phonological tasks, especially phonemic segmentation, are strong predictors of beginning reading ability (Muter, Hulme, Snowling, & Taylor Taylor, city (1990 pop. 70,811), Wayne co., SE Mich., a suburb of Detroit adjacent to Dearborn; founded 1847 as a township, inc. as a city 1968. A small rural village until World War II, it developed significantly in the second half of the 20th cent. , 1997; Kaminski & Good, 1996; O'Connor O'Con·nor   , Flannery 1925-1964.

American writer whose novels Wise Blood (1952) and The Violent Bear It Away (1960) and short stories, collected in such works as A Good Man Is Hard to Find
 & Jenkins Jen´kins

n. 1. A name of contempt for a flatterer of persons high in social or official life; as, the Jenkins employed by a newspaper s>.
, 1999; Snider, 1997; Spector

This article is about the company. For other uses, see Spector (disambiguation).


Spector is a company that makes bass guitars. Founded in 1974 by self-taught luthier Stuart Spector, Spector's first few instruments were essentially crude
, 1992; Wagner, Torgesen, Rashotte, Hecht Hecht   , Ben 1894-1964.

American writer of short stories, novels, such as Erik Dorn (1921), dramas, including The Front Page (1928), written with Charles MacArthur (1895-1956), and screenplays, such as Gunga Din (1938).
, Barker barker

a term for an animal that does not usually bark which makes a violent respiratory effort, often during a convulsion, accompanied by a sound which roughly resembles a dog's bark.
, et al., 1997; Yopp, 1988), and that the phonological awareness skills of phonemic segmentation and phonemic blending are necessary prerequisites for success in learning to read (Ball & Blachman, 1988, 1991; Davidson Da·vid·son   , Jo(seph) 1883-1952.

American sculptor best remembered for his vigorous portrait busts of Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Albert Einstein, among others.
 & Jenkins, 1994; Fox & Routh Routh may refer to:

Places:
  • Routh, East Riding of Yorkshire, a village in England
People with the surname Routh:
  • Brandon Routh, American actor
  • Edward Routh, British mathematician
  • Jonathan Routh, British humourist
, 1984; O'Connor, Jenkins, & Slocum Slocum may refer to:

People
  • Benjamin Slocum, Rally Co-driver/Pirate
  • Craig Slocum, actor
  • Frances Slocum, an adopted member of the Miami tribe
  • Frederick Slocum, American Astronomer
  • Heath Slocum, golfer
, 1995; Torgesen, Morgan Morgan, American family of financiers and philanthropists.

Junius Spencer Morgan, 1813–90, b. West Springfield, Mass., prospered at investment banking.
, & Davis, 1992).

Third, phonological awareness skills are teachable teach·a·ble  
adj.
1. That can be taught: teachable skills.

2. Able and willing to learn: teachable youngsters.
 (e.g., Adams, 1990; Ball & Blachman, 1988, 1991; Brady Bra·dy   , James Buchanan Known as "Diamond Jim." 1856-1917.

American financier and philanthropist who gained his nickname because of his attraction to diamonds and his extravagant lifestyle.

Noun 1.
, Fowler, Stone, & Winbury, 1994; Cunningham, 1990; O'Connor et al., 1995; National Reading Panel, 2000; Smith et al., 1998). Thus, instruction often results in significant gains in phonological awareness skills for most children. Those who received phonological awareness instruction and subsequently demonstrated increases in these skills had higher scores on measures of reading achievement than children who did not receive phonological awareness instruction (Ball & Blachman, 1991; Cunningham, 1990; Fox & Routh, 1984; Davidson & Jenkins, 1994; O'Connor et al., 1995; O'Connor, Notari-Syverson, & Vadasy, 1996; Torgesen et al., 1992).

Finally, although phonological awareness is necessary, it is not sufficient for beginning reading acquisition. Phonological awareness instruction is most advantageous for learning to read words when combined with alphabetic skills, specifically letter-sound correspondences, to establish explicit links A pointer or link that includes the exact location of the target element. For example, an explicit HREF hypertext link on an HTML page to a graphic would begin with http:// and contain the complete hierarchy of domain name and directories down to and including the graphic file.  between letters and sounds in spoken words (e.g., Ball & Blachman, 1991; Byrne Byrne (variations: Byrnes, O'Byrne, O'Byrnes, Burns, Beirne) meaning 'raven', is derived from the Irish name Ó Broin, and is the seventh most common last name in Ireland today. History
'Ó Broin', the Gaelic form of 'Byrne', means descendant of Bran.
 & Fielding-Barnsley, 1989, 1991; Ehri & McCormick, 1998; Foorman et al., 1997; National Reading Panel, 2000; Simmons & Kameenui, 1998; Vandervelden & Siegel Siegel, a surname, is associated with two ethnic groups.

As a Jewish surname Siegel (סג"ל) it could be an acronym of Segan Levi (סגן לוי), meaning "Assistant Levite".
, 1997).

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY

This pilot study examined the sequence of integrating alphabetic and phonological awareness skills that best facilitated word reading performance for children in kindergarten with limited phonological awareness. A multistep process was used as outlined below.

First, kindergarten studies were identified that involved children with low phonological awareness skills and had investigated the integration of letter-sound correspondences and the phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting to facilitate word reading. Second, a conceptual framework For the concept in aesthetics and art criticism, see .

A conceptual framework is used in research to outline possible courses of action or to present a preferred approach to a system analysis project.
 was developed to provide (a) a structure for organizing, describing, and codifying the relationship between two component skills--the integration of letter-sound correspondences and phonological blending and segmenting; and (b) a vehicle for analyzing and reporting how these component skills were integrated to attain specific instructional outcomes (i.e., word reading) in the kindergarten studies. These preliminary steps to achieve the purpose of the study are detailed in the subsequent sections.

Selection Criteria criteria (krītēr´ē),
n.
 for Kindergarten Studies

Studies were selected for analysis if they met all of the following criteria. First, the study included kindergarten children with low phonological awareness skills. Second, the independent variable included only the phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting or a combination of the two skills. This criterion
Criteria redirects here. For the indie band see Criteria (band).
A criterion is a condition/rule which enables a choice, therefore upon which a decision or judgment can be based (the plural is criteria).
 was selected because converging evidence indicates that phonemic blending and segmenting are highly correlated cor·re·late  
v. cor·re·lat·ed, cor·re·lat·ing, cor·re·lates

v.tr.
1. To put or bring into causal, complementary, parallel, or reciprocal relation.

2.
 with beginning reading acquisition. Third, letter-sound correspondences were included as part of the intervention. Fourth, a minimum of one word-reading measure was used as one of the dependent variables. Fifth, children were randomly assigned to treatment conditions Results of the Kindergarten Literature Search

The literature search identified 22 studies conducted with kindergarten children. A review of these studies revealed the following pattern. Five studies (Christensen Christensen may refer to:
  • Christensen (constructor), a former racing car constructor
  • 164P/Christensen, a periodic comet
  • 170P/Christensen, a periodic comet
  • Several other periodic comets discovered by Christensen
, 1997; McClure Mc·Clure   , Samuel Sidney 1857-1949.

Irish-born American editor and publisher who founded McClure's Magazine (1893), an influential muckraking periodical.
, Ferreira
  • Ferreira is a very common Portuguese and Galician family name. It means (female) blacksmith and also iron mine.
  • Anne Ferreira
  • Antonio Ferreira
, & Bisanz, 1996; Muter et al. 1997; Snider, 1997; Yopp, 1988) were correlation studies. Three studies were longitudinal studies longitudinal studies,
n.pl the epidemiologic studies that record data from a respresentative sample at repeated intervals over an extended span of time rather than at a single or limited number over a short period.
 that were initiated with a kindergarten cohort cohort /co·hort/ (ko´hort)
1. in epidemiology, a group of individuals sharing a common characteristic and observed over time in the group.

2.
 (Fielding-Barnsley, 1997; Foorman et al., 1997; Torgesen, Wagner, & Rashotte, 1997) and continued over several years.

Eight studies were implemented with intact classrooms of children and taught by kindergarten teachers (Blachman, Ball, Black, & Tangel, 1994; Brady et al., 1994; Brennan Bren·nan   , William Joseph, Jr. 1906-1997.

American jurist who served as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1956-1990).
 & Ireson, 1997; Kersholt, Van Bon, & Schreuder, 1997; Kozminsky & Kozminsky, 1995; Kuby & Aldridge For other uses of the term Aldridge, see .
Aldridge is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Walsall in the West Midlands, UK, although historically it was part of the county of Staffordshire until 1974.

The recorded population in the 2001 Census was 16,862.
, 1997; Lundberg, Frost, & Peterson Pe·ter·son   , Oscar Emmanuel Born 1925.

Canadian jazz pianist. A prolific recording artist noted for his technical skill, he is best known for work produced with his own trio (1953-1965).
, 1988; O'Connor et al., 1996). In these eight classroom studies a variety of phonological awareness skills were taught during the intervention. Some studies included alphabetic skills (i.e., letters) (e.g., Blachman et al., 1994); others did not (e.g., Lundberg et al., 1988; Kozminsky & Kozminsky, 1995). Two studies included only typically achieving kindergarten children (Ball & Blachman, 1991; Cunningham, 1990). One study (Vandervelden & Siegel, 1997) included children with low phonological awareness. Instruction included a variety of phonological and print activities to help kindergarten children recognize printed matches of spoken words or syllables and to spell words.

Four studies involving children with low phonological awareness (Davidson & Jenkins, 1994; Fox & Routh, 1984; O'Connor et al., 1995; Torgesen et al., 1992) evaluated the children on word reading tasks that required the use of alphabetic skills, specifically letter-sound correspondences, and the phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting. These four studies also met the final criterion of random assignment to treatment condition.

A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK ON INTEGRATION

Before developing the dimensions of a conceptual framework on integration in the specific context of letter-sound correspondences and phonological awareness instruction, it was important to understand integration from a broad instructional perspective. To assist in conceptualizing integration from this broader perspective, a definition of integration and two examples of integration are provided.

An Instructional Perspective on Integration

Integration can be defined as the arrangement of separable sep·a·ra·ble  
adj.
Possible to separate: separable sheets of paper.



sep
 component skills into a whole. To achieve certain outcomes, component skills must be taught to mastery in a specific order; that is, one component skill must be taught to mastery before another. For other outcomes, the order in which the component skills are taught to mastery may not matter. However, all component skills must be taught to mastery at some time to accomplish the outcome. The following examples provide a way to conceptualize con·cep·tu·al·ize  
v. con·cep·tu·al·ized, con·cep·tu·al·iz·ing, con·cep·tu·al·iz·es

v.tr.
To form a concept or concepts of, and especially to interpret in a conceptual way:
 integration from this broad instructional perspective.

Two instructional tasks, shoe tying and time telling, represent the extremes of what might be called order-specific integration (e.g., shoe tying) and order-neutral integration (e.g., time telling). When teaching shoe tying, four component skills must be taught: (a) lacing the shoe, (b) overlapping the laces laces

a term describing white marking on the legs in cats.
, (c) knotting the laces, and (d) tying the bow. Each component skill must be taught to mastery in sequence to accomplish the outcome, a tied shoe.

When teaching time telling, four component tasks (i.e., preskills) must be taught to mastery to attain the outcome of accurate time telling: (a) knowledge of the direction in which the hands of the clock move; (b) the rule about the "little hand points and the big hand counts;" (c) the skill of counting by fives from 0-60; and (d) the ability to switch from counting by fives to counting by ones (Silbert, Carnine, & Stein Stein , William Howard 1911-1980.

American biochemist. He shared a 1972 Nobel Prize for pioneering studies of ribonuclease.
, 1990). Any one of the first three component skills can be taught to mastery prior to teaching either of the other two. Counting by five, or the rule about the "little hand points and big hand counts" can be taught to mastery first. Neither component skill is a prerequisite pre·req·ui·site  
adj.
Required or necessary as a prior condition: Competence is prerequisite to promotion.

n.
 for teaching the other skill to mastery. That is, unlike shoe tying, which requires that the component skills be taught to mastery sequentially se·quen·tial  
adj.
1. Forming or characterized by a sequence, as of units or musical notes.

2. Sequent.



se·quen
 (e.g., order-specific), the order for teaching the first three skills in time telling to mastery is not specified (i.e., order-neutral).

Development of the Dimensions of a Conceptual Framework

A conceptual framework on integration includes at least two dimensions: (a) the order for sequencing sets of activities that will be integrated, and (b) the amount of time that is allocated for mastery of a skill or activity to a specific criterion level of performance. In the conceptual framework for examining the integration of the two component skills, letter-sound correspondences and phonological awareness, order refers to the sequence of letter-sound correspondence activities and the phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting.

Order dimension. The relationship between sets of activities can be classified into four categories: successive, parallel, integrated, and non-integrated. A relationship between sets of activities that is successive requires one set of activities to follow another set of activities, while a parallel relationship requires the two sets of activities to be taught within a specified period of time (e.g., within the same training session). The relationship between integrated sets of activities requires the two sets of activities to be systematically linked with explicit connections made between component skills. In contrast, the relationship between non-integrated sets of activities is discrete A component or device that is separate and distinct and treated as a singular unit.  and kept separate from each other; that is, the two sets of activities are not linked. Naturally, there are various combinations of these four categories when integrating the sets of activities during instruction.

The order dimension for the conceptual framework combines these four categories for organizing the relationship between sets of activities to form six primary instructional sequences, as follows: (a) successive, (b) parallel, non-integrated, (c) parallel, integrated, (d) successive/parallel, non-integrated, (e) successive/ parallel, integrated, and (f) parallel, non-integrated/ successive/parallel, integrated. A generic Generic

Describes the characteristics and/or experience of the total universe of a coupon of MBS sector type; that is, in contrast to a specific pool or collateral group, as in a specific CMO issue.
 description of these classifications for integrating sets of activities involving component skills is provided in Table 1. Because of space constraints CONSTRAINTS - A language for solving constraints using value inference.

["CONSTRAINTS: A Language for Expressing Almost-Hierarchical Descriptions", G.J. Sussman et al, Artif Intell 14(1):1-39 (Aug 1980)].
, examples in which the description is applied to the integration of letter-sound correspondences and phonological awareness instruction are provided for only two of the order sequences: parallel non-integrated and parallel integrated.

A parallel, non-integrated order refers to sets of activities that are taught within the same training session, but as discrete and separate activities in which no connection is made between the two sets of activities. In this order, phonological awareness and letter-sound correspondence are taught within the same training session, but as separate activities. No connection is developed between print and speech.

In a parallel non-integrated order children are taught the letter name and sound for m in the first activity during a lesson. In the second activity, children are taught to segment (i.e., say the individual sounds in the word map as /m/ /a/ /p/) and blend the individually pronounced sequences of phonemes (i.e., /m/ /a/ /p/ together to form the word map). The activities for letter-sound correspondences and the phonological awareness activities of blending and segmenting are taught within the same training session but separately. The activities for letter-sound correspondences and phonological awareness activities of blending and segmenting were not integrated because no explicit connection was made between the print (i.e., m = /m/) during the blending and segmenting activities. Although the first sound of the words used in the blending and segmenting was /mmmm/, no explicit connections were made between the print (i.e., the letter m that represents letter-sound correspondence) and speech (i.e., the auditory auditory /au·di·to·ry/ (aw´di-tor?e)
1. aural or otic; pertaining to the ear.

2. pertaining to hearing.


au·di·to·ry
adj.
 blending and segmenting activities).

A parallel integrated order, on the other hand, refers to a sequence in which two sets of activities are taught within the same training session, and the sets of activities are integrated and linked systematically with each other to establish explicit connections between activities. For example, phonological awareness and letter-sound correspondence activities are taught within the same training session and are integrated systematically and linked with each other to establish explicit connections between the two sets of activities. An example of a parallel integrated order follows.

The letter name and sound for m is taught, and the auditory skills of blending and segmenting are taught within the same training session. The two sets of activities are integrated when the teacher gives each child a card with the letter m on it and two blank cards. While pointing to the m letter card, the teacher says, "The name of this letter is m. The sound for this letter is /mmmm/. I'm I'm  

Contraction of I am.

Our Living Language Speakers of some scattered varieties of American English sometimes use I'm instead of I've or I have in present perfect constructions, as in
 going to say the sounds in the word map." The teacher now moves the letter card for m as s/he s/he  
pron.
Used as a gender-neutral alternative to he or she.
 says the first sound in map. As the teacher moves each blank card, s/he pronounces the middle and last sound in the word map. The teacher then points to the letter card for m and says, "/Mmmm/ /aaaa/ /p/ begins with the letter m. The first sound in /Mmmm/ /aaaa/ /p/ is /mmmm/." Explicit connections between the two sets of activities are made.

Time dimension. Time as a dimension of integration refers to the amount of actual time needed to master a skill or activity to a specified criterion level. Time needed for mastery may be based on either (a) a fixed-time criterion, or (b) a criterion level of performance. A fixed-time criterion involves a predetermined pre·de·ter·mine  
v. pre·de·ter·mined, pre·de·ter·min·ing, pre·de·ter·mines

v.tr.
1. To determine, decide, or establish in advance:
 amount of time to perform a task to a particular criterion level. The assumption is that the amount of time allotted al·lot  
tr.v. al·lot·ted, al·lot·ting, al·lots
1. To parcel out; distribute or apportion: allotting land to homesteaders; allot blame.

2.
 for mastery is sufficient for successfully completing the task at an acceptable level of mastery. For example, if phonological awareness skills are taught 10 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks, before beginning instruction in letter-sound correspondences, a fixed-time criterion is employed. The predetermined number of total minutes is assumed to be sufficient for successfully completing the phonological awareness tasks to an acceptable level of mastery.

In contrast, a criterion level of performance sets a standard of performance for mastery. The amount of time it takes to master a task is determined by the performance of a person executing the task. Achievement of mastery occurs when a person meets the criterion set as the standard to indicate mastery. For example, the performance level criterion that indicates proficiency pro·fi·cien·cy  
n. pl. pro·fi·cien·cies
The state or quality of being proficient; competence.

Noun 1. proficiency - the quality of having great facility and competence
 in phonemic segmentation is 35-45 phonemic segments per minute (Kaminski & Good, 1998). The amount of time it takes to reach mastery depends on a child's phonemic segmentation scores. Achievement of mastery in phonemic segmentation occurs when a child reaches 35-45 phonemic segments per minute, the predetermined criterion set as the standard to indicate mastery.

ANALYSIS OF KINDERGARTEN STUDIES USING THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

In this section, each of the four kindergarten studies that met the selection criteria (Davidson & Jenkins, 1994; Fox & Routh, 1984; O'Connor et al., 1995; Torgesen et al., 1992) will be analyzed an·a·lyze  
tr.v. an·a·lyzed, an·a·lyz·ing, an·a·lyz·es
1. To examine methodically by separating into parts and studying their interrelations.

2. Chemistry To make a chemical analysis of.

3.
 using the conceptual framework on integration to identify and describe which instructional sequence it used to integrate letter-sounds with the phonological skills of segmenting and blending. Each analysis includes (a) a brief statement of the study's purpose to determine if it examined the effect of instructional sequence on word--reading performance for kindergarten children with low phonological awareness; and (b) a description of the instructional sequence that was used in the study.

O'Connor, Jenkins, and Slocum (1995)

This study investigated the amount and kind of phonological instruction necessary to produce levels of phonological awareness and letter knowledge comparable to those of good readers. The researchers employed a successive/parallel, non-integrated order of integrating letter-sound correspondences and phonological awareness instruction with a fixed-time criterion for the two experimental treatment conditions. Specifically, O'Connor et al. taught only phonological awareness activities (successive) for 15 minutes, twice weekly for 4 weeks (fixed-time). After letter-sound correspondence instruction was introduced in Week 5 of the 10-week study, both phonological awareness activities and letter-sound correspondences were taught in the same training session (parallel), but separately (non-integrated), with no explicit connections developed between the two sets of activities. Beginning in Week 5, after 4 weeks of instruction in only phonological awareness tasks, the researchers added 3 minutes of instruction in letter-sound correspondences to each lesson for the two treatment conditions. However, instruction in the phonological activities of auditory segmenting and blending or a variety of phonological awareness tasks also continued at this time. The letter-sound correspondences and phonological awareness activities were taught within the same training session, but as separate activities during the lessons. No explicit connections were made between print (i.e., the letters representing the letter-sound correspondence) and speech (i.e., the phonological awareness activities of blending and segmenting).

Fox and Routh (1984)

This study examined the effects of phonological awareness training in phonemic segmentation and phonemic blending on word reading. Fox and Routh employed a successive order dimension and a time criterion, but they did not integrate the phonological awareness activities of blending and segmenting and letter-sound correspondences activities during the intervention. For example, segmenting-blending or segmenting-only activities were taught fully and completely until children produced two correct responses on either the last segmenting activity for the segmenting-only group or on the last blending activity (i.e., the time criterion). When children met this criterion level of performance, the intervention ended. Although Fox and Routh included instruction in letter-sound correspondences (i.e., alphabetic understanding), the main intent of alphabetic instruction was "to facilitate performance on the final word learning task" given as a posttest (p. 1061).

Torgesen, Morgan, and Davis (1992)

This study examined the effects of phonological awareness instruction in phonemic segmenting and blending or blending-only on the development of phonological awareness skills and word learning ability. Students in the intervention groups were taught either blending-only or segmenting and then blending, whereas the control group was taught a variety of phonological awareness tasks. After completing instruction in either blending-only or segmenting-blending, or a variety of reading activities (the intervention phase), and prior to administration of the word reading posttest, all children were taught letter-sound correspondences during the last two weeks of the study.

Like Fox and Routh (1984), Torgesen et al. (1992) used a successive order to teach the phonological skills. They did not integrate phonological awareness activities and alphabetic skills during the intervention phase. The purpose of instruction in letter-sound correspondences was to prepare children for the post-intervention word reading tasks.

Davidson and Jenkins (1994)

This study investigated the effects of instruction in the phonological awareness tasks of segmenting or blending, or a combination of the two tasks on children's ability to transfer phonologic pho·nol·o·gy  
n. pl. pho·nol·o·gies
1. The study of speech sounds in language or a language with reference to their distribution and patterning and to tacit rules governing pronunciation.

2.
 skills to an untaught phonological task, word reading, and spelling SPELLING, The art of putting the proper letters in words.
     2. It is a rule that when it appears with certainty what is meant, bad spelling will not avoid a contract; for example, where a man agreed to pay thirty pounds, he was held bound to pay thirty pounds;
. Children were taught either segmenting-only, blending-only, or segmenting and blending for 10 minutes daily, for a minimum of 8 weeks and a maximum of 12 weeks. When children reached a criterion level of performance (i.e., less than 2 errors on the phonemic generalization tasks), the phonological awareness intervention phase ended. Instruction in letter-sound correspondences was initiated to prepare children for the final word reading tasks.

Like Fox and Routh (1984) and Torgesen et al. (1992), Davidson and Jenkins (1994) used a successive order in which one phonological awareness activity followed another. Phonological awareness activities and alphabetic skills were not integrated during the intervention. The sole purpose of the letter-sound correspondence instruction was to prepare children for the post-intervention word reading tasks.

Limitations of the Kindergarten Research Studies

Converging research suggests that integrating alphabetic skills, specifically letter-sound correspondences, and phonological awareness skills has a positive effect on word reading (e.g., Ball & Blachman, 1991; Byrne & Fielding-Barnsley, 1989, 1991; Vandervelden & Siegel, 1997). Despite this evidence, however, a search of the literature revealed that only four studies involving kindergarten children with low phonological awareness had evaluated children's performance on word reading tasks that required integration of the phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting and alphabetic skills, specifically, letter-sound correspondences.

An analysis of these studies using the dimensions of the conceptual framework developed for this study, order and time, identified two important limitations. First, three studies used a successive order for teaching the phonological skills during the intervention, but instruction in letter-sound correspondences was provided only after children had attained at·tain  
v. at·tained, at·tain·ing, at·tains

v.tr.
1. To gain as an objective; achieve: attain a diploma by hard work.

2.
 a performance criterion in phonological awareness skills. Alphabetic instruction was not included in the intervention, and no integration of letter-sound correspondences and phonological blending and segmenting skills occurred.

Second, O'Connor et al. (1995) investigated how readily children transferred letter-sound correspondences to beginning word reading following explicit instruction in phonological awareness skills. To do so, the researchers used a successive/parallel, non-integrated order with a fixed-time dimension to integrate the phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting and alphabetic skills, specifically, letter-sound correspondences during instruction. The phonological skills of blending and segmenting and letter sounds were taught in the same training period (i.e., parallel), but the skills were taught as discrete and separate activities (i.e., non-integrated).

The results of the analysis suggest that only two of the order sequences for integrating letter-sounds with phonological blending and segmenting were used in kindergarten intervention research, and that none of the kindergarten studies examined the effect that an instructional sequence for integrating alphabetic skills, specifically letter-sound correspondences, and phonological blending and segmenting had on word reading performance and rates of growth in word reading. Thus, it appears that the optimal sequence for integrating letter-sound correspondences and the phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting to increase word reading performance for kindergarten children with low phonological awareness has not been investigated empirically, but remains a substantive Substantive may refer to:

In grammar:
  • a noun substantive, now also called simply noun
  • a verb substantive, a verb like English "be" when expressing existence (in contrast to use as a copula)
In law:
 and real "blank spot" (Wagner, 1993) in kindergarten research.

RESEARCH QUESTIONS

The research questions for this pilot study were developed based on (a) the analysis of kindergarten studies using the conceptual framework for integration, and Co) prior research evidence. First, as revealed by the analysis of the kindergarten studies, the successive and the successive, parallel non-integrated order sequences for integrating letter-sounds and the phonological skills of blending and segmenting had been used in previous kindergarten interventions. Second, research evidence suggests that it is important to establish links between letters and sounds in spoken words (Ball & Blachman, 1991; Byrne & Fielding-Barnsley, 1989, 1991; Ehri & McCormick, 1998; Foorman et al., 1997; Simmons & Kameenui, 1998; Vandervelden & Siegel, 1997) for successful acquisition of beginning word reading. Establishing these links during instruction may best be achieved by developing lessons that use the two sequences in which phonological blending and segmenting and letter-sounds instruction were taught within the same training session (i.e., parallel) with the two component skills being explicitly linked together (i.e., integrated) or linked by being taught within the same training session but not integrated.

Thus, in this pilot study, two instructional sequences--parallel, integrated (PI) and parallel, non-integrated (PN-I)--were compared to determine which instructional sequence resulted in higher performance and rates of growth on word reading and phonological awareness for kindergarten children with low phonological awareness. Five research questions were formulated for·mu·late  
tr.v. for·mu·lat·ed, for·mu·lat·ing, for·mu·lates
1.
a. To state as or reduce to a formula.

b. To express in systematic terms or concepts.

c.
.

1. Does a parallel, integrated (PI) sequence of instruction result in higher word reading performance for kindergarten children with low phonological awareness skills than a parallel, non-integrated (PN-I) sequence of instruction?

2. Were the effects of instruction maintained for word reading performance after the intervention was discontinued dis·con·tin·ue  
v. dis·con·tin·ued, dis·con·tin·u·ing, dis·con·tin·ues

v.tr.
1. To stop doing or providing (something); end or abandon:
?

3. Does a parallel, integrated (PI) sequence of instruction result in higher phonological awareness performance for kindergarten children with low phonological awareness skills than a parallel, non-integrated (PN-I) sequence of instruction?

4. Were the effects of instruction maintained for phonological awareness performance after the intervention was discontinued?

5. Does a parallel, integrated (PI) sequence of instruction result in higher rates of growth in word reading and phonological awareness for kindergarten children with low phonological awareness skills than a parallel, non-integrated (PN-I) sequence of instruction?

METHODOLOGY

The following sections describe the methods used to address the research questions, including design, setting and subjects, independent and dependent measures, procedures, and data analysis.

Design

A pretest-posttest, comparison group design with random assignment of participants to groups was used to examine the effects of two instructional sequences for integrating the teaching of letter-sound correspondences and the teaching of the phonological skills of blending and segmenting on word reading performance for kindergarten children with low phonological awareness.

The between-groups factor was instructional sequence with two levels: (a) parallel, integrated (PI) and (b) parallel, non-integrated (PN-I). The within-groups, repeated factor was time of test with two levels (a) posttest and (b) delayed posttest, or three levels (a) posttest, (b) delayed posttest, and (c) maintenance. In addition, formative formative /for·ma·tive/ (for´mah-tiv) concerned in the origination and development of an organism, part, or tissue.  data from bi-weekly progress monitoring probes were used to assess the rate of change in learning trajectory as defined by slope of performance for individuals and groups beyond that typical of pretest-posttest designs.

Setting

Five kindergarten classrooms in three elementary schools elementary school: see school.  in a Pacific Northwest school “Northwest School” redirects here. For other uses, see Northwest School (disambiguation).

The Northwest School (originally The Northwest School of the Arts, Humanities and Environment
 district participated in this study. School A, with a total school population of 192 children, had a morning kindergarten session with 16 children and an afternoon session with 7 children. The same classroom teacher taught both sessions. School B served a total school population of 141 children with a morning and afternoon kindergarten session. The morning session was a kindergarten and first-grade combination classroom with 9 kindergarten children. The afternoon session was a kindergarten-only classroom with 19 children. Different classroom teachers taught the morning and afternoon kindergarten sessions. School C served a total school population of 129 children with one morning kindergarten session of 12 children. Schools A and B were classified as Title 1 schools. School C also had Title 1 standing prior to the school year during which the study took place, but did not qualify for the current academic year.

Children in Schools A and B attended half-day half-day
Noun

a day when one works only in the morning or only in the afternoon

half-day half nhalber freier Tag m 
 kindergarten (i.e., 2.5 hours per day) 5 days a week. Children in School C attended half-day kindergarten 4 days per week, Tuesday-Friday, for approximately ap·prox·i·mate  
adj.
1. Almost exact or correct: the approximate time of the accident.

2.
 3 hours 10 minutes per day. Table 2 shows the number of children in each classroom and the number of treatment groups per classroom across schools.

Kindergarten classes in all three schools participated in music, physical education, library story time, and the SMART reading program, a volunteer reading-aloud program. Prior to intervention, the investigator met with the classroom kindergarten teachers to obtain information about each teacher's early literacy literacy

Ability to read and write. The term may also refer to familiarity with literature and to a basic level of education obtained through the written word. In ancient civilizations such as those of the Sumerians and Babylonians, literacy was the province of an elite
 program. Each teacher was asked to describe the focus of her early literacy instruction and the types of activities she used during instruction. Furthermore, in mid-February n. 1. the middle part of February.

Noun 1. mid-February - the middle part of February
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue
, the investigator formally observed one early literacy lesson for each classroom kindergarten teacher to validate To prove something to be sound or logical. Also to certify conformance to a standard. Contrast with "verify," which means to prove something to be correct.

For example, data entry validity checking determines whether the data make sense (numbers fall within a range, numeric data
 their self-report regarding kindergarten literacy instruction and activities. During the observation the investigator noted the instructional setting (i.e., large or small group) and the content of the lesson. Early literacy activities included story reading, letter name and sound instruction, and writing instruction. Story reading sessions used predictable books and big books that fit a particular theme to develop print awareness Print awareness refers to a child's understanding of the nature and uses of print. A child's print awareness is closely associated with his or her word awareness or the ability to recognize words as distinct elements of oral and written communication. . Group discussions during story time were used to develop listening comprehension comprehension

Act of or capacity for grasping with the intellect. The term is most often used in connection with tests of reading skills and language abilities, though other abilities (e.g., mathematical reasoning) may also be examined.
 skills and to emphasize the importance of reading.

Participant Selection

In late November November: see month. , a norm-referenced, individually administered, standardized test A standardized test is a test administered and scored in a standard manner. The tests are designed in such a way that the "questions, conditions for administering, scoring procedures, and interpretations are consistent" [1] , the Word Identification Subtest of the Woodcock woodcock: see snipe.
woodcock

Any of five species (family Scolopacidae) of plump, sharp-billed migratory birds of damp, dense woodlands in North America, Europe, and Asia.
 Reading Mastery Test-Revised [WRMT-R] (1987), was administered to all children in the five kindergarten classrooms (n = 63) as a screening measure to identify nonreaders. A child was classified as a nonreader non·read·er  
n.
A person who cannot or does not read, especially a child who takes a long time learning to read.

Noun 1. nonreader - a student who is very slow in learning to read
 if s/he read 5 or fewer words on the WRMT-R. (The WRMT-R will be described fully in the dependent variables section.) Approximately 94% of the children (n = 59) met the nonreader criterion and, therefore, were eligible to participate in the study. Approximately 6% of the children (n = 4) read 9, 18, 22, and 50 words, respectively. These children were considered readers and were not eligible to participate in the study. Parental permission was obtained for 55 of the eligible children.

Assignment to Treatment Conditions

A four-step process was used to randomly assign children within each classroom to treatment conditions. First, pretests that assessed phonological awareness skills, language ability, and alphabetic skills were administered in mid-December Noun 1. mid-December - the middle part of December
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"

Dec, December - the last (12th) month of the year
. Second, children's scores on the Letter Naming Fluency (LNF LNF - ["A Fully Lazy Higher Order Purely Functional Programming Language With Reduction Semantics", K.L. Greene, CASE Center TR 8503, Syracuse U 1985]. ) measure were ranked and ordered from highest to lowest score. Third, children were paired using the LNF rank order. Children with the two highest scores formed the first pair, children with next highest scores formed the second pair, and so on. Fourth, pairs of children were assigned randomly, one member of the pair to the parallel, integrated (PI) instructional sequence, the other to the parallel, non-integrated (PN-I) instructional sequence.

Participant Characteristics

Because converging research evidence suggested that children with low phonological awareness in kindergarten could be at risk of future reading disability, children's initial phonological awareness skills were of interest. An examination of children's performance on the Phonemic Segmentation Fluency (PSF (Print Services Facility) Software from IBM that performs the printer rasterization for IBM's AFP and other page description languages. PSF products are available for IBM mainframes, AS/400 and RS/6000 series and output the IPDS format for IBM printers. ) pretest pre·test  
n.
1.
a. A preliminary test administered to determine a student's baseline knowledge or preparedness for an educational experience or course of study.

b. A test taken for practice.

2.
 measure revealed that approximately 65% (n = 36) of the eligible 55 children produced 10 or fewer phoneme phoneme

Smallest unit of speech distinguishing one word (or word element) from another (e.g., the sound p in tap, which differentiates that word from tab and tag). The term is usually restricted to vowels and consonants, but some linguists include differences of pitch,
 segments per minute. According to according to
prep.
1. As stated or indicated by; on the authority of: according to historians.

2. In keeping with: according to instructions.

3.
 Good, Simmons, and Smith (1998), scores within these ranges on the PSF in winter of the kindergarten year could signal difficulties in successful reading acquisition if not remediated. The remainder of the eligible children's pretest scores (n = 19) indicated that phonemic segmentation skills were emerging (i.e., between 11 and 34 phoneme segments per minute). These scores were considered adequate at this time of the kindergarten year. Since the only requirement for participation in the study was being a nonreader (i.e., reading 5 or fewer words correctly on the Word Identification Subtest of the WRMT-R), it was decided that all the eligible children in the kindergarten classrooms could benefit from the explicit phonemic segmentation instruction provided during this study.

INDEPENDENT VARIABLE: TREATMENT CONDITIONS

The purpose of this study was to determine which sequence of integrating alphabetic skills and phonological awareness best facilitates word reading performance for kindergarten children with low phonological awareness skills. Two instructional sequences (a) parallel, non-integrated (PN-I), and (b) parallel-integrated (PI) were employed as the independent variable.

Common Curriculum Features

Forty 15-minute instructional lessons that included instruction in letter names and letter-sound correspondences and the phonological awareness skills of sequential One after the other in some consecutive order such as by name or number.  phoneme blending and segmentation were developed for each of the two instructional sequences. Each 15-minute instructional session contained 7.5 minutes of instruction that required print (i.e., letters) and 7.5 minutes of phonological awareness instruction in sequential phoneme blending and segmentation of two- and three-phoneme words that did not involve print (i.e., letters). All activities were scripted to ensure consistency of instructional language across groups.

Both instructional sequences provided clear, unambiguous strategies for teaching letter names and sounds, and phonological blending and segmenting skills. All lessons contained carefully sequenced examples, practice, corrective cor·rec·tive
adj.
Counteracting or modifying what is malfunctioning, undesirable, or injurious.

n.
An agent that corrects.


corrective,
n
 feedback, and review. Letter names and sounds were taught simultaneously during print activities, and the amount of time children were engaged in print activities was the same for both instructional groups. For activities involving no print (i.e., letters), the amount of time and the content of the sequential blending and segmenting activities were identical for both instructional groups.

During activities that involved print (i.e., letters), the letter name and the most common sound for each letter were taught simultaneously (e.g., "The name of this letter is--. The sound for this letter is /--/."). The name and sound of letters that appear most often in words (i.e., more useful letters) were introduced in the teaching cycle first. Letters with more auditorily similar (e.g., /d/ and /t/) or more visually similar (e.g., m and n) letter names and sounds were separated. For example, the letter name and sound for m were taught in Lesson 4, and the letter name and sound for the letter n were introduced in Lesson 24. A new letter name and its sound were introduced every 2 days and were reviewed systematically in the following lessons. Children in both treatment conditions were taught the letter names and sounds for 13 consonants This is a list of all consonants, ordered by place and manner of articulation. Ordered by place of articulation
Labial consonants

Bilabial consonants

  • bilabial click [ʘ] 
 (m, t, s, f, d, r, p, n l, c, b, g, h) and 4 vowels (a, i, o, u).

Within each 15-minute lesson, children in both treatment conditions were engaged in 7.5 minutes of phonological awareness instruction that taught sequential phoneme blending and segmentation and required no print (i.e., letters). In Lessons 1-20, the phoneme blending and segmentation skills were taught as separate activities but within the same lesson. During the phoneme blending activity the teacher said the individual sounds in a word slowly and then directed children to say the word "fast" (e.g., "I'll I'll  

Contraction of I will.


I'll I will or I shall
I'll will ~shall
 say the sounds in a word slowly, then you say it fast. Listen, /fffff/ /iiiii/ /zzzzz/. Say it fast. Fizz."). The teacher used the same word sets for the phoneme segmentation activity in which children were taught to say the sounds in each word slowly (e.g., "We're we're  

Contraction of we are.


we're we are
 going to say the sounds in the word fizz slowly. /fffff/ /iiiii/ /zzzzz/. Say the sounds in the word fizz slowly.").

In Lesson 21, the phoneme blending and segmentation activities were combined. That is, children were taught to say the sounds in a word slowly, and then say the word "fast" within the same activity. The following example demonstrates this combined activity.
   Teacher: "Listen. /Sssss/ /aaaaa/ /mmmm/."
   Teacher: "Say it slowly."
   Children: "/Sssss/ /aaaaa/ /mmmm/."
   Teacher: "Say it fast."
   Children: "Sam."


Word sets for the phoneme blending and segmentation activities included 4-6 regular (i.e., each letter in a word represents its most common sound) words with the consonant-vowel (e.g., am) and/or and/or  
conj.
Used to indicate that either or both of the items connected by it are involved.

Usage Note: And/or is widely used in legal and business writing.
 consonant-vowel-consonant (e.g., mat) pattern. To avoid predictability, only 2 words with a phoneme in the same position (e.g., sad, sat) were included in each word set.

Several types of instructional materials were used to scaffold scaffold

Temporary platform used to elevate and support workers and materials during work on a structure or machine. It consists of one or more wooden planks and is supported by either a timber or a tubular steel or aluminum frame; bamboo is used in parts of Asia.
 the complexity of a phoneme blending and segmentation task. Cards with a picture representation of the word were used whenever possible. When a word did not have a picture representation (e.g., am), a sentence that contained the target word was used during the blending and segmentation activities to provide a context for the word (e.g., I am hungry.). A plastic coiled coil 1  
n.
1.
a. A series of connected spirals or concentric rings formed by gathering or winding: a coil of rope; long coils of hair.

b.
 spring (i.e., a "Slinky slink·y  
adj. slink·i·er, slink·i·est
1. Stealthy, furtive, and sneaking.

2. Informal Graceful, sinuous, and sleek: wore a slinky outfit to the party.
") was used to help children represent physically the process of (a) "stretching out" the sounds as a word was said slowly (i.e., segmented), and (b) "putting together" the sounds as a word was said the "fast way" (i.e., blended). During some activities children moved a blank card or chip onto a three-square three-square
adj.
Having an equilateral triangular cross section: a three-square file. 
 template (1) A pre-designed document or data file formatted for common purposes such as a fax, invoice or business letter. If the document contains an automated process, such as a word processing macro or spreadsheet formula, then the programming is already written and embedded in the  to represent each phoneme as it was said slowly (Ball & Blachman, 1991; O'Connor et al., 1995). All lessons included a game that reviewed and reinforced phoneme blending and segmentation skills.

Differences Between Treatment Conditions

The critical difference between treatment conditions occurred during the 7.5 minutes of each 15-minute lesson when children were engaged in activities that required print (i.e., letters). The two sequences differed on a single variable--the presence or absence of explicit connections between letter-sound correspondences and the phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting during activities involving print. In the parallel integrated (PI) sequence, the alphabetic skills of letter naming and letter-sound correspondences and the phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting were systematically and explicitly linked during instruction involving print (i.e., letters). In the parallel non-integrated (PN-I) sequence, letter names and letter-sound correspondences and the phonological blending and segmenting skills were taught as separate activities. No explicit connections were made between the alphabetic activities that taught letter names and letter-sound correspondences and the phonological blending and segmenting activities during instruction involving print.

Parallel integrated (PI) sequence. In the PI sequence, explicit connections were made between the sounds represented by the printed letters and the phonemes in the words that were taught during the phoneme blending and segmentation activities. The 7.5 minutes of instruction that involved print was divided into two activities. In the first, children were taught the names and sounds for letters (e. g., m = /m/). In the integration activity, the letter names and sounds were systematically integrated with words that children were taught during the phonological blending and segmenting activities. Specifically, letters were used to represent the phonemes in some words children were taught only to blend and segment during the 7.5 minutes of instruction in the phonological awareness activities that involved no print. Either a blank card or a letter was used to represent the phoneme in a word during the integration activity, determined by when a letter name and sound were introduced or reviewed in the lesson sequence. For example, when a letter's name and sound had been taught for two consecutive lessons during the first print activity, a blank card was used to represent the phoneme in the word during the integration activity. However, after a letter's name and sound had been taught explicitly in four consecutive lessons, a letter card was used to represent the phoneme in a word during the integration activity.

The following example illustrates how letters were used to represent the phonemes during an integration activity after the letter name and sound for the letter a was taught expli-citly during four consecutive lessons in the first print activity.

Children were given a 3 X 3 card with the letter a on it and two blank 3 X 3 cards. While pointing to the letter card for a, the teacher said, "The name of this letter is a. The sound for this letter is /aaaaa/. I'm going to say the sounds in the word mat." The teacher moved the blank card as she pronounced the first phoneme /mmmm/. The teacher likewise moved the letter card for a as she pronounced the /aaaaaa/ sound. Finally, the teacher moved a blank card as she pronounced the phoneme /t/ in the word mat. Next, she pointed to each card in the sequence and said, "The first sound in /mmmm/ /aaaaa/ /t/ is /mmmm/. The middle sound in /mmmm/ /aaaaa/ /t/ is /aaaaa/. The last sound in the word /mmmm/ /aaaaa/ /t/ is /t/." When a letter was used to represent all the phonemes in a word (i.e., after its letter name and sound had been taught explicitly in four consecutive lessons), the word was printed on a large card. The teacher directed children to "say the sounds in the word slowly" as she moved her finger under each letter on the word card. After children said the sounds for each letter slowly, the teacher told them to say the word "fast." Only regular words (i.e., each letter in a word represents its most common sound) with a consonant-vowel (e.g., am) and consonant-vowel-consonant (e.g., mat) pattern were used during the integration activity.

Parallel non-integrated (PN-I) sequence. In the PN-I sequence, the activities involving print and the phonological awareness activities of phoneme blending and segmenting that involved no print were taught within the same lesson (i.e., parallel) but as separate activities. No explicit connections were developed between the two sets of activities. Letter-sound correspondences and phonological blending and segmenting were not integrated. For example, during the 7.5 minutes of instruction involving no print (i.e., during the phoneme blending and segmenting activities), children were taught to blend and segment words containing the /m/ phoneme (e.g., mat). In the same lesson, children also were taught the letter name for m and the sound /m/ (e.g., "The name of this letter is m. The sound for this letter is /m/) during the 7.5 minutes of instruction involving print. However, no explicit connections were made between the sound for /m/ represented by the letter m and the /m/ phoneme in the words that were taught during the phonological blending and segmentation activities.

In Lessons 1-20, the 7.5 minutes of instruction involving print occurred during three separate activities: (a) at the beginning of the lesson, (b) between the phonological blending and segmenting activity, and (c) at the end of the lesson. In Lessons 21-40, the activities involving print were divided into two activity periods: (a) one at the beginning of the lesson, prior to the phonological blending and segmentation activity; and (b) one at the end of the lesson after the phonological blending and segmentation. Although both the print activities and the phonological blending and segmenting activities contained the /m/ phoneme, no connections were made between the alphabetic and the phonological blending and segmenting activities

IMPLEMENTATION PROCEDURES

Four project teachers hired specifically for the study taught the lessons for 10 weeks, 15 minutes per day, 4 days a week, to groups of 3-4 children. These teachers varied in levels of experience. Teachers 1 and 2 had completed a teacher education program but had no teaching experience except the practicum practicum (prak´tikm),
n See internship.
 experiences in their training program. Teacher 3 had a degree but not in education, and Teacher 4 had over 20 years of teaching experience. All project teachers delivered instruction for both treatment conditions to control for teacher effects that could result from the varying degrees of teaching experience during implementation. Project teachers within each classroom also changed instructional groups at Lesson 21 to control for teacher effects within classrooms. See Table 3 for teachers in school, classroom, treatment condition, and lessons.

Treatment fidelity Fidelity is a notion that at its most abstract level implies a truthful connection to a source or sources. Its original meaning dealt with loyalty and attentiveness to one's duty to a lord or a king, in a broader sense than the related concept of fealty. . To ensure integrity of treatment implementation, project teachers participated in six hours of training. Three hours of training on implementation of Lessons 1-20 occurred prior to beginning the study. Three additional hours of training was provided prior to implementation of the activities in Lessons 21-40. During training the investigator modeled lessons and provided opportunities for the teachers to practice delivering the lessons. Training sessions focused on helping teachers to develop a conceptual con·cep·tu·al
adj.
Relating to concepts or the the formation of concepts.
 understanding of the critical instructional design Instructional design is the practice of arranging media (communication technology) and content to help learners and teachers transfer knowledge most effectively. The process consists broadly of determining the current state of learner understanding, defining the end goal of  features of the lessons and emphasized em·pha·size  
tr.v. em·pha·sized, em·pha·siz·ing, em·pha·siz·es
To give emphasis to; stress.



[From emphasis.]

Adj. 1.
 the similarities and the important differences in the lesson procedures between the two treatment conditions.

Throughout the study, the investigator conducted both full and partial lesson observations to ensure implementation fidelity. Specifically, during a full lesson observation, the investigator observed one teacher for the entire 15-minute lesson and used a checklist containing the critical lesson features to assess implementation fidelity. During a partial fidelity of implementation observation, the investigator used the scripted lesson to monitor lesson delivery and observed more than one teacher during a 15-minute lesson.

Fifty-four Adj. 1. fifty-four - being four more than fifty
54, liv

cardinal - being or denoting a numerical quantity but not order; "cardinal numbers"
 full lesson observations, representing approximately 27% of the total number of lessons taught during the intervention period, and 67 partial lesson observations, representing approximately 61% of the total number of lessons taught were conducted during the 10-week study. Following the observations, the investigator provided feedback, modeled activities, or offered additional training if necessary.

Inter-observer reliability. Results of the data collected from the full fidelity of implementation observations indicated that the percentage of correct implementation procedures for both treatment conditions ranged from 81 to 100% per lesson (M = 98%). No significant differences in fidelity of implementation for treatment conditions, t (52) = -1.25, p > .05, were found.

To establish inter-observer reliability, a second person observed 20 (approximately 37%) of the 54 lessons with the investigator. Reliability was calculated by dividing the total number of agreements by the number of agreements plus disagreements. Reliability scores on observations ranged from 87% to 100% agreement, with a mean inter-rater reliability Inter-rater reliability, Inter-rater agreement, or Concordance is the degree of agreement among raters. It gives a score of how much , or consensus, there is in the ratings given by judges.  of 96%.

DEPENDENT VARIABLES

The study included measures of (a) alphabetic knowledge, (b) phonological awareness, (c) language ability, and (d) rapid retrieval of information. Data were collected during six periods of the study: (a) screening, (b) pretest, (c) formative progress monitoring, (d) posttest, (e) delayed posttest, and (f) maintenance. Posttests were administered at the end of the week in which the study ended, and delayed posttests were administered approximately 10 instructional days later. Maintenance tests were administered 6 weeks after the study ended. Formative progress monitoring measures were administered during Weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8 of the study to assess growth on Phonemic Segmentation Fluency and Nonsense NONSENSE, construction. That which in a written agreement or will is unintelligible.
     2. It is a rule of law that an instrument shall be so construed that the whole, if possible, shall stand.
 Word Fluency (DIBELS DIBELS Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills ). The following sections describe the dependent variables. Table 4 summarizes the relation of the dependent measures to the research questions

Assessment of Alphabetic Skills

Four measures were used to assess alphabetic skills. Two subtests of the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) (Good & Kaminski, 1998) were used to assess letter and word reading fluency. First, the Letter Naming Fluency (LNF) measure was administered to assess the accuracy and speed with which children named the letters of the alphabet. The ability to name letters of the alphabet rapidly and accurately has been identified as a significant predictor of future reading achievement (Kaminski & Good, 1996). Children who cannot meet the demands to quickly, accurately, and repeatedly access the symbol system (e.g., printed letters) often make limited progress in acquiring beginning word reading (e. g., Blachman, 1994; Manis Manis

see pangolin.
, Seidenberg Seidenberg can refer to:
  • the town of Zawidów
  • Ivan Seidenberg, Verizon CEO
  • Dennis Seidenberg, German athlete
  • Abraham Seidenberg, researcher of mythology
  • Avraham Seidenberg, Israeli secret agent involved in the Lavon Affair
, & Doi, 1999).

Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF NWF National Wildlife Federation
NWF National Wrestling Federation (Lake Villa, Illinois)
NWF Nonsense Word Fluency
NWF Numerical Weather Forecasting
NWF Native Warez Forum
) was used to measure children's ability to use letter-sound correspondences to read nonsense (e.g., rob) words. Nonsense word reading is the most rigorous test of alphabetic knowledge because correct responses rely primarily on a child's ability to use letter-sound correspondences to read the word correctly (Chard, Simmons, & Kameenui, 1998). In addition to the DIBELS fluency measures, the Word Identification subtest (Woodcock Reading Mastery Test-Revised [WRMT-R], 1987) was used to evaluate children's decontextualized word identification skills. The WRMT-R subtest contains both phonetically pho·net·ic  
adj.
1. Of or relating to phonetics.

2. Representing the sounds of speech with a set of distinct symbols, each designating a single sound: phonetic spelling.

3.
 regular (e.g., ten) and irregular HEIR, IRREGULAR. In Louisiana, irregular heirs are those who are neither testamentary nor legal, and who have been established by law to take the succession. See Civ. Code of Lo. art. 874.  (e.g., house) words.

Finally, an experimenter-developed Word Reading Generalization measure was administered to determine the extent to which the letter-sound correspondences that children were taught during the lessons in the absence of print generalized gen·er·al·ized
adj.
1. Involving an entire organ, as when an epileptic seizure involves all parts of the brain.

2. Not specifically adapted to a particular environment or function; not specialized.

3.
 to word reading. The following sections describe the administration procedures for each assessment.

The Letter Naming Fluency (LNF) subtest of the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) (Good & Kaminski, 1998). The LNF is an individually administered test that assesses children's ability to name upper- and lower-case letters of the alphabet rapidly and accurately. The child is expected to tell only the name of the letter, not whether it is capital or lower case. Letters are randomly arranged in 11 lines per 8-1/2 x 11 paper with 10 letters per line. The examiner instructs the child to "Tell me the names of as many letters as you can. When I say 'begin,' start here (point to first letter) and go across the page (point). Point to each letter and tell me the name of that letter. If you come to a letter you don't know Don't know (DK, DKed)

"Don't know the trade." A Street expression used whenever one party lacks knowledge of a trade or receives conflicting instructions from the other party.
, I'll tell it to you. Put your finger on the first letter. Ready, begin." The examiner tells the child to stop at the end of 1 minute. The score is the number of correct letter names stated per minute. Reliability and validity for LNF are high (.99) with kindergartners (Kaminski & Good, 1996). One-year adj. 1. completing its life cycle within a year.

Adj. 1. one-year - completing its life cycle within a year; "a border of annual flowering plants"
annual

phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants
 predictive validity In psychometrics, predictive validity is the extent to which a scale predicts scores on some criterion measure.

For example, the validity of a cognitive test for job performance is the correlation between test scores and, for example, supervisor performance ratings.
 coefficients with reading criterion measures range from .59 to .90 (Kaminski & Good, 1996).

Nonsense Word Reading Fluency (NWF) subtest of Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) (Kaminski & Good, 1996). The NWF measure combines high-utility and high-frequency sounds to form the nonsense words (e.g., rom). Both accuracy and fluency are measured. The examiner presents each student with an 8-1/2 X 11 sheet with 80 two- and three-letter nonsense words (e.g., lut) and instructs the child to read either the sounds in the word or the whole word. The number of correct letter sounds produced within 1 minute is recorded. Even though the correct letter sounds per minute is reported, the scoring procedures allow the examiner to note whether the child has (a) produced only an individual letter sound in the word, (b) blended two sounds together, or (c) decoded the entire word. Because it is timed, the NWF test is an indicator of how automatically children can translate (1) To change one language into another; for example, assemblers, compilers and interpreters translate source language into machine language.

(2) In computer graphics, to move an image on screen without rotating it.
 the print to sounds and sounds into words. Alternate-form reliability ranges from .67 to .87. The NWF correlation with the Woodcock Readiness Subtest (concurrent validity concurrent validity,
n the degree to which results from one test agree with results from other, different tests.
) ranges from .35 to .55.

Word Identification subtest of the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test-Revised (WRMT-R) (1987). The WRMT-R Word Identification subtest is an in-dividually administered, norm-referenced test A norm-referenced test is a type of test, assessment, or evaluation in which the tested individual is compared to a sample of his or her peers (referred to as a "normative sample").  with alternate alternate /al·ter·nate/ (awl´ter-nit)
1. following in turns.

2. pertaining to every other one in a series.

3. occurring in place of another; acting as a substitute.
 forms. Children are asked to orally pronounce pro·nounce  
v. pro·nounced, pro·nounc·ing, pro·nounc·es

v.tr.
1.
a. To use the organs of speech to make heard (a word or speech sound); utter.

b.
 "real words," which are arranged in order of graduated difficulty. The examiner points to the first word on the page and says, "What is this word?" If the child does not respond to the first word, the examiner scores the item as zero, tells the child the word and asks the child to repeat it. The examiner does not tell the child any other words during the remainder of the test. The test is discontinued after 6 consecutive incorrect responses. The time for administration is approximately 5-10 minutes. The WRMT-R subtest was standardized standardized

pertaining to data that have been submitted to standardization procedures.


standardized morbidity rate
see morbidity rate.

standardized mortality rate
see mortality rate.
 on 6,089 students in 60 geographically diverse communities.

Word Reading Generalization Test. This test consists of a list of 20 words that children in both treatment conditions were taught to blend and segment orally (i.e., with no print). Only words that (a) included letters that children were taught during the study, (b) had a consonant-vowel-consonant (e.g., mat) pattern, and (c) contained letters that represented the common sound for the letter were included. Words were arranged 5 words per line, 4 lines per 8-1/2 X 11 sheet of paper. During administration, the examiner placed the word list in front of the child and provided the following directions: "Read these words the best you can. Start here (examiner points to the first word) and go across the page (examiner moves finger across the words). Ready. Read these words." If a child hesitated for 5 seconds on a word or letter sound, the examiner pointed to the next word and said, "Try this word." The examiner did not provide the correct letter sound. When a child did not blend the sounds into word, the examiner provided the prompt, "What word?" This prompt was allowed twice during the assessment.

As a child read the words, the examiner (a) underlined any correct letter sounds a child produced in a word (e. g., /m/ /a//n/), and (b) indicated whether the child blended the sounds into the correct word. The examiner recorded the total time when the child had completed the task. Completion was defined as (a) when the child finished reading the last word or (b) when the child read 5 consecutive words incorrectly. The underlined words were counted and divided by the total time to obtain the correct number of words read per minute. The number of correct words read per minute was used as the indicator of children's ability to generalize generalize /gen·er·al·ize/ (-iz)
1. to spread throughout the body, as when local disease becomes systemic.

2. to form a general principle; to reason inductively.
 letter-sound correspondences they had been taught in the absence of print to reading words. The individual letter sounds produced by the children were used only to provide diagnostic information about children's letter-sound knowledge.

Assessment of Phonological Awareness

The ability to access the sound structure of a word by segmenting it into its individual phonemes has been identified as a strong predictor of successful beginning reading acquisition and a necessary prerequisite for learning to read (e.g., Ball & Blachman, 1988, 1991; Kaminski & Good, 1996; Muter et al., 1997; National Reading Panel Report, 2000; O'Connor & Jenkins, 1999; Wagner, Torgesen et al., 1997; Yopp, 1988). Two reliable and valid instruments were used to assess children's ability to segment words.

Onset Recognition Fluency (OnRF) subtest of Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) (Kaminski & Good, 1996). The OnRF measure is individually administered and assesses the fluency of onset (i.e., the sounds in a word preceding the vowel vowel

Speech sound in which air from the lungs passes through the mouth with minimal obstruction and without audible friction, like the i in fit. The word also refers to a letter representing such a sound (a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y).
) recognition and production. The examiner asks the child to identify which item in a group of four pictures begins with a specified sound or to produce the sound for a picture labeled by the examiner.

The following is an example of an onset-recognition task. The examiner points to each of four pictures and says, "This is a sink, a cat, gloves, and a hat. Which picture begins with/gl/?" The child can respond by pointing to the picture or saying the word gloves. Every fourth response requires the child to produce the sound for a picture labeled by the examiner. For example, the examiner says, "What sound does cat begin with?" The examiner records the child's responses and calculates the number of correct onsets per minute. Norms for the OnRF have been established for children in late preschool through the middle of kindergarten, and reliability ranges from .65 to .90 (Kaminski & Good, 1998). Concurrent validity with the DIBELS Phoneme Segmentation Fluency (PSF) measure ranges from .44 to .60.

Phonemic Segmentation Fluency (PSF) subtest of Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) (Good & Kaminski, 1998). The PSF is a 1-minute timed measure in which the child is presented a word orally and asked to produce the individual sounds in the word. For example, the examiner asks the child to say the sounds in the word sat. The child should respond with the sounds, /s/ /a/ /t/. Directions for the PSF measure include a model of the task (e.g., "I am going to say a word. After I say it, you tell me all the sounds in the word. So, if I say, Sam (1) (Security Accounts Manager) The part of Windows NT that manages the database of usernames, passwords and permissions. A SAM resides in each server as well as in each domain controller. See PDC and trust relationship. , you would say /Sss/ /aaa/ /mmm/."). Following the model, the examiner asks the child to practice, "Tell me the sounds in mop." If a child responds incorrectly, the examiner provides corrective feedback, "The sounds in mop are /mmm/ /ooo/ /p/." The words are arranged in 12 lines, 2 words per line. The number of phonemes contained in each word determines the number of phonemes per line. For example, a line with the words prize and sighed has 7 phonemes per line, whereas a line with the words helped and stood contains 9 phonemes per line. The total number of phonemes per form ranges from 74 to 229. At the end of 1 minute the examiner stops presenting words and adds up the number of correctly identified phonemes to obtain the number of correct phoneme segments per minute.

The PSF provides a quick, reliable and valid indication of phonemic segmentation skills (Kaminski & Good, 1996) with alternate-form reliability of .88 for kindergartners, criterion-related validity ranges from .43 to .67, and predictive validity ranges from .60 to .91 (Johnson, 1996). There are 20 alternate forms of the PSF.

Assessment of Rapid Retrieval of Information

Rapid naming of objects has been identified as a significant predictor of reading achievement that appears to be independent of phonological awareness skills (e.g., Blachman, 1994; Torgesen et al., 1994; Wolf & Bowers Bowers is a surname, and may refer to
  • Betty Bowers
  • Bryan Bowers
  • Charles Bowers
  • Claude Bowers
  • Dane Bowers
  • David A. Bowers
  • Elizabeth Crocker Bowers
  • Graham Bowers
  • Henry Francis Bowers
  • Henry Robertson Bowers, (1883 - 1912), polar explorer
, 1999). One measure of rapid naming, the Picture Naming Fluency (PNF PNF,
n proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, a manual resistance technique that works by simulating fundamental patterns of movement, such as swimming, throwing, running, or climbing. Methods used in PNF oppose motion in multiple planes concurrently.
), was administered at pretest to provide an index of group comparability on rapid naming tasks and to help understand students' response to instruction (Blachman, 1994; Torgesen, Wagner, & Rashotte, 1994; Wolf & Bowers, 1999).

Picture Naming Fluency (PNF) (Kaminski, 1996). The PNF is an individually administered, 1-minute timed test that assesses a child's ability to rapidly name objects. A set of 42 drawings of objects (e.g., sheep, pin, teacher, and top) is arranged, 6 objects per line, 7 lines per 8-1/2 X 11 sheet of paper. The examiner asks the child to verbally identify each of the pictures as quickly as s/he can. When a child (a) names a picture incorrectly, (b) stops or struggles with a picture for 3 seconds, or omits a picture, it is counted as an error. The student is not penalized pe·nal·ize  
tr.v. pe·nal·ized, pe·nal·iz·ing, pe·nal·iz·es
1. To subject to a penalty, especially for infringement of a law or official regulation. See Synonyms at punish.

2.
 for imperfect imperfect: see tense.  pronunciation pronunciation: see phonetics; phonology.

Pronunciation - In this dictionary slashes (/../) bracket phonetic pronunciations of words not found in a standard English dictionary.
 due to dialect dialect, variety of a language used by a group of speakers within a particular speech community. Every individual speaks a variety of his language, termed an idiolect. , articulation articulation

In phonetics, the shaping of the vocal tract (larynx, pharynx, and oral and nasal cavities) by positioning mobile organs (such as the tongue) relative to other parts that may be rigid (such as the hard palate) and thus modifying the airstream to produce speech
, or second language. For example, if a child consistently says /t/ for /k/ and pronounces /tat/ for /cat/, he/she receives credit for correct picture naming. At the end of 1 minute the examiner records the number of correctly identified objects.

Assessment of Verbal Language Ability

Many intervention studies have used a measure of language ability as an index of general intelligence that may influence student response to instruction (e.g., Ball & Blachman, 1991; O'Connor et al., 1995, 1996). One measure of receptive receptive /re·cep·tive/ (re-cep´tiv) capable of receiving or of responding to a stimulus.  language skills was administered at pretest to provide an indicator of group comparability on language ability and information for individual student profiles.

Peabody Peabody (pē`bədē, –bädē), city (1990 pop. 47,039), Essex co., NE Mass., a suburb of Boston, on the Danvers River; settled c.1633, inc. as South Danvers 1855, name changed 1868.  Picture Vocabulary vocabulary,
n 1. the stock or range of words possessed by an individual or a culture used for self-expression or communication.
n 2. the sum of the distinct words related to a discipline or profession.
 Test-Revised (PPVT-R PPVT-R Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised ) (Dunn Dunn may refer to:

Places
  • Dunn, Indiana (extinct)
  • Dunn, North Carolina
  • Dunn, Dane County, Wisconsin
  • Dunn, Dunn County, Wisconsin
People
  • See Dunn (surname)
Other
  • Dunn Engineering, racecar makers
 & Dunn, 1981). The PPVT-R is an individually administered test of receptive language that assesses a child's ability to comprehend single word meanings. The PPVT-R was administered at pretest only as a means to determine whether children in both treatment conditions had comparable language skills prior to beginning instruction. During administration, the examiner shows a child a set of four pictures and asks the child to. point to the picture that represents a verbally stated target word. Words on the PPVT-R are presented in order of graduated difficulty. Test administration is discontinued when a child misidentifies 6 of 8 consecutive items. The PPVT-R is a norm-referenced test. Retest re·test  
tr.v. re·test·ed, re·test·ing, re·tests
To test again.

n.
A second or repeated test.
 and alternate form reliability scores range from .77 to .82. Estimated administration time is 10 minutes.

DATA ANALYSIS

Descriptive statistics descriptive statistics

see statistics.
 were computed for the two instructional groups on all dependent variables at pretest, posttest, delayed posttest, and maintenance points in time. A 2 X 2 between-groups analysis of variance (ANOVA anova

see analysis of variance.

ANOVA Analysis of variance, see there
) was conducted on each pretest measure to assess the effect of attrition Attrition

The reduction in staff and employees in a company through normal means, such as retirement and resignation. This is natural in any business and industry.

Notes:
 on group equivalence. No pretest differences were found, and group equivalence was not affected by attrition.

When assumptions were met (e.g., homogeneity Homogeneity

The degree to which items are similar.
 of regression regression, in psychology: see defense mechanism.
regression

In statistics, a process for determining a line or curve that best represents the general trend of a data set.
), each dependent variable was analyzed using a separate analysis of covariance Covariance

A measure of the degree to which returns on two risky assets move in tandem. A positive covariance means that asset returns move together. A negative covariance means returns vary inversely.
 (ANCOVA ANCOVA Analysis of Covariance ) to examine whether there were statistically significant differences between the two instructional groups on word reading and phonological awareness performance at posttest. When the analysis resulted in a significant interaction between the covariate covariate

predictors during the allocation of experimental units in a randomized design.
 and the intervention, the nature of the interaction was examined using a regression analysis In statistics, a mathematical method of modeling the relationships among three or more variables. It is used to predict the value of one variable given the values of the others. For example, a model might estimate sales based on age and gender. .

An effect size (ES) was calculated using the posttest adjusted means and actual standard deviations In statistics, the average amount a number varies from the average number in a series of numbers.

(statistics) standard deviation - (SD) A measure of the range of values in a set of numbers.
 for each dependent variable. The formula used to calculate effect size was Cohen's d, the difference in mean scores on posttest between the experimental and alternate-treatment comparison group divided by a pooled standard deviation Pooled standard deviation is a way to find a better estimate of the true standard deviation given several different samples taken in different circumstances where the mean may vary between samples but the true standard deviation (precision) is assumed to remain the same.  for the treatment conditions (Cohen cohen
 or kohen

(Hebrew: “priest”) Jewish priest descended from Zadok (a descendant of Aaron), priest at the First Temple of Jerusalem. The biblical priesthood was hereditary and male.
, 1988).

Hierarchical linear modeling In statistics, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), also known as multi-level analysis, is a more advanced form of simple linear regression and multiple linear regression.  (HLM HLM Habitation à Loyer Modéré (France)
HLM Houston Lake Mining, Inc (Val Caron, ON, Canada)
HLM Heart-Lung Machine
HLM Hierarchical Linear Modelling
HLM Holland, Michigan
) procedures (Bryk & Raudenbush, 1992) were used to examine the relation between instructional group and children's learning trajectories on the Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF) and Phonemic Segmentation Fluency (PSF) measures, respectively.

Finally, a chi-square chi-square (ki´skwar) see under distribution and test.

chi-square
n.
 analysis was used to examine whether there were statistically significant differences between the two instructional sequences in the number of children who reached proficiency in phonemic segmentation skills by posttest. A score of 35-45 phoneme segments per minute on the Phonemic Segmentation Fluency (PSF) represents proficient pro·fi·cient  
adj.
Having or marked by an advanced degree of competence, as in an art, vocation, profession, or branch of learning.

n.
An expert; an adept.
 segmentation skill (Good & Kaminski, 1998). However, children had to maintain 35-45 segments per minute for two consecutive progress monitoring sessions (i.e., for 4 weeks) on the PSF to be considered proficient in phonemic segmentation skills.

RESULTS

Posttest Differences on Alphabetic Measures (Research Question #1)

A separate analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted to examine whether there were statistically significant posttest differences between the two instructional groups on the Letter Naming Fluency (LNF) and the Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF). No statistically significant differences were found for either dependent variable. The effect size for LNF was negligible This article or section is written like a personal reflection or and may require .
Please [ improve this article] by rewriting this article or section in an .
 (.06)--an effect size of .20 is considered small (Cohen, 1988). The effect size for NWF was moderate, .54 (Cohen, 1988).

Pearson Pear·son   , Lester Bowles 1897-1972.

Canadian politician who served as prime minister (1963-1968). He won the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize for his role in the negotiation of a solution to the Suez crisis (1956).
 correlation revealed that initial PSF scores were a significant predictor, F(1) = 12.515, p = .002, of posttest performance on the Word Identification measure, explaining approximately 37% of the variance in posttest scores for the PI group. However, initial PSF scores were not a significant predictor, F(1) = .498, p = .4894, of posttest performance on the Word Identification measure, explaining only 3% of the variance in posttest scores for the PN-I group. Results of a multiple-regression analysis revealed a statistically significant interaction, F(1, 39) = 5.471, p = .024, between instructional group and initial phonemic segmentation skills, indicating that performance on the Word Identification posttest was differentially dif·fer·en·tial  
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or showing a difference.

2. Constituting or making a difference; distinctive.

3. Dependent on or making use of a specific difference or distinction.

4.
 affected by pretest phonemic segmentation skills. Children in the PI sequence with higher initial scores in phonemic segmentation read more words on the Word Identification posttest than children in the PN-I sequence with higher initial segmentation skills.

To examine the effect of instructional group on children's ability to generalize their letter-sound correspondences to word reading, the Word Reading Generalization posttest was used as the dependent variable and the Phonemic Segmentation Fluency (PSF) pretest score as the covariate. The correlation between pretest PSF scores and Word Reading Generalization posttest scores was .66. Results revealed a statistically significant difference between instructional groups, F(1, 40) = 6.540, p = .0146, after adjusting for initial differences in phonemic segmentation skills. The effect size for the Word Reading Generalization Test at posttest was moderate, .73; an effect size of .80 is considered high (Cohen, 1988). Figure 1 illustrates that several children with initially low phonemic segmentation skills in the PI sequence, including scores of 0 and 1, were able to use their letter-sound knowledge and blending and segmenting strategies to read words.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

Posttest Differences on Phonological Measures

An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to examine the effect of instructional group on children's ability to quickly recognize and produce the onset of a word (i.e., the sounds in a word preceding the vowel). No statistically significant differences were found between instructional groups on the OnRF. The effect size for OnRF was .30.

Pearson correlation revealed that initial Phonemic Segmentation Fluency (PSF) scores were a significant predictor, F(1) = 10.06, p = .005, of posttest performance on the Phonemic Segmentation Fluency measure, explaining 36% of the variance in posttest scores for the PN-I group. However, initial PSF scores were not a significant predictor, F(1) = 1.615, p > .05, for the PI group, explaining only 7% of the variance in posttest scores for the group. Results of the multiple-regression analysis revealed a statistically significant interaction between instructional groups and initial phonemic segmentation skills, F(1,39) = 4.844, p = .0337, indicating that performance on the Phonemic Segmentation Fluency posttest was differentially affected by pretest phonemic segmentation skills. Figure 2 illustrates the interaction between instructional group and pretest PSF skills. Children in the PI sequence with initially low PSF skills demonstrated posttest PSF skills comparable to those of children with emerging and adequate phonemic segmentation skills at pretest.

[FIGURE 2 OMITTED]

Posttest, Delayed Posttest, and Maintenance Performance on Alphabetic and Phonological Measures (Research Questions #2 and #4)

Separate two-way analyses of variances (ANOVAs) with one between-groups factor and one within-groups factor were conducted for each dependent variable to examine whether the effects of instruction on word reading and phonological awareness were maintained after the intervention. No statistically significant interaction was found between instructional group and time of test, nor were the main effects for instructional group or time of test for Letter Naming Fluency and Nonsense Word Fluency statistically significant. Further, no statistically significant interaction was found between instructional group and time of test, nor were the main effects for instructional group or time of test for Letter Naming Fluency and Nonsense Word Fluency statistically significant. No statistically significant interaction was found between instructional sequence and time of test for the Word Reading Generalization Test. However, statistically significant main effects were found for instructional sequence, F(1, 39) = 7.020, p = .0116, and time of test, F(1.39) = 9.027, p = .0046. The mean scores of the PI sequence were higher than those of the PN-I sequence at posttest and maintenance on the Word Reading Generalization Test.

The results of the 2 x 3 mixed-effects ANOVA for OnRF revealed no statistically significant interaction between instructional group and time of test, indicating that instructional group was not affected differentially by time of test. Similarly, the results of the 2 x 3 mixed-effects ANOVA for Phonemic Segmentation Fluency (PSF) revealed no statistically significant interaction between instructional group and time of test, indicating that instructional group was not differentially affected by time of test. However, statistically significant differences were found for instructional group and time of test favoring favoring

an animal is said to be favoring a leg when it avoids putting all of its weight on the limb. A part of being lame in a limb.
 the PI group. Specifically, the mean scores of the PI group on the PSF measure were higher at posttest, delayed posttest, and maintenance than the scores of the PN-I sequence.

Effect of Instructional Sequence on Rate of Growth (Research Question #5)

To examine the relationship between instructional group and children's learning trajectories on the Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF) and Phonemic Segmentation Fluency (PSF) measures, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) procedures (Bryk & Raudenbush, 1992) were conducted on each measure at two levels. When instructional sequence was added to the Level 2 model, there were no reliable differences, t = .239, p > .05, between PI and PN-I groups in the predicted intercept intercept

in mathematical terms the points at which a curve cuts the two axes of a graph.
 on the NWF. Further, at posttest, the two groups were not significantly different from each other on the number of letter sounds produced per minute. However, the slopes (i.e., rate of change per 2 weeks of instruction) were significantly different on the NWF, t = 2.411, p = .021, favoring the PI group.

When instructional sequence was added to the Level 2 model for PSF, results indicated that there were no statistically significant differences, t = 1.746, p = .08, between the PI and PN-I groups for the predicted intercept. However, the rate of change in the learning trajectory was statistically significant, slope, t = 12.301, p = .000, for both instructional sequences, although there were no reliable differences between the PI and PN-I sequences, t = .860, p = .395.

In addition to rate of growth for Phonemic Segmentation Fluency (PSF), the amount of time that was required to reach proficiency in phonemic segmentation skills was calculated. The PSF measure was administered bi-weekly (at Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8) during the intervention and at posttest. Children were considered proficient in phonemic segmentation if they maintained the criterion of 35-45 phoneme segments per minute on the PSF measure for 2 consecutive data collection periods (i.e., for 4 weeks). The results of a chi-square analysis revealed statistically significant differences, chi-square (1, N = 43) = 4.08, p < .05, between instructional sequence groups for the number of children who attained this criterion by posttest. The number of children who reached proficiency was significantly higher for the PI group than for the PN-I group. (See Figure 3.)

DISCUSSION

The Effect of Instructional Sequence on Phonological Awareness Performance

Several major findings emerged when the results of Onset Recognition Fluency (OnRF) and Phonemic Segmentation Fluency (PSF) measures were examined. First, no reliable differences between PI and PN-I sequence were found on the OnRF posttest, suggesting that the PI and PN-I sequences were equally effective for teaching first sound skills and that both sequences provided enough instructional support to maintain first sound skills after intervention.

Second, only 7% of the differences in posttest PSF scores were explained by initial phonemic segmentation skill for children in the PI sequence. However, initial segmentation skill explained 36% of the posttest differences in the PN-I sequence. This pattern prompts an important conclusion about the effect of instructional sequence on phonemic segmentation fluency for kindergarten children with low segmentation skills in January January: see month. . That is, they benefited from being in the PI sequence. The explicit connections made between letter sounds and phonological blending and segmenting in the PI sequence helped children who entered the study with low segmentation skills attain posttest PSF skills that were comparable to those of children who entered the study with adequate skills. In essence, the PI sequence was effective in "closing the gap" in phonemic segmentation between children with low segmentation skills and children with adequate skills by posttest.

A third major finding indicates that explicit instruction in letter sounds and phonological blending and segmenting works. Three different analyses were used to examine the effects of instructional sequence on phonemic segmentation skills for kindergartners. Although the results appear to be somewhat contradictory for determining which instructional sequence resulted in increased phonological awareness skills, it is important to consider the nature of the different statistical analyses used to answer the research question.

First, the chi-square analysis examined how many children in each instructional sequence reached proficient segmentation skills based on an established benchmark A performance test of hardware and/or software. There are various programs that very accurately test the raw power of a single machine, the interaction in a single client/server system (one server/multiple clients) and the transactions per second in a transaction processing system.  at posttest. Results indicated that more children reached proficiency on the PSF measure (i.e., attained 35-45 phoneme segments per minute for two consecutive progress monitoring sessions) in the PI sequence (n = 20) than in the PN-I sequence (n = 12) at posttest. According to Good and Kaminski (1998), children who are proficient (i.e., can produce 35-45 segments per minute) on the PSF in winter of kindergarten have a better chance of becoming successful readers in first grade.

Next, the results of a repeated-measures ANOVA showed that children in the PI sequence demonstrated higher skills in phonemic segmentation fluency at posttest, delayed posttest, and maintenance than children in the PN-I sequence. This finding suggests that not only was the PI sequence more effective than the PN-I sequence for increasing PSF skills, but its effects were strong enough for children to maintain gains in segmentation skills even after the intervention ended.

Finally, the results of the HLM procedure indicated that the rate of change in phonemic segmentation skills as defined by slope was statistically significant for both the PI and the PN-I sequence. The average rate of change in slope per week of instruction was 3.33 correct phonemes per minute, suggesting that children's ability to segment words into individual phonemes was increasing at a reasonably high rate as a result of the explicit instruction that both the PI and PN-I sequences provided. The results of the HLM also suggest that given a longer intervention (i.e., > 10 weeks) and the continued rate of growth, children in the PN-I sequence could also meet the proficiency benchmark criterion for PSF.

In summary, the findings of this pilot study suggest that both the PI and the PN-I sequence were effective in helping children develop an understanding of the sound structure of spoken words at the most difficult level--the phoneme. Although it is beyond the range of the data to "guarantee" that the kindergarten children in this study will become successful readers in first grade, the findings suggest that both instructional sequences were instrumental in helping children reach a critical phonemic segmentation goal by the end of the study. Although the PI sequence may have strengthened the reciprocal Bilateral; two-sided; mutual; interchanged.

Reciprocal obligations are duties owed by one individual to another and vice versa. A reciprocal contract is one in which the parties enter into mutual agreements.
 benefit of alphabetic instruction on phonological awareness skills, the most concise way to summarize sum·ma·rize  
intr. & tr.v. sum·ma·rized, sum·ma·riz·ing, sum·ma·riz·es
To make a summary or make a summary of.



sum
 the effect of instructional sequence on phonological awareness skills is to note that explicit instruction in alphabetic skills and phonological blending and segmenting works.

The Effect of Instructional Sequence on Word Reading Performance

Several major findings regarding the effect of instructional sequence on word reading performance also emerged from the analyses. First, the PI and PN-I sequences were equally effective in teaching children the letter names and sounds in isolation. These results may have occurred for two reasons. First, the instructional design similarities between the PI and PN-I sequences may have been sufficient for children to make comparable progress on isolated alphabetic skills such as letter naming fluency and letter-sound identification fluency. For example, both instructional sequences provided clear, unambiguous strategies for teaching letter names and sounds, and phonological blending and segmenting, and required children only to produce the letter names and or sounds in isolation. Second, the one critical difference between the PI and PN-I sequences--the presence or absence of instruction that made explicit connections between letter-sound correspondences and phonological blending and segmenting during print activities--may not have been necessary for children to show gains in fluent fluent /flu·ent/ (floo´int) flowing effortlessly; said of speech.  letter naming and letter-sound production.

Third, the PI sequence was reliably more effective in helping children apply their letter-sound knowledge to word reading regardless of initial phonemic segmentation skills. Thus, children in the PI sequence read significantly more words per minute Noun 1. words per minute - the rate at which words are produced (as in speaking or typing)
wpm

rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"
 on the Word Reading Generalization Test at posttest than the children in the PN-I sequence. Lack of group differences on the LNF and NWF at posttest suggests that the word reading skills demonstrated on the generalization test were attributable attributable

emanating from or pertaining to attribute.


attributable proportion
see attributable risk (below).

attributable risk
 to the instructional sequence and not the result of differences in letter naming fluency and letter-sound fluency skills.

The results of this pilot study are not trivial TRIVIAL. Of small importance. It is a rule in equity that a demurrer will lie to a bill on the ground of the triviality of the matter in dispute, as being below the dignity of the court. 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 4237. See Hopk. R. 112; 4 John. Ch. 183; 4 Paige, 364. , especially for children with low phonological awareness. The findings suggest that when the connections between letter-sound correspondences and phonological blending and segmenting skills were made explicit, children with low phonological awareness were able to successfully map the sounds to letters in a word and then blend the sounds together to read the word.

Finally, the results of the HLM analysis indicated that the PI sequence led to a higher rate of change in the growth trajectory for letter-sound fluency. This finding suggests that if the rate of change in letter-sound fluency continues, the difference between the PI and PN-I in letter-sound fluency would increase over time. It is important to note that the increased learning trajectory was the result of instruction after only 10 weeks. If the learning trajectory was to increase over time with additional instruction, the assumption is that instruction will be similar to that provided in the PI sequence during the 10-week intervention period.

This finding suggests two things. First, letter-sound fluency is not an end in itself. It is a critical component of early reading development that is required for efficient and accurate decoding de·code  
tr.v. de·cod·ed, de·cod·ing, de·codes
1. To convert from code into plain text.

2. To convert from a scrambled electronic signal into an interpretable one.

3.
, a reading skill that is highly correlated with comprehension (Stanovich, 1986). Perhaps extending the intervention to the end of the kindergarten year might result in fluency levels on letter sounds that could substantially increase success in first-grade reading for all children. Second, the explicit connections made between print and phonological blending and segmenting were more efficient in helping children acquire the alphabetic principle The alphabetic principle is the understanding that letters are used to represent speech sounds, or phonemes, and that there are systematic and predictable relationships between written letters and spoken words.  and learn to translate letters into sound rapidly. While efficiency of instruction is important for all kindergarten children, it is especially critical for children with low phonological awareness, who may be at risk of reading disability unless their learning trajectory changes in a more positive direction.

LIMITATIONS

Limitations in this study include time of year, representativeness of the two instructional sequences used, intensity of instruction, and small-group setting. First, the results are based on a winter term intervention in kindergarten. The alphabetic and phonological awareness skills that were taught in the two instructional sequences were chosen because they were ecologically e·col·o·gy  
n. pl. e·col·o·gies
1.
a. The science of the relationships between organisms and their environments. Also called bionomics.

b. The relationship between organisms and their environment.
 valid for a January-through-March kindergarten intervention study. Second, the instructional sequences represent only two of many possible instructional sequences for integrating the alphabetic skills and phonological skills of blending and segmenting. Any combination of instructional sequences other than the PI and PN-I sequences may provide a very different pattern of results in terms of the effects of instructional sequence on reading performance in kindergarten. Third, the children received intensive instruction that included (a) small-group instruction, (b) carefully sequenced examples, (c) consistent instructional language, (d) many opportunities to respond, and (e) immediate feedback from teachers who were hired specifically for this study. For these reasons, the findings may not generalize to large-group instruction in the kindergarten classroom with different curricula and procedures.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE

The importance of an instructional sequence that systematically and explicitly links letter-sound correspondences and phonological blending and segmenting cannot be overemphasized. Based on the results of this pilot study, kindergarten teachers who have developed their own curriculum for teaching early literacy skills may need to consider including a 15-minute instructional period beginning in January that systematically and explicitly links letter-sound correspondence instruction with phonological blending and segmenting. Also, kindergarten teachers who are required to use a basal basal /ba·sal/ (ba´s'l) pertaining to or situated near a base; in physiology, pertaining to the lowest possible level.

ba·sal
adj.
1.
 reading textbook textbook Informatics A treatise on a particular subject. See Bible.  to teach early literacy skills may need to carefully evaluate the content and sequencing of critical skills by asking the following questions and making instructional adjustments accordingly.

First, when is instruction in phonemic blending and segmenting taught? Instruction in these two component skills should begin early enough so that children can reach the 35-45 segments per minute benchmark by the end of kindergarten. Second, is instruction in letter sounds and phonemic blending and segmenting integrated systematically and taught explicitly? If they are not, the teacher must make the connections between the alphabetic skills and phonemic blending and segmenting skill activities explicit, choosing instructional language and examples carefully. Third, do kindergarten teachers need to determine if there is sufficient time allotted for instruction in these critical skills in the text? Kindergarten teachers are key people who can make explicit those processes that are essential to beginning reading acquisition but that are not typically attended to by kindergarten children with low phonological awareness--the connections between print and the sounds of spoken language. The greater effectiveness of the PI sequence in strengthening the word reading ability of children with low phonological awareness skills suggests that how kindergarten teachers teach the two component skills of letter sounds and phonological blending and segmenting is as important to children's progress in becoming readers as what they teach.

DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

This pilot study has only begun to explore the effect of instructional sequence for integrating letter-sound correspondences with the phonological awareness skills of blending and segmenting on word reading and phonological awareness performance in kindergarten. The future direction for research includes replicating the findings of this study with different groups of kindergarten children and conducting a series of studies to extend the generalizability of the results.

The findings of this study offer evidence that the instructional sequence for integrating alphabetic and phonological skills affects reading and phonological awareness performance. However, more research is needed to examine whether the same pattern of results would occur if (a) children received instruction in a larger group, or (b) an educational assistant or classroom teacher taught the lessons. It is important to note that only two of the six instructional sequences that were identified as part of the conceptual framework were compared. An ambitious research agenda might also include systematically studying other combinations of instructional sequences and their effect on word reading performance and phonological awareness performance for kindergarten children

CONCLUSION

The PI sequence helped kindergarten children make sense of the alphabetic writing Noun 1. alphabetic writing - a writing system based on alphabetic characters
alphabetic script

orthography, writing system - a method of representing the sounds of a language by written or printed symbols
 system when learning to read. The sequence made explicit those processes that are essential to beginning reading acquisition and the implicit strategies that good readers use to recognize sounds in words, relate sounds to letters, and blend sounds into words. It was more effective in strengthening early reading and phonological awareness skills.
Table 1
Summary of Order Dimensions for Conceptual Framework

Order Dimension                   Sequence of Activity Sets

Successive                        * Set "A" activities are taught
                                  fully and completely before Set "B"
                                  activities are introduced.

                                  * Set "B" activities are introduced
                                  only after all Set "A" activities
                                  have been taught.

Parallel, non-integrated          * Set "A" and Set "B" activities
                                  are introduced and taught within
                                  the same training session but as
                                  discrete and separate activities.

Parallel, integrated              * Set "A" and Set "B" activities
                                  are taught within the same training
                                  session, and the sets of activities
                                  are integrated and linked
                                  systematically to establish
                                  explicit connections between the
                                  sets of activities.

Successive/parallel,              * Set "A" activities are taught
non-integrated                    fully and completely before Set "B"
                                  activities are introduced.

                                  * After Set "B" activities are
                                  introduced, Set "A" and Set "B"
                                  activities are taught within the
                                  same training session but as
                                  discrete and separate activities.

Successive/parallel, integrated   * Set "A" activities are taught
                                  fully and completely before Set "B"
                                  activities are introduced.

                                  * After Set "B" activities are
                                  introduced, Set "A" and Set "B"
                                  activities are taught within the
                                  same training session and the sets
                                  of activities are integrated and
                                  linked systematically to establish
                                  explicit connections between the
                                  sets of activities.

Parallel,non-integrated/          * Set "A" and Set "B" activities
successive/parallel, integrated   are taught within the same training
                                  session but as separate activities
                                  for a period of time.

                                  * After instruction in both Set "A"
                                  and Set "B" activities, the two
                                  sets of activities are integrated
                                  and linked systematically within
                                  the same training session to
                                  establish explicit connections
                                  between the two sets of activities.

Table 2
Number of Children in Each Classroom and Number of
Treatment Groups Per Classroom Across Schools

               School A    School A    School B
               Classroom   Classroom   Classroom
                   1           2           3

PI
Sequence          7 (2)       3 (1)       2 (l)

PIN
Sequence          8 (2)       4 (1)       3 (1)

Total Number
of Children      15 (4)       7 (2)       5 (2)

               School B    School C      Total
               Classroom   Classroom   Number of
                   4           5       Children

PI
Sequence          9 (2)       7 (2)     28 (28)

PIN
Sequence          8 (2)       4 (1)      27 (7)

Total Number
of Children     17 (14)      11 (3)     55 (15)

Note. The number in () represents the number of treatment groups.

Table 3
Teachers in School, Classroom, Treatment Condition, and Lessons

              School A      School A       School B
            Classroom 1   Classroom 2    Classroom 3

Lessons     1-20   21-4   1-20   21-40   1-20   21-40

Teacher 1   PI     PNI    PNI     PI      PI     PNI
Teacher 2    PI    PNI     PI     PNI    PNI     PI
Teacher 3   PNI     PI     --     --      --     --
Teacher 4   PNI     PI     --     --      --     --

              School B       School C
            Classroom 4    Classroom 5

Lessons     1-20   21-40   1-20   21-40

Teacher l   PNI     PI     PNI     PI
Teacher 2   PNI     PI      PI     PI
Teacher 3    PI     PNI     PI     PNI
Teacher 4    PI     PNI     --     --

Note. Dashes indicate that teacher did not teach an
instructional group in the classroom.

PI = Parallel, integrated sequence; PN-I = Parallel,
non-integrated sequence.

Table 4
Relation of Measures to Research Questions

Research Question                   Measured By

1. Does a parallel, integrated      Posttest, delayed post,
(PI) sequence of instruction          maintenance measures of:
result in higher word reading       * Letter Naming Fluency (LNF)
performance for kindergarten        * Woodcock Reading Mastery
children with low phonological        Test-Revised (WRMT-R)
awareness skills than a             * Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF)
parallel, non-integrated (PN-I)     * Word Reading Generalization
sequence of instruction?              Test

2. Were the effects of              Posttest, delayed post,
instruction maintained for word       maintenance measures of:
reading performance after the       * Letter Naming Fluency (LNF)
intervention was discontinued?      * Woodcock Reading Mastery
                                      Test-Revised (WRMT-R)
                                    * Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF)
                                    * Word Reading Generalization
                                      Test

3. Does a parallel, integrated      Posttest measures of:
(PI) sequence of instruction        * Onset Recognition Fluency
result in higher phonological         (OnRF)
awareness performance for           * Phonemic Segmentation
kindergarten children with low        Fluency (PSF)
phonological awareness skills
than a parallel, non-integrated
(PN-I) sequence of instruction?

4. Were the effects of              Posttest, delayed post,
instruction maintained for            maintenance measures of:
awareness performance after the     * Onset Recognition Fluency
intervention was discontinued?        (OnRF)
                                    * Phonemic Segmentation Fluency
                                      (PST)

Does a parallel, integrated (PI)    Pretest, progressing monitoring,
sequence of instruction result        and posttest measures of:
in higher rates of growth in        * Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF)
word reading and phonological       * Phonemic Segmentation Fluency
awareness for kindergarten            (PSF)
children with low phonological
awareness skills than a parallel,
non-integrated (PN-I) sequence?

Figure 3 Number of children who reached proficiency at
posttest in each instructional group.

                      Number of Children
                     Reaching Proficiency

Data Collection    Parallel,     Parallel,
Periods           integrated   non-integrated

PM 1-2                 0             0
PM 2-4                 5             2
PM 3-6                 9             5
PM 4-8                17            12
Post                  12            12

Note. P.M. 1-2 = Progress monitoring #1 (Week 2);
P.M. 2-4 = Progress monitoring #2 (Week 4);
P.M. 3-6 = Progress monitoring #3 (Week 6);
P.M. 4-8 = Progress monitoring #4 (Week 8);
Post = Posttest.

Note: Table made from bar graph.


NOTE

The author would like to acknowledge the expert guidance and feedback of Edward Edward

killed his father at his mother’s instigation. [Br. Balladry: Edward in Benét, 302]

See : Patricide
 J. Kameenui, Ph.D., University of Oregon The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. The university was founded in 1876, graduating its first class two years later. The University of Oregon is one of 60 members of the Association of American Universities. , for his untiring support during the conceptualization con·cep·tu·al·ize  
v. con·cep·tu·al·ized, con·cep·tu·al·iz·ing, con·cep·tu·al·iz·es

v.tr.
To form a concept or concepts of, and especially to interpret in a conceptual way:
 and implementation of this dissertation dis·ser·ta·tion  
n.
A lengthy, formal treatise, especially one written by a candidate for the doctoral degree at a university; a thesis.


dissertation
Noun

1.
 study.

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Silbert, J., Carnine, D., & Stein, M. (1990). Direct instruction mathematics. Columbus Columbus.

1 City (1990 pop. 178,681), seat of Muscogee co., W Ga., at the head of navigation on the Chattahoochee River; settled and inc. 1828 on the site of a Creek village.
, OH: Merrill Mer·rill   , James 1926-1995.

American poet whose works include Divine Comedies (1976), which won a Pulitzer Prize.
.

Simmons, D. C., & Kameenui, E. J. (Eds.). (1998). What reading research tells us about children with diverse learning needs: Bases and basics. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Smith, S. B., Simmons, D. C., & Kameenui, E. J. (1998). Phonological awareness: Research bases. In D. C. Simmons & E. J. Kameenui (Eds.), What reading research tells as about children with diverse learning needs: Bases and basics (pp. 129-140). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Snider, V. E., (1997). The relationship between phonemic awareness and later reading achievement. The Journal of Educational Research, 90(4), 203-211.

Spector, J. E. (1992). Predicting progress in beginning reading: Dynamic assessment of phonemic awareness. Journal of Educational Psychology, 84, 353-363.

Stanovich, K. E. (1986). Matthew effects The term "Matthew effect" may refer, depending on context, to a number of ideas all related to a parable in the Gospel of Matthew: Biblical
The "Matthew effect
 in reading: Some consequences of individual differences in the acquisition of literacy. Reading Research Quarterly, 21, 360-407.

Torgesen, J. K., & Davis, C. (1996). Individual difference variables that predict response to training in phonological awareness. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 63, 1-21.

Torgesen, J. K., Morgan, S., & Davis, C. (1992). The effects of two types of phonological awareness training on word learning in kindergarten children. Journal of Educational Psychology, 84, 364-370.

Torgesen, J. K., Wagner, R. K., & Rashotte, C. A. (1994). Longitudinal studies of phonological processing and reading. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 27, 776-786.

Torgesen, J. K., Wagner, R. K., & Rashotte, C. A. (1997). Prevention and remediation of severe reading disabilities: Keeping the end in mind. Scientific Studies in Reading, 1, 217-234.

Vandervelden, M. C., & Siegel, L. S. (1997). Teaching phonological processing skills in early literacy: A developmental approach. Learning Disability Quarterly, 20, 63-80.

Wagner, J. (1993). Ignorance Ignorance
See also Stupidity.

Am ha-Arez

those negligent in or unobservant of Torah study. [Judaism: Wigoder, 26]

avidya

ignorance as cause of suffering through desire. [Hindu Phil.
 in educational research: Or how can you not know that? Educational Researcher, 22, 15-23.

Wagner, R. K. (1988). Causal causal /cau·sal/ (kaw´z'l) pertaining to, involving, or indicating a cause.

causal

relating to or emanating from cause.
 relations between the development of phonological processing abilities and the acquisition of reading skills: A meta-analysis meta-analysis /meta-anal·y·sis/ (met?ah-ah-nal´i-sis) a systematic method that takes data from a number of independent studies and integrates them using statistical analysis. . Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 34(2), 261-279.

Wagner, R. K., & Torgesen, J. (1987). The nature of phonological processing and its causal role in the acquisition of reading skills. Psychological Bulletin, 101, 192-212.

Wagner, R. K., Torgesen, J. K., Rashotte, C. A., Hecht, S. A., Barker, T. A., Burgess BURGESS. A magistrate of a borough; generally, the chief officer of the corporation, who performs, within the borough, the same kind of duties which a mayor does in a city. In England, the word is sometimes applied to all the inhabitants of a borough, who are called burgesses sometimes it , S. R., Donahue Donahue is a surname of Irish origin. It is a variant of O'Donoghue and therefore associated with the O'Donoghue Clan.

The name Donahue may refer to one of several people:
  • Ann Donahue, (born 1955), American television writer
, J., & Garon, T. (1997). Changing relations between phonological processing abilities and word-level reading as children develop from beginning to skilled readers: A 5-year longitudinal study longitudinal study

a chronological study in epidemiology which attempts to establish a relationship between an antecedent cause and a subsequent effect. See also cohort study.
. Developmental Psychology developmental psychology

Branch of psychology concerned with changes in cognitive, motivational, psychophysiological, and social functioning that occur throughout the human life span.
, 33, 468-479.

Wolf, M. A., & Bowers, P. G. (1999). The double-deficit hypothesis An assumption or theory.

During a criminal trial, a hypothesis is a theory set forth by either the prosecution or the defense for the purpose of explaining the facts in evidence.
 for the developmental dyslexias. Journal of Educational Psychology, 91, 415-438.

Woodcock, R. W. (1987). Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests-Revised. Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Service.

Yopp, H. K. (1988). The validity and reliability of phonemic awareness tests. Reading Research Quarterly, 23(2), 159-176.

Requests for reprints should be addressed to: Sr. Mary Mary, the mother of Jesus
Mary, in the Bible, mother of Jesus. Christian tradition reckons her the principal saint, naming her variously the Blessed Virgin Mary, Our Lady, and Mother of God (Gr., theotokos). Her name is the Hebrew Miriam.
 Karen Karen

Any member of a variety of tribal peoples of southern Myanmar (Burma). Constituting the second largest minority in Myanmar, the Karen are not a unitary group in any ethnic sense, as they differ among themselves linguistically, religiously, and economically.
 Oudeans, School of Education, Silver Lake College Silver Lake College is a four-year, Catholic liberal arts college located in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, in the Diocese of Green Bay. Founded as an academy in 1885 by the Franciscan Sisters of Christian Charity, the college achieved four-year college status in 1935 and was then called , 2406 S. Alverno Rd., Manitowoc Manitowoc (măn'ĭtəwŏk`), industrial city (1990 pop. 32,520), seat of Manitowoc co., E Wis., a port of entry on Lake Michigan at the mouth of the Manitowoc River; inc. 1870. , WI 54220.

SISTER MARY KAREN OUDEANS, Ph.D., is chair, Department of Special Education, Silver Lake College, Manitowoc, Wisconsin Manitowoc (/ˈmæ.nɪ.to.ˌwak/) is the county seat of Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. The city is located on Lake Michigan at the mouth of the Manitowoc River. .
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Title Annotation:Winner of CLD's 2003 Award For Outstanding Research
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Publication:Learning Disability Quarterly
Date:Sep 22, 2003
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