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Imaging lightens paper load at USC, Raytheon.

Imaging Lightens Paper Load At USC, Raytheon A university admissions department and a missile plant are using document imaging to cut through their mountains of official paper.

The University of Southern California and Raytheon's Missile Systems Division plant in Andover, Mass., bought Wang Integrated Image Systems.

The university wants to better manage student admissions information, while the missile plant deals with tremendous volumes of supplier quotation information in its procurement department.

USC decided on the system after a successful trial that tested integration with its existing Prime computer network. Its admissions office processes up to 30,000 fall student applications.

The system lets admissions counselors see, on image-capable computer workstations, electronic images of student applications, transcripts, essays, letters of recommendation, and other documents, along with data records accessed from a Prime host.

"The faster USC can decide and notify an applicant of acceptance, the more likely the student will select USC over competing schools," says Tom Myers, director of marketing services.

Wang's Freestyle personal computing system lets counselors electronically add handwritten notes on applicants' transcripts while the images are being viewed on the workstations.

The $1.2 million USC system includes a VS 7150 mid-range computer; 30 image workstations, 25 with Freestyle capabilities; a laser printer; five endorsers; and five document scanners. Initial storage for document images is eight gigabytes of magnetic disk storage.

Raytheon, facing a wave of 250,000 incoming documents each year, is using image processing for fast access to paper-based supplier documents and maintenance of complete records for government reporting purposes.

With a Wang VS Fax Gateway, Raytheon can fax information inquiries directly to vendors from a Wang VS computer.

The system purchased by Raytheon includes a Wang VS 5650; three standalone optical disk drives; five image-capable workstations; a document scanner; and a laser printer.

"Managing defense electronics procurements is a paper-incentive process," explains Thomas R. Haynes, manager of factory support procurement at Andover.

"Document imaging will cut proposal cycle time, increase responsiveness to our customers, and help us ensure that the information we disclose to the government is current and complete," Haynes says.

Raytheon integrated the imaging equipment with its existing procurement proposal system, which operates on an IBM 3090 mainframe.
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Publication:Communications News
Date:Mar 1, 1990
Words:366
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